PLATINUM2022

Womens Center of Montgomery County

Transforming Lives to Soar Beyond Domestic Violence

aka Women's Center of Montgomery County   |   Colmar, PA   |  www.wcmontco.org

Mission

The Women’s Center of Montgomery County (WCMC) is a volunteer, community organization with a primary focus on freedom from domestic violence and other forms of abuse. Our programs, policies and procedures reflect our strong commitment to empowering women. Our organizational purpose is to eliminate domestic violence so that individuals can live safer, more stable lives and thrive. Through our programs and services, we work to save lives, promote self-sufficiency, create institutional change and reduce the impact of domestic violence. Secondary goals include providing enrichment opportunities for our staff and volunteers; promoting positive change toward gender equality; and building our capacity by increasing volunteerism, funding and awareness.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Maria Macaluso

Main address

2506 North Broad Street Suite 203

Colmar, PA 18915 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-2000206

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Established in 1976, the primary organizational purpose of the Women’s Center of Montgomery County (WCMC) is to eliminate domestic violence so that individuals and families can live safer, more stable lives and thrive. Our Domestic Violence Program addresses the problem of interpersonal violence with services that include intervention, prevention and empowerment methodologies. We also train first responders and other social service providers to effectively identify and refer victims. Our community education work focuses on both prevention and helping individuals self-identify by recognizing the dynamics of abuse and the resources available to assist them.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Domestic Violence Program

Established in 1976, the Women’s Center of Montgomery County (WCMC) supports domestic violence victims and their families in their transition from crisis to safety.

Our organizational purpose is to eliminate domestic violence so that individuals can live safer, more stable lives and thrive. Through our programs and services, we work to save lives, promote self-sufficiency, create institutional change and reduce the impact of domestic violence. Secondary goals include providing enrichment opportunities for our staff and volunteers; promoting positive change toward gender equality; and building our capacity by increasing volunteerism, funding and awareness.

In addition to our crisis hotline, services are primarily provided in offices located in Elkins Park, Norristown, Lansdale, Pottstown, Colmar and Bryn Mawr. Through our Medical Advocacy Project, we provide staffing at Abington/Jefferson and Holy Redeemer Hospitals. We also staff an office at the Norristown Court House assisting with Protection from Abuse Orders.

Our work incorporates several researched-based practices developed specifically to address the needs of domestic violence victims, with an emphasis on a trauma-informed methodology. Our domestic violence project services include:

Intervention Services - 24-hour hotline; safety planning, individualized/group counseling; legal options counseling; court accompaniment; elder abuse services; information and resource referral. Additional services include assistance finding affordable and/or temporary housing; emergency cash relocation assistance.

Prevention services include education programs to create awareness about abuse dynamics; dating violence and stalking prevention; and training for law enforcement on effective response protocols.

Medical Advocacy training for medical providers in universal screening, identification and early intervention. We were the first PA program to expand efforts to include identification of at-risk children who witness domestic violence, elder abuse screenings in healthcare settings and training for Urgent Care Centers.

Through these services, the WCMC supports victims and their families in their transition toward safety, while also training first responders and other social service providers so that they can effectively identify and refer victims, and educating our community about the dynamics of abuse and available resources to assist them.

Target Population: In 2018/19, we served 4,944 Adult unduplicated primary victims. Through our Legal Advocacy Project, we assisted with 47 Emergency Orders, 1,131 Temporary and Final Orders, and 127 ICC and preliminary hearings.

We also have several funded initiatives serving special populations including:
• Elderly victims
• Children exposed to domestic violence
• Latina victims
• LGBTQIA victims

NEW INITIATIVES:
In 2018/2019 we secured multiyear funding to expand our domestic violence intervention services to support victims and their children in achieving long term stability through housing opportunities and economic literacy.
Our project serves domestic violence victims as they transition beyond crisis toward self-sufficiency, safety and permanency, providing integrative services that create a bridge from crisis to stability.

Through our Housing Program we support victims with
• Transitional Housing
• Emergency safe housing
• Up-to-date information on affordable housing options
• Advocacy to increase the pool of accessible housing
• Assistance navigating the public housing system
• Eviction defense
• Strategies to pay off back rent

Through our Financial Literacy/Financial Empowerment Program we offer:
• Individual counseling to assess a client’s financial standing, credit history and debt.
• Assistance with government benefits
• Workshops on budgeting, credit, debt management and financial safety planning
• Assistance with resume preparation, interview skills, job search strategies

This project functions in tandem with our crisis intervention services to promote self-sufficiency and reduce the likelihood that victims will return to their abuser.

COORDINATION OF SERVICES IN THE COMMUNITY: The WCMC has been successful throughout our history in building strong and enduring collaborations with partners whose expertise with a specific population, combined with our expertise in providing trauma-informed services, improves our ability to reach and assist victims. WCMC staff serve on more than 12 county and statewide taskforces & boards in leadership roles.

Through our collaborations and systems advocacy work, the outcome we seek, in addition to assisting individual clients to resolve and improve their personal situation, we work at systems levels to create:

• Interventions that create positive systemic change and innovation
• Advocacy that addresses social change on a global level to improve service access for all victims of domestic violence.

Current funded partnerships include:
• Abington/Jefferson Health elder abuse initiative;
• Abington/Jefferson & Holy Redeemer Health counseling, medical advocacy, child advocacy;
• Creative Health Services therapy programs for children and batters’ treatment;
• Legal Aid referral process for dv victims with legal issues;
• Court Administration and DA’s office – providing services under the Rights and Services Act including crime victim compensation, victim notification, and assistance with impact statements;
• Lincoln Center for Family and Youth – providing support groups and case management for children affected by family violence;
• Victim Services Center – collaborating on PSVI orders and community outreach
• Family Services Center/Women’s Re-Entry Project – providing housing for women leaving incarceration who are/were victims of domestic violence.

Through all of these efforts, we have created a network of community partners; promoted inclusivity, outreach and awareness; and provided trauma informed/trauma responsive services to victims of domestic violence.

COMMITMENT TO VOLUNTEERISM: Organizationally, one of our greatest strengths is our volunteer labor force.
Our volunteers are the heart of our organization, providing direct services 24/7 to victims of domestic violence. Each year the Women’s Center of Montgomery County benefits from more than 20,000 hours of volunteer time, comprised of more than 185 trained volunteers providing direct services to victims of domestic violence, staffing our thrift shop and conducting our community education events. Our reliance on a volunteer labor force has been a key factor in our ability to withstand the budget cuts which have faced so many non-profits in recent years.

Utilizing the skills of community-based members as volunteers helps us grow in the community. Knowledge of our programs is spread more quickly by individuals who are vested in the services because they are the service providers, as well as the consumers.
Volunteerism helps us to get established in the community and become an integral part of the community that we serve.

Finally, volunteerism provides a means of longevity for the program. The tenure of our volunteers, in many cases, is much longer than that of paid staff. Volunteers who embrace and adopt the project provide a vision for the project’s future direction and a committed labor force that withstands budget reductions.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of domestic violence victims served who report that they are living more safely and understanding the dynamics of domestic violence and how it impacts them.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Domestic Violence Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Reflects the number of anonymous satisfaction surveys returned by survivors who receive in-person court accompaniment. Surveys are not given to hotline callers or survivors receiving counseling.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Domestic Violence Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Reflects the number of volunteers and interns who provide direct services to survivors. Response does not include Board members or fundraising volunteers.

Number of community-based organizations providing primary prevention services in violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Domestic Violence Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Reflects the number of youths who participated in curriculum based primary prevention workshops to achieve a cultural shift that does not tolerate domestic violence

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Through our programs and services, the staff and volunteers of the Women’s Center of Montgomery County work to save lives, promote self-sufficiency, create institutional change and reduce the impact of domestic violence

Through the comprehensive services detailed below, we provide:
• Improved victim access to services that support victims in achieving safety, self-sufficient and independence from their abuser;
• A service delivery approach that is culturally competent and trauma informed
• Interventions that create positive systemic change and innovation

The outcomes we seek are that for our interventions to assist victims in: 1) living more safely; and 2) understanding the dynamics of domestic violence and how it impacts their choices and their lives.

Intervention Focused Services:
Counseling Services: 24-hour domestic violence hotline/crisis response; safety planning; individualized counseling; support groups; elder abuse services; information and referral to resources including therapists, lawyers and other social service providers and county assistance programs.

Legal Advocacy: court accompaniment; legal options counseling; direct advocacy for victims seeking Emergency, Temporary and Final Protection from Abuse (PFA) Orders; assistance with Indirect Criminal Complaints (violations of PFAs).
Additional services include: assistance with locating affordable and/or temporary housing, emergency cash assistance for victims escaping an abuser, Crime Victim Compensation filings, victim impact statements to the courts, and assistance locating emergency shelter.

Prevention Focused Services, Training and Systems Advocacy: Community Education to create awareness about abuse dynamics; curriculum-based programs for youths teaching non-violent behavior to break the generational cycle of violence; financial literacy workshops; legal clinics addressing custody, support eviction defense, expungement and bankruptcy; training for law enforcement on effective response protocols; skill-building training for volunteers and staff. We also utilize our monthly newsletter, social media and technology in our outreach efforts.

Medical Advocacy: training to medical providers in universal screening, identification and early intervention; technical support to hospitals developing domestic violence protocols; screening for at-risk children who witness domestic violence in their home; elder abuse screening in healthcare settings, and training for Urgent Care Centers.

Our mission is achieved in three ways:

1. Providing victims with the resources, knowledge and support that they need to make informed decisions about their safety and the options and remedies available to them. Philosophical emphasis is placed on accepting the individual as they are, supporting their choices and helping them to explore their feelings, options and the possible consequences of their decisions. In providing advocacy - medical and legal - our advocates give assurances of safety and confidentiality and encourage the individual to consent to helpful interventions.

2. Providing volunteers with opportunities, training and support to develop and utilize their talents and skills to effectively assist victims. Encouraging volunteers to go beyond their current comfort zone to meet client needs promotes personal growth and individual excellence through community service.

3. Providing community and systems partners with technical assistance and guidance to maximize their ability to assist victims appropriately. Serving as an ally in this way, we assist them in growing their organizational capacity to serve victims efficiently and appropriately.

The Women's Center of Montgomery County possesses a number of unique assets and resources. Included among these are our 1) large and committed volunteer base; 2) strategic use of technology; 3) multiple locations; 4) reputation as a quality training provider, both regionally and locally; and 5) ability to provide direct service needs of a large and diverse number of victims.

We are extremely confident that the domestic violence and crisis counseling services provided by the Women's Center meet the highest standards of excellence. Our work incorporates several researched-based practices developed specifically to address the needs of domestic violence victims, with an emphasis on a trauma-informed methodology.

The WCMC is monitored biennially by our governmental funding sources. Included in their review is our compliance with the Consolidated Standards, a Code of Ethics for programs funded under the Rights and Services Act. This code represents standards of ethical behavior for all victim services program staff in the relationships they have with those they serve, with colleagues, with the agency, with other individuals, and with the community and society as a whole. The Code is based on fundamental values and principles that are the common ground victim services providers share. These values include commitment to services, the dignity and worth of the person, integrity, competence, social justice, confidentiality, self-determination and the importance of human relationships.

We define success as ensuring that every time a victim calls or comes into our office they are assisted by a caring, empathetic, skilled, trained counselor/advocate who provides them with information and resources so that the individual is empowered to make an informed decision about how they want to proceed and made to feel supported and heard.

We believe that our program takes a relatively small financial investment and, with the dedication of partners from many sectors and a two- pronged approach combining service with training, we have a large impact on families in our community and not just their current but their future health and well-being.

Organizationally, we have re-committed to investing in efforts to restore the advocacy and social change focus upon which the Center was built. Since 1976, funding has driven us toward direct service priorities, at times at odds with our public policy, advocacy and women's empowerment initiatives. Since 2015, we are reconnecting with our early mission that promoted leadership and empowerment for women. We have begun to seek engagements and partnerships that express and encourage those values. Our goal is to redefine and re-invigorate our commitment as catalysts for social change. We will measure our success by our ability to 1) engage and mobilize our membership; 2) build consensus around issues; and 3) create relationships with our political leaders.

Financials

Womens Center of Montgomery County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Womens Center of Montgomery County

Board of directors
as of 11/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Rosemary Santulli


Board co-chair

Sandra Capps

LInda Brennan

Betsy Robinson

Sarah Maus

Madeline Lewis

Martina Ward

Marsha Levell

John Santulli

Michelle Lesher

Kathy Schlesinger

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/30/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/30/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.