PLATINUM2023

iDE

Powering Entrepreneurs to End Poverty

aka International Development Enterprises   |   Denver, CO   |  www.ideglobal.org

Mission

Powering entrepreneurs to end poverty. iDE creates income and livelihood opportunities for poor rural households. We design and deliver market-based solutions in Agriculture and WASH in 10 countries across Asia, Africa, and Central America. Much more than a collection of technologies and field offices, we are a globally integrated ecosystem of over 1,200 staff, passionate about innovation and entrepreneurism.

Ruling year info

1983

Chief Executive Officer

Elizabeth Ellis

Main address

1031 33rd Street Suite 270

Denver, CO 80205 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-2220051

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

International Agricultural Development (Q31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the UN Development Programme Sustainable Development Goals, "about 736 million people still live on less than US$1.90 a day; many lack adequate food, clean drinking water and sanitation. Rapid economic growth in countries such as China and India has lifted millions out of poverty, but progress has been uneven. Women are more likely to live in poverty than men due to unequal paid work opportunities, education and property. Progress has also been limited in other regions, such as South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, which account for 80 percent of those living in extreme poverty. New threats brought on by climate change, conflict and food insecurity, mean even more work is needed to bring people out of poverty."

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Agriculture

As our global population grows, improving small-scale farmers’ productivity is key to ensuring food security. Small-scale farmers generate 80% of the food in rural areas, yet they represent 70% of the world’s poor and lack the techniques, technologies, and mindset that could enable them to turn subsistence farming into productive small farm businesses.

iDE’s goal in agriculture is to have a large and lasting impact on the incomes and well-being of small-scale farmers. To our donors, we strive for a minimum cost-effectiveness ratio of 10:1. We are able to do this through innovative programs that create cadres of microentrepreneurs, support small businesses, and build resilient markets that support their sales.

Population(s) Served
Farmers
Economically disadvantaged people

2.5 billion people, or over 30% of the planet, do not have access to proper sanitation. 1.6 million people die every year due to diarrheal-related disease; most of them are children under five. 88% of these deaths can be attributed to unsafe water and hygiene practices.

iDE’s goal in WASH is to make radical improvements in health, nutrition, and productivity of rural people through the reduction of diarrheal-related disease. Since we began promoting markets for WASH, over 8 million individuals now have access to clean drinking water, improved toilets, and more knowledge about how to improve the health of their families.

iDE’s WASH Initiative builds markets for products that have the potential to transform people’s health by preventing diarrheal-related disease. We work with businesses to produce and sell clean water filters, toilets, and handwashing devices that are affordable and desirable to poor rural customers.

We use human-centered design to inform our implementation approach, product designs, and business models. We start with the customer’s journey, addressing barriers, influencers, and motivators to behavior change. This involves optimizing the purchase experience, sales strategies, and the use of microfinance. Then, we design business models that are profitable enough to attract entrepreneurs into the market.

While our goal of a thriving market is the same, each market requires a different business model and exit strategy depending on the dynamics of the local context. We aim for 100% national coverage wherever we work. Together with our partners, we conduct the research and design necessary to innovate new WASH products and prove business viability to both local entrepreneurs and multinational corporations.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Climate & Resilience is one of the major cross-sectional tactics at the heart of iDE. iDE recognizes that climate change disproportionately affects the vulnerable communities that we work with. iDE employs a variety of different tools and approaches to improve the resilience of communities to climate shocks and stresses based on the different contexts that we work in. In each of these cases we establish systems (market-based or governance-based) to ensure that the activities and benefits continue after project funding ends.

The tactics that comprise the Climate & Resilience Sector at iDE range from creating sustainable markets, to promoting the latest best practices and climate-smart products, to measuring the market systems that we work in in order to better understand challenges and opportunities, to linking lessons learned and best practices from the field into regional, national and international for a wider experience sharing.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average change in income of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Annual income increased or savings realized in dollars as a result of iDE's WASH or Agriculture programs.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of individuals that iDE has impacted since it's founding in 1982.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

iDE aims to end poverty, not just make incremental improvements. To do so, we must power millions of people who now live on $2 or less a day to profit from the marketplace. Working in the areas of agriculture and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene), iDE designs business models that embrace the poor as business owners, sales agents, producers, and employees–creating a self-sustaining climate of economic and social opportunity. In our first 29 years, we increased income and livelihood opportunities for 20 million people living in extreme poverty. In 2015, we set a goal to double that number in a fraction of the time. As 2022 came to a close, we had reached over 38 million people, and despite the global pandemic, we’re less than 2 million away from our goal of creating lasting change for 40 million people.

iDE employs a strategy built upon the following four pillars:

Start with People -
People are more likely to invest their money in a solution that comes from their own ideas and desires. Using Human-Centered Design, we make no assumptions about what people want or what the final solution should look like. Instead, we develop a deep understanding of people's lives to inspire our designs and market-based ideas. By asking first, we reduce risk and achieve success that is sustainable and scalable.

Design to Context -
Solutions to alleviate poverty and improve livelihoods aren't universal. They have to be tailored to meet local contexts: social, cultural, political, and environmental.

We also focus on technology design that fits within the context of each particular farm, village, region, and country. We design and promote resource-smart technology that acknowledges local challenges and strives to make the most of limited funds, energy, labor, and water.

Business Delivers -
The poor work hard: growing food, tending a market stall, pouring cement into a latrine mold. Today they are struggling to get by, but with training, tools, and opportunities, they can become successful employees, sales agents, business operators, and entrepreneurs.

We mobilize the private sector by building a strong business case for marketing to the poor. By sharing decades of lessons from successes and failures and ever-changing customer insights, we reduce the risk and challenge of market entry for businesses of all sizes. We take special care to ensure that we're building markets that can continue to strengthen after we move on, and are inclusive of marginalized people—those without access to land, capital, or information.

Where markets are so broken that basic market infrastructure does not exist, iDE creates financially viable social enterprises that are dedicated to social, environmental, and financial goals.

Results Rule -
The first phone many Africans use is a cell phone. It's been cheaper and easier for developing countries to build cell towers than to string wires between rural homes. At iDE, we're building on that technological leap to radically transform the lives of the poor—pioneering a dynamic cloud-based information system that connects every segment of our operations. This real-time data allows us to quickly prioritize investments that work and eliminate those that don't.

We rigorously evaluate our programs to measure how well our activities contribute to our mission of increasing incomes and improving lives. Every evaluation receives a score that represents the credibility of the research methods used to estimate that impact. Based on this score, evaluations are weighted when estimating the impact for each initiative within our portfolio. Our Evidence and Analytics team constantly invests in rigorous internal impact evaluations and reviews external research and impact assessments to obtain defensible and comprehensive results to measure our success.

Using Human-Centered Design, iDE develops a deep understanding of people's lives to inspire our designs and market-based ideas. “Innovation is hard," says Nadia Campos, a designer in iDE's Phnom Penh Cambodia office. “It takes people, it takes time, it takes money. But you have to do it. Because if you don't, you fail."

In order to design solutions to the unique contexts where we work, our organizational structure is intentionally decentralized, allowing for visionary leadership in the field, not just back at headquarters. Our country directors live in the countries they support. They lead teams that are constantly in contact with our clients. And once we start designing solutions for a need, we are committed to staying in that country until we have achieved our goals.

We also mobilize the private sector by building a strong business case for marketing to the poor. By sharing decades of lessons from successes and failures and ever-changing customer insights, we reduce the risk and challenge of market entry for businesses of all sizes. We take special care to ensure that we're building markets that can continue to strengthen after we move on, and are inclusive of marginalized people—those without access to land, capital, or information. Where markets are so broken that basic market infrastructure does not exist, iDE creates financially viable social enterprises that are dedicated to social, environmental, and financial goals.

Lastly, iDE is pioneering a dynamic cloud-based information system that connects every segment of our operations, from the mobile phone of a latrine sales agent in rural Cambodia, to the Country Director's laptop in Phnom Penh, to the operations team in our Denver, Colorado headquarters. This integration enables us to have real-time data so we can analyze the quality, reliability, and cost-effectiveness of our programs towards targets and key performance indicators. But more importantly, it helps customers get their toilets delivered faster and cheaper. Real-time data allows us to quickly prioritize investments that work and eliminate those that don't.

To date, we have reached more than 38 million people on three continents. Through iDE's agriculture and WASH initiatives, people experience an average annual increase in income or savings of $258. We are committed to ensuring that every dollar invested by donors becomes at least $10 in added income or savings for our clients when calculated as a global average. In 2022 our Social Return on Investment (SROI) was 12.5. SROI is the ratio of money spent by iDE relative to the aggregate increased or saved income generated by participating households calculated with a three-year rolling average of our impact and scale indicators for each project in each country-program.

Since 1982, we have introduced and scaled technology that benefits poor, rural customers. Starting with the treadle pump, we've introduced drip irrigation systems, solar pumps, seeds and tillers, and other resource-smart technology that improves the efficiency and income of rural farmers. We've also collaborated with private corporations to build affordable WASH technologies, such as the Super Tunsai water filter, handwashing stations, and hygienic latrines.

However, we don't just introduce technologies and hope for the marketplace to accept them. We've built a model to ensure the technology is desirable to customers, feasible to build in the context, and viable in the marketplace.

Where markets are so broken that basic market infrastructure does not exist, we create financially viable social enterprises that are dedicated to social, environmental, and financial goals. Hydrologic, iDE's water filter social enterprise in Cambodia, has reached financial sustainability, and Sama Sama, iDE’s social business in Ghana catalyzes sanitation and hygiene markets by integrating the entire sanitation value chain.

What we don't capture—yet—is the longer term economic impact of our interventions: the result of establishing sustainable markets that remain after our program and investments have ended.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

iDE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

iDE

Board of directors
as of 07/27/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Robert Hill

Hill & Robbins, P.C.

Thomas Ebling

Demandware

William A Fast

Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary

Judith Hermanson

IHC Group

Mark Fitzgerald

KPMG

Gerry Dyck

Kalora Interiors International

Lee Addams

Ernst & Young

Rick Mazur

RLG International

Rick Kwan

Primrose Hill Partners

Joyce King Thomas

McCann XBC

Chandra A. Madramootoo

McGill University

Len Penner

iDE Canada

Linda Porter-Cox

The AND Group

Ted Paetkau

Concord Projects

Ana Ximenes

Four2One, Inc.

Shashwat Jha

Barclays Capital

Alix Lebec

Lebec Consulting

Dr. Venkata Kishore

Bayer Crop Science

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/24/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.