Juvenile Law Center

Fighting for the rights and well-being of youth

aka JLC   |   Philadelphia, PA   |  www.jlc.org

Mission

Juvenile Law Center fights for rights, dignity, equity, and opportunity for youth. We work to reduce the harm of the child welfare and justice systems, limit their reach, and ultimately abolish them so all young people can thrive. Founded in 1975, Juvenile Law Center was the first nonprofit, public interest law firm for children in the country. As an advocacy organization we now use multiple approaches to accomplish our mission: legal advocacy, policy advocacy, youth-led advocacy, and strategic communications. Our strategies are interconnected. We pair impact litigation with policy advocacy and community organizing to push for lasting and transformative change. Our policy agenda is informed by—and often conducted in collaboration with—youth, family members, and grassroots partners.

Ruling year info

1975

Chief Executive Officer

Susan Vivian Mangold Esq.

Main address

1800 John F. Kennedy Boulevard 1900B

Philadelphia, PA 19103 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-1976386

NTEE code info

Children's Rights (R28)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Children's Rights (R28)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today’s inequities in the child welfare and justice systems are rooted in cruel and discriminatory practices that date back to slavery and have been reinforced decade after decade. While these systems have always purported to help children, in reality they have created mechanisms of social control, paternalism, and family separation that entrench hierarchy on the basis of race, ethnicity, nationality, immigration status, class, religion, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, and disability. The results are systems that consistently fail youth of all backgrounds, but disproportionately harm youth already marginalized by society. This history calls for a bold rethinking of our field, requiring us to dismantle systems of state-imposed harm and build new approaches that allow young people to thrive in their families and communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Justice

In our fight to promote procedural due process, access to counsel, and racial and economic justice, we seek to ensure that the laws, policies, and practices affecting youth are informed by research. They should also be consistent with children’s developmental needs and reflect international human rights values.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

We believe that youth should remain in their families and communities whenever possible. We must strive to limit their contact with the child welfare and justice systems in the first place. When they do engage these systems, we need to ensure that institutions do not harm the youth they were designed to support.

Juvenile Law Center addresses structural injustice and works to eliminate existing disparities through impact litigation and policy reform at the state and local levels. We also seek to ensure that the laws, policies, and practices that impact youth in the child welfare and justice systems are grounded in principles of adolescent development and human rights.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Juvenile Law Center’s youth advocacy programs create opportunities for youth in the child welfare and justice systems to lead advocacy efforts in their communities. Youth in Juvenile Law Center’s youth advocacy programs work to affect policy change through policy advocacy, media outreach, and public education. Youth develop leadership skills, political knowledge, communication and storytelling skills, and a sense of community. By sharing their personal experiences with Juvenile Law Center staff, youth also provide insight into the organization’s advocacy priorities.

Each year, Youth Fostering Change and Juveniles for Justice select an area of focus, determine a strategy to address it, and implement their project. Projects areas include juvenile records expungement, access to education, preventing youth homelessness, and improving foster care placements for older youth. Juvenile Law Center provides essential support, ensuring that the participants develop the skills they need to succeed.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Juvenile Law Center is one of the leading national organizations working to abolish solitary confinement, protect youth from harsh conditions, and safeguard them from physical, emotional, and sexual abuse.

We advocate for reforms that address extreme conditions and help establish sound policies such as access to counseling and supports that keep children safe while in prison. We also promote alternatives to incarceration entirely. Research demonstrates that, with the right help, young people do better with their families and in their communities.

We do this important work through federal and state legislative advocacy, impact litigation, and research and education. Our efforts focus on:

Eliminating solitary confinement, strip searches, and excessive force used against kids; Keeping kids safe from harm from facility staff, other youth, and themselves; Ensuring kids have developmentally appropriate care and activities; Fair treatment, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, or disability status; and Minimizing the amount of time kids spend in youth prisons.

It's working. Some states have curtailed the use of solitary confinement and seen a reduction in youth violence, not an escalation. And while the United Nations Convention on the Rights of a Child established solitary confinement as a human rights violation, the US is one of the only countries remaining who has not signed this agreement. There is clearly much more work to do.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

MacArthur Award for Creative & Effective Institutions 2008

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Best “Law” Website in the 17th Annual Webby Awards 2013

International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences

Gloria J. Jenkins Award for Outstanding Contributions to Juvenile Justice Reform by a Community Organization 2013

Annie E. Casey Foundation

"Part 4: Protecting a Child's Right to Counsel" won PASS (Prevention of a Safer Society) Award 2011

National Council on Crime and Delinquency

Thurgood Marshall Award - R. Schwartz & M. Levick 2011

Philadelphia Bar Association, Criminal Justice Section

Citizens of the Year -M. Levick & L. Rosado 2009

Philadelphia Inquirer

Livingston Hall Award - Marsha Levick 2010

American Bar Association

Livingston Hall Award - Robert G. Schwartz 2001

American Bar Association

Leonard E. Weinglass in Defense of Civil Liberties Award 2010

American Association for Justice

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To address the deep harm and structural disparities of the child welfare and justice systems, we will work to limit the reach of, and ultimately abolish these systems to direct resources instead to youth, families and communities. Because youth still face immediate harm in these systems, we also engage in harm-reduction efforts.

Creating this balance will require nuanced decision-making as we endeavor to ensure that our short-term efforts to protect young people from harm don’t build up the very systems we aim to replace. To support effective decision-making on these issues, we will rely on the input of individuals directly impacted by these systems and use strategies that explicitly confront racism and discrimination. We will also continue to work for laws, policies, and practices affecting youth in the child welfare and justice systems to be grounded in principles of adolescent development, human rights, and individual dignity, and to ensure that state systems are accountable to community members with the most at stake, including youth in the child welfare and justice system and their family members.

Juvenile Law Center uses multiple approaches to accomplish our ends: legal advocacy, policy advocacy, youth-led advocacy, and strategic communications. Our strategies are interconnected. We pair impact litigation with policy advocacy and community organizing to push for lasting and transformative change. Our policy agenda is informed by—and often conducted in collaboration with—youth, family members, and grassroots partners. Our youth advocacy campaigns respond to legal and policy opportunities in the field. In all our work, we seek out strategic communications opportunities to enhance the work and to shape public opinion. We seek opportunities across the country to work where we can respond to identified needs in the community, build on local partnerships, leverage legislative and legal reform opportunities and create momentum for change.

Financials

Juvenile Law Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Juvenile Law Center

Board of directors
as of 11/04/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Stephen Labaton

NBC Universal

Term: 2020 -

Barry Zubrow

ITB llc

Daniel Segal, Esq.

Hangley Aronchick Segal Pudlin & Schiller

Juan Williams

Fox News

Ann Rosewater

Eric Koenig, Esq.

Vernon Francis, Esq.

Dechert LLP

Susan Jin Davis

Comcast

Stephen Labaton, Esq.

RLM Finsbury

Robert Reinstein, Esq.

Temple University Beasley School of Law

Elizabeth Scott, Esq.

Columbia University School of Law

Anita DeFrantz, Esq

Tubman Truth Corp.

Nadeem Bezar, Esq.

Kline & Specter

Emily Buss

University of Chicago

Kathleen Chimicles, ASA

GlenDevon Group, Inc.

Sekou Lewis, Esq.

Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis

Johnny Perez

U.S. Prison Program for the National Religious Campaign Against Torture

MIchael Ruger, Esq.

Comcast

Scott Barsky

RSM US LLP

Thomas McCoy, Esq.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data