Human Services

ACHIEVEability

aka ACHIEVEability   |   Philadelphia, PA   |  http://www.achieveability.org

Mission

ACHIEVEability breaks the generational cycle of poverty for low income, single parent, and homeless families through higher education, affordable housing, community and economic development, and accountability.

Ruling year info

1986

Executive Director

Ms. Jamila Harris-Morrison

Main address

35 N. 60th St.

Philadelphia, PA 19139 USA

Show more addresses

Formerly known as

Philadelphians Concerned About Housing

AchieveAbility

EIN

23-2215980

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Single Parent Agencies/Services (P42)

Economic Development (S30)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

• Philadelphia has the worst poverty rate among the 10 largest US cities at 26%, this rises to 37% for female-headed single-parent families.
• Between 2000 and 2014, the average annual family income in Haddington fell from $29,300 (adjusted for inflation) to $13,183.
• In the 19139 zip code, 37% of residents fall below the poverty line.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family Self-Sufficiency Program

The Family Self-Sufficiency Program (FSSP), the flagship transformational program at the heart of our mission, focuses on moving single parent families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness to self-sufficiency by offering reduced rent (in one of the more than 200 housing units we have developed) and support services, while the parents commit to work, go to school and engage in personal development. In FY15, FSSP worked with 147 participants and their 279 children. Our theory of change: stable housing as a foundation; formal education as a pathway out of poverty; and a multi-disciplinary approach utilizing our four program pillars (finance and employment, education, personal development and parenting).

One third of FSSP families come directly from a shelter or transitional housing program, while the remaining families are at-risk of homelessness. After a thorough admissions process, families move into one of ACHIEVEability's subsidized rental units. During intake, FSSP administers its Self-Sufficiency Matrix, which measures each participant on a scale from "In-Crisis" to "Thriving" in each pillar. FSSP Coaches and participants use this information to develop an individualized plan based on the participant's strengths. Through case management participants work with the Coach to implement their self-sufficiency plan. Participants are required to work and go to school while we provide a "hand up" so that participants can become self-sufficient. FSSP provides a wide range of other services to both parents and their children, including:
• Academic advising
• Connection to mainstream benefits
• Financial education: budgeting, saving, credit repair, an Individual Development Accounts program
• Drug and alcohol counseling
• Mental health counseling
• Life skills workshops (parenting; health; relationships; time management; home maintenance)

Families stay in the program for as long as they make progress in achieving their goals or up to one year after completion of a Bachelor’s degree. Self-sufficiency is defined as exiting FSSP with a post-secondary degree, living wage and at a "Safe" level or above on the Self-Sufficiency Matrix.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Homeless

ACHIEVEabilitya's Community Services Office (CSO) serves as a central location and one-stop shop for residents of West Philadelphia, providing a comprehensive and coordinated approach to solving the range of problems facing these families. Specific services include:
• Housing - foreclosure diversion, emergency rent and mortgage assistance, IDA program
• Utilities - LIHEAP and Utility Emergency Services Fund of Philadelphia applications; serves as a Neighborhood Energy Center
• Income tax preparation
• Financial Empowerment Center - financial counseling and workshops with a Clarifi counselor, employment coaching
• Computer lab

Haddington and Cobbs Creek are two of Philadelphia's poorest and most underserved neighborhoods. In FY2015, the Community Services Office served 4,680 unduplicated individuals.

The CSO convenes the Neighborhood Advisory Council, through which residents can organize, access, plan and implement activities and utilize information that contributes to achieving a healthy, vibrant, and hopeful community. The CSO is responsible for ensuring the 60th Street Commercial Corridor and neighborhood vacant lots are cleaned.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
None

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

602 volunteers from corporate, community, and non-profit partners provided 7,000 hours of volunteer services in FY15.

Number of homebuyers/tenants with low incomes receiving housing subsidies as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Self-Sufficiency Program

Context Notes

ACHIEVEability has the capacity to serve 130 families at a time. The average stay for program participants in the Family Self-Sufficiency Program is 5 years.

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance to keep the lights, heat and/or water on in their homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Community Services Office

Context Notes

146 residents received emergency utility assistance, totaling over $51,000 of aid. Additionally, 287 households at risk of losing their homes were served under the Foreclosure Diversion Program.

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Family Self-Sufficiency Program

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

• Family Self-Sufficiency Program (FSSP) - Help families become self-sufficient. Each year, we help 120 low income, single parent, and homeless families to transform their lives through affordable housing; the parents' pursuit of college degrees or equivalent vocational credentials; development of parenting, financial, home management, and other life skills; the pursuit of overall personal development; and the well-rounded development and academic achievement of children and youth.<br/><br/>• Community Services - Strengthen and empower community residents. Last year, we helped approximately 2,000 neighborhood residents with basic needs and stabilization, skill-building, technology, leadership development, and civic engagement.<br/><br/>• Economic Development - Improve the physical and economic well-being of the community - Engage in real estate development in West Philadelphia with our partner, Mission First Housing Group, and neighborhood beautification and cleanliness, especially on the 60th Street Commercial Corridor.

• Human capital development, with the pursuit of higher education as our program's foundation. Accountability is the backbone of our approach, with evidence-based practices as the core, and data management as a driver of innovation<br/><br/>• Community and economic development - civic engagement and leadership development are key.<br/><br/>• Research - we partner with the academic community to document, validate, and enhance our programs and to share our learning

• Comprehensive and integrated social support services<br/><br/>• Community engagement<br/><br/>• Community-based participatory research<br/><br/>• Organizational and neighborhood strategic planning

• Number of parents who complete college or equivalent vocational credits<br/><br/>• Number of parents who complete their associate's or bachelor's degrees or who complete equivalent postsecondary vocational credentials<br/><br/>• Number of parents who maintain or advance in their employment or who find employment (if unemployed or underemployed)<br/><br/>• Number of families who increase their levels of self-sufficiency, as measured by the ACHIEVEability Self-Sufficiency Matrix<br/><br/>• Number of families who achieve safe or thriving levels, as measured by the ACHIEVEability Self-Sufficiency Matrix<br/><br/>• Number of residents who fill their basic or stabilization needs or increase their incomes through supports from our Community Services Office<br/><br/>• Number of residents who participate in neighborhood events and projects<br/><br/>• % change in bags of trash picked up between months on commercial corridor

KEY FY17 OUTCOMES<br/><br/>FSSP-<br/>• 81% of families who transitioned out of the program moved into permanent housing.<br/>• 13 parents earned degrees (3 bachelors, 10 associates)<br/>• 69% of parents attained higher education<br/><br/><br/>CSO-<br/>• Served 1,782 individuals through 5,830 points of service<br/>• 641 individuals received free tax preparation with 252 connected to EITC<br/>• 6 community residents becoming first-time home buyers through participation in the Individual Development Account program<br/>• More than 1,500 community residents attended our Second Annual Community Summer Jam

Financials

ACHIEVEability
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ACHIEVEability

Board of directors
as of 6/6/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Tim Thornton

Philly 311


Board co-chair

Mr. Arnold Johnson

Bank of America

Joel Lawson

Anthony Schweiger

The Tomorrow Group, LLC

Tish Squillaro

CANDOR Consulting

William J. Stickney

Grant Thornton, LLP

Bruce Shook

Intact Vascular, Inc.

Mary Walker

PECO

Alfredo Pena

Mission First Housing

Donna Liggon

Senior Change Mgmt. Consultant

Joe Heastie

Castrol Americas, BP

Keith Jones

Mark Deitcher

Mission First Housing Group

Shannon Farmer

Ballard Spahr

Sue McMonigle

Johnson & Johnson

Alan Casnoff

P&A Associates

Donna Higgins

Higgins Group, Inc.

Jim Mogan III

Reed Smith LLP

Karen McClendon

Comcast Cable

Malik Brown

Peirce College

Ted Torphy

BioMotiv, LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Keywords

PCAH, Housing, real estate, homeless, community, poverty, family, children, youth, self-sufficiency, education, social services, technology, community development, economic development