FOREIGN POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

A nation must think before it acts.

aka FPRI   |   Philadelphia, PA   |  www.fpri.org

Mission

The Foreign Policy Research Institute is dedicated to producing the highest quality scholarship and nonpartisan policy analysis focused on crucial foreign policy and national security challenges facing the United States. We educate those who make and influence policy, as well as the public at large, through the lens of history, geography, and culture.

Ruling year info

1970

President

Carol Flynn

Main address

1528 Walnut Street Suite 610

Philadelphia, PA 19102 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-1731998

NTEE code info

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (Q05)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (B05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The United States faces multiple serious challenges from abroad – from major powers like China and Russia, from rogue states like Iran and North Korea, and from non-state actors like Al Qaeda and ISIS. Policymakers and the general public require honest, nonpartisan analysis both to understand these complex issues and to develop policies to cope with them. An informed public is essential to sustaining a coherent foreign policy.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program on National Security

More than a decade after the 9/11 attacks the world remains a complicated and dangerous place. The crises in Syria and Iraq and Ukraine are clearly destabilizing and China’s actions in the South and East China Seas have potentially deleterious consequences for Asian regional security. The United States faces dynamic threats from non-state threats (e.g., terrorism, cyber threats, pandemics, etc.) as well as the reassertion of a more competitive international state system. While such matters may not pose as severe a threat as what the Cold War posed, today’s complexities are compounded because of domestic political differences in the U.S. that question what should, or should not, be the Nation’s role in international security and the resources that should, or should not, be allocated to deal with these problems.

FPRI’s Program on National Security seeks to help illuminate and address these issues and trends by examining contemporary and emergent concerns for American and international security through a wide aperture by bringing expertise to bear in publications, media appearances, and briefings. The Institute’s location in Philadelphia outside of the shorter attention span of Washington policy debates allows the Program to look at current and emergent problems with a longer-range view. In particular the program focuses on:
■ American grand strategy
■ The current and future global geopolitical environment that affect the U.S. and its interests
■ The ends (strategies), ways (organization and methods of force employment), and means (force structures and capabilities) that impact the use of military force,
Counterterrorism and homeland security
■ Development, diplomacy, and informational issues that contribute to the holistic implementation of strategy
■ Competitive soft power and engagement.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Despite the clamor for America’s foreign policy to pivot toward Asia and away from the Middle East, events in the region over the past several years require sustained American attention. The region has become more complicated than ever. The days of state power being held in a single hand, or iron fist depending on the locale, are fading. The internal political chaos which now consumes Middle Eastern capitals from Damascus to Sanaa will likely be with us for some time. The stakes remain high for the United States and therefore necessitate sustained engagement based on new thinking. The challenges at hand are many, including Iran’s regional destabilizing ambitions, the rise of the greatest terrorist threat this world has seen in the form of ISIS, the ostensible collapse of the old state order in the Greater Middle East, and ever entrenched conflict between Israelis and Palestinians and among Syrians themselves that continues to claim the lives and the futures of generations.

FPRI’s Middle East program is uniquely positioned to provide the kind of strategic thinking and thoughtful analysis required to heed this call. FPRI has been known for its focus on geopolitics since its founder Robert Strausz-Hupé popularized the term for Americans in the mid-20th century. This geopolitical outlook has served the Institute well for over a half century. Following in that tradition, the Program on the Middle East brings together both established and emerging scholars from the academic, military, and policy worlds in an effort to develop a new cadre of strategic policy thinkers, versed in the geography, history, culture, and politics of the region. This geopolitical outlook is particularly important when analyzing the Middle East. In fact, the term “Middle East” was coined in 1902 by one of America’s great devotees of geopolitics – U.S. Navy Captain, Alfred T. Mahan. For Captain Mahan in the early 20th century, the region’s importance was rooted in its geopolitics. As fleeting intellectual fads have come and gone in Western capitals, the geopolitical bedrock of geography, history, and culture continue to shape Middle Eastern politics. These factors do not transform with every street demonstration and even in these fast changing times, they continue to frame some of the most prudent analysis of the American interest in the region.

Accordingly, FPRI’s Program on the Middle East offers context, content, and policy recommendations based on a holistic view of American strategic interests in the region. Its analysis transcends headlines and catch phrases. Throughout its research, publications, and educational outreach, the program focuses on key themes such as authoritarianism and reform; the aftermath of the Arab Uprisings; radicalism and regional threats; sectarian divisions; and the Arab-Israeli conflict and peace efforts. FPRI’s Program on the Middle East is dedicated to ensuring that its vital and time-tested geopolitical approach continues to bear fruit. Therefore, the Program seeks to provide its particular brand of informed analysis on regional developments to policymakers, academics, journalists, educators, and others interested in the Middle East. It also seeks to build relationships with like-minded institutions and individuals from the region, in an effort to both enrich the Program’s perspectives and to provide a platform for indigenous analyses and critiques from within the Middle East itself.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Center for the Study of America and the West was founded at FPRI in 1997 when the great debate over the shape of the post-Cold War world order was at its peak. At FPRI, it seemed critically important in either case for Americans to remember the roots and values of the United States, inquire about its role within Western Civilization, and, indeed, the role of Western Civilization in modern world history. Since the events of September 11, 2001, and the onset of the war against violent extremist forms of Islam, FPRI can only assert that the mission of the Center for the Study of America and the West has become even more critical. The Center brings together historians, political scientists, and other scholars who explore and illuminate the key dimensions of American identity and Western Civilization. The Center publishes original research, hosts many events throughout the year, sponsors history institutes for high school teachers nationwide, and offers materials to many thousand more as web-based resources. The Center’s work affects both the scholarly discourse and the teaching of history, with a unique program on teaching American military history.

Population(s) Served
Adults

FPRI’s Asia Program promotes debate and analysis of important developments in Asia, with an emphasis on East Asia, including China and Taiwan. The program includes four interrelated initiatives:

(1) conferences,
(2) educational programs for the public and teachers, and
(3) research and publication.

We look forward to continued growth in the community of scholars, officials, and concerned public citizens who regularly participate and make vital contributions to our organized activities.

We have always focused on relations among China, Taiwan and the United States, but our program has always recognized the importance of events outside this triangle. As part of our regional studies, our program is also attentive to Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, and South Asia.

Population(s) Served
Adults

FPRI’s Eurasia Program analyzes political, security, and economic trends in Russia, Eurasia and Eastern Europe. The program has four main parts: the Baltic Initiative, the Black Sea Initiative, the Russia Political Economy Project, and the Project on Democratic Transitions.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Butcher History Institute, co-chaired by Walter A. McDougall and David Eisenhower, sponsors programs designed to bring high school teachers from around the country together with the nation’s top scholars in history, political science, and other fields for an intensive weekend of lectures and discussion on topics in American and world history and international relations.

Population(s) Served
Academics
Children and youth

Building on our twenty years of work with high school teachers, FPRI’s Center for the Study of America and the West has begun an ambitious program in Civic Education for students. This initiative includes both partnerships with local schools and the production of materials aimed at school audiences, to enrich young people’s understanding of the institutions and ideas that shape American political life.
Through the development of multimedia primers on important American and Western institutions, as well as a series of educational simulation programs on the founding and the cornerstones of American liberty, the Center is making a timely contribution to civic education and good citizenship not only in Philadelphia but nationally.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Foreign Policy Research Institute is dedicated to producing the highest quality scholarship and nonpartisan policy analysis focused on crucial foreign policy and national security challenges facing the United States. We educate those who make and influence policy, as well as the public at large, through the lens of history, geography, and culture.

FPRI has three main areas of operation to meet these goals. First, FPRI conducts research through its network of affiliate scholars, publishing everything from short blog posts to lengthier essays to full-length book manuscripts, as well as a quarterly academic journal. Second, FPRI hosts public events throughout the East Coast and other locations providing historical context to current geopolitical issues. Third, FPRI's educational programming consists of a series of professional development seminars for teachers, a yearlong internship program for college students, and a civics education program for high school students.

FPRI has a network of over 100 affiliated scholars representing diverse points of view but all united in their determination to preserve and protect America's national interests and values. Our affiliated fellows are drawn from diverse disciplines in academia and from diverse career tracks outside of academia; they have often risen to key policy positions in the US government and appear or are cited in news media hundreds of times each year. We have over 60 years of experience in producing and disseminating policy-relevant scholarship, and over 20 years of experience in providing professional development for high school teachers and educational experiences for students. FPRI's scholarship is promoted through a variety of channels to over 260,000 social media fans and over 80,000 monthly web users.

FPRI has over 100 affiliated scholars and 5 research programs producing quality scholarship on pressing policy issues in the form of 300 essays annually, plus 4 issues of a quarterly policy journal, and several books, podcasts, and animated videos per year. Our social media following has grown to 260,000 followers, and we receive over 500 media hits -- locally, nationally, and internationally. Our educational programs have hosted over 1,000 teacher participants in History Institutes to date and we engage over 200 students and teachers each year through our civic education initiative. We also host over 50 public events annually. Our alumni have occupied key positions in the State and Defense Departments, and on the National Security Council staff. Accordingly, the Global Go-To Think Tank Index has ranked FPRI as #1 among US think tanks with a budget under $5 million for the past few years.

In the future, we look to expand our reach through increasing use of new technologies and new platforms while growing our in-house staff to meet these goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are in the process of updating our membership structure to better align with the needs of our constituencies.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

FOREIGN POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FOREIGN POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Robert Freedman

Dechert, LLP

Term: 2021 - 2021

Dov Zakheim

John Hillen

James Averill

J. Michael Barron

Edward Bishop

Gwen Borowsky

National Liberty Museum

Ruth Bramson

Robert Carr

Ahmed Charai

MarocTelematique

Winston Churchill

Devon Cross

Gerrard Cuddy

Peter Dachowski

Robert Fox

R.A.F. Foundation

James Gately

Susan Goldberg

John Haines

Donald Kardon

Marina Kats

Kats, Jamison, and Associates

John Lehman

J.F. Lehman & Company

David Marshall

Amerimar Realty

Ronald Naples

Micahel Novakovic

Edward O'Connor

Cooke and Bieler

Marshall Pagon

Pegasus Communications Corporation

James Papada III

Technitrol, Inc.

John Piasecki

Piasecki Corporation

Eileen Rosenau

Eileen Rosenau Associates

Adele Schaeffer

Hillard Torgerson

Adrian Basora

James Hitch III

Joseph Field

Murray Levin

Pepper Hamilton LLP

Lee Woolley

Alan Luxenberg

Stephen Phillips

Medtronic, Inc.

Richard Berkman

Dechert, LLP

H.R. McMaster

Laura LaRosa

Glenmede

Larry Ceisler

Ceisler Media

Charles Ray

James Meyer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/8/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.