Family Support Line of Delaware County, Inc.

We care. We listen. We act.

aka FSL   |   Media, PA   |  http://www.familysupportline.org/

Mission

Family Support Line’s core mission is to advance the prevention and treatment of child sexual abuse. Our continuum of services helps children and families get the help they need to be safe, heal, break the cycle of abuse, and thrive. It also helps ensure that professionals who work with children and families have the support, training, and resources they need to recognize and respond to allegations of abuse, as well as meet the needs of children and families affected by sexual abuse.

Ruling year info

1989

Executive Director

Sarah Gibbons

Main address

100 West 6th St Suite 1

Media, PA 19063 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-2528819

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The prevalence of child sexual abuse is difficult to determine because sexual abuse, molestation, and rape are culturally shame-filled concepts, and, thus, reports of this type of abuse often go unreported. Child sexual abuse is not limited to physical contact; it includes exposure, taking sexually explicit or provocative photos or showing pornography or sexually suggestive photos to a child, and/or voyeurism. The social stigma is further complicated by the non-uniform reporting by law enforcement agencies. We do know from the Pennsylvania Child Protective Service Report that, statewide, child sexual abuse crimes are the highest substantiated type of abuse. Nearly half of all substantiated child abuse reports—47.5%—are sexual abuse. If not treated, the trauma of child sexual abuse can become a mental health issue. Left untreated the trauma can manifest as lack of trust towards adults, low self-esteem, difficulty coping with stress, anger, and/or self-harm.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family Support Line

Preventing the Harm – Giving children and teens the tools to help them stay safe.

Training the Healers - Offering workshops that explore advancements in the treatment of sexual trauma.

Healing the Hurt – Helping victims become survivors through support groups and counseling services.

Coordinating the Response –Ensuring children will have the best environment to disclose their stories.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Preventing the Harm – Giving children and teens the tools to help them stay safe.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Helping victims become survivors through support groups and counseling services.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Ensuring children will have the best environment to disclose their stories. The Delaware County Children's Advocacy Center is a program of Family Support Line and received full accreditation from the National Children's Alliance on July 20, 2016.

The DCCAC benefits Delaware County Children by limiting the number of times a child has to tell about abuse. CACs also have been shown to reduce the need for children to testify in court, increase successful prosecution of child abusers, and make it easier for families to navigate the criminal justice system.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations


Since 2011

National Children's Alliance Full Member 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new organizations signing on as collaborators

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers

Related Program

Coordinating the Response

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Family Support Line’s most valued asset is our relationships with the many agencies serving Delaware County. These relationships help us do the important work of helping children recover from abuse.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers

Related Program

Healing the Hurt

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We provide specialized individual and group therapy, as well as psychosocial programs for children that have been sexually abused and their caregivers.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers

Related Program

Family Support Line

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Family Support Line provides prevention education, forensic interviews, and specialized therapy and referrals to other programs/services for children who have been sexually abused.

Number of undesirable activities stopped

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers

Related Program

Coordinating the Response

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Family Support Line's Delaware County Children's Advocacy Center provides forensic interviews for suspected child abuse. We coordinate with law enforcement to stop the abuse.

Number of cases monitored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers

Related Program

Coordinating the Response

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Family Support Line's Family Advocates and therapists monitor and provide services to clients for as long as needed which, when the courts are involved, can be several years to resolve.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Family Support Line strives to improve the quality of life and provide hope to children who have been sexually abused. We do this by providing a continuum of care—prevention education, specialized treatment, professional training, and victim advocacy—to help sexually abused children quickly find hope and healing. Our programs and services emphasize that sexual abuse is never the child’s fault.

The long-term effects of the trauma of sexual abuse has been well-documented in the literature. Left untreated the trauma can manifest as lack of trust towards adults, low self-esteem, difficulty coping with stress, anger, eating disorders, self-harm, including suicidality, and/or substance abuse. Our message is simple: Help is available; healing is possible.

Specialized treatment can reduce sexual trauma symptoms and the risk of developing secondary health problems. However, prevention is far-more health-enhancing and cost-effective. At Family Support Line we believe that abuse prevention education is an investment in our community because the aftermath of child sexual abuse can be physically, mentally, and financially disastrous to the child-victim, families, and the community-at-large. To this end, Family Support Line has been delivering prevention education programs for more than 25 years. Our prevention education programs provide children with the tools to stay safe, avoid sexual abuse, and learn how to report abuse or attempts of abuse. We also teach adults how to recognize and report child sexual abuse.

Our Specialized Treatment Programs offer counseling and therapy for sexual abuse victims and their families. To effect healing in an age-appropriate setting, our groups are based on age to help children and teens recover from sexual abuse.

Our Delaware County Children’s Advocacy Center (DCCAC) is fully accredited by the National Children’s Alliance. The DCCAC’s effective, efficient, and child-centered approach is designed to improve long-term outcomes for child victims. Through the DCCAC, we are working toward a world in which it is easy for child sexual abuse victims to: confidently disclose their abuse; find systems responsive to their needs and those of their families, so that they are not re-traumatized; access the specialized treatments services that will help them heal; and be protected from re-victimization.

Although they are not easily accomplished, our goals are simple and straightforward: to provide prevention education to as many children in Delaware County as possible; coordinate investigations of the sexual victimization of children; reduce the risk of re-traumatizing child victims that stem from multiple and uncoordinated interviews; help families navigate the confusing law enforcement and social services systems; and to make sure children and families get the services they need.

Our programs reflect the recognition that child sexual abuse can be emotionally, socially, physically, and financially disastrous to child-victims, families, and the community. We provide treatment and advocacy services to all members of a family who have experienced sexual abuse creating an environment of support and understanding that leads to a full recovery. For example, research shows that the most important predictor of recovery is the support of a primary caretaker. A disclosure of abuse by one child is a crisis for the entire family. By having the whole family involved in treatment, it shows solidarity, helps establish trust, and promotes healing from this trauma. To this end, we also offer a group for parents/caregivers, as well as a group for siblings and other children in the victims’ household.

Family Support Line’s Prevention Education programs reach children, parents, teachers, as well as the entire community at schools, health fairs and community events providing us with a unique opportunity to reach the community at different levels. The programs equip children, parents, and professionals with tools needed to identify abuse and take appropriate action.

The Delaware County Children’s Advocacy Center (DCCAC) is a gateway program for our services and receives referrals from our collaborators. The design of DCCAC involved the development of intersystem coordination of multiple systems which, in Delaware County, includes 70 entities. With partners from the Children & Youth Services; District Attorney’s Office, Special Victims Division and Criminal Investigation Division; along with local law enforcement, we crafted protocols for reports of child sexual abuse, serious physical abuse and child who are witnesses to crime which use the DCCAC for a specialized interview, intersystem coordination and victim advocacy.

Our professional training program allows us to reach well beyond our walls by training professionals to recognize the signs of abuse, understand the need for specialized trauma treatment, and how to respond appropriately. Currently, our professional training offerings focus on the needs of the partner agencies working with us on the DCCAC’s multidisciplinary investigative team.

Family Support Line’s major activities include:

1. Providing sexual abuse prevention education to children, parents/caretakers, teachers and other professionals.
2. Coordinating the multidisciplinary response to an allegation of child sexual abuse and serious physical abuse.
3. Reducing the risk of re-traumatizing child victims who have disclosed abuse.
4. Helping child victims’ families navigate the systems involved in child sexual abuse cases and avoid “falling through the cracks.”

Founded in 1984 by a group of professionals and private citizens inspired by a mother’s struggle to access the specialized treatment services her child needed after being sexually abused, Family Support Line incorporated in 1988. In 1990, we convened the Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Task Group, bringing together community members and professionals to strategically address this issue. This led to the development of our Prevention Education Program.

We continually survey our prevention education attendees and use the results to modify our education programs to meet current needs, risks, and attitudes. Our deep relationships within the community—schools, law enforcement, other professionals—also keeps us up to date on new trends. Based on important input from the children and community, our offerings address a range of topics, including sexual abuse, sexual harassment, bullying, healthy relationships, child trafficking, and cybersafety.

In 1997, we created the Therapy Network Program to provide specialized individual and family therapy to augment the group support services. The Network was comprised of private practice therapists with special expertise.

In 2003, we began offering professional training for behavioral health care professionals, through collaborations with Widener University. Today, our professional training offerings focus on the needs of the partner agencies working with us on the Delaware County Children’s Advocacy Center (DCCAC)’s multidisciplinary investigative team.

In 2015, we opened the DCCAC to help ensure that the needs of child victims came first. Accredited in 2016, the DCCAC follows the ten standards of the National Children’s Alliance (NCA). Following evidence-based practices, the standards help children heal from the abuse. The standards are evaluated regularly by the NCA and appropriate changes are made. As an accredited CAC, we adopt these best practices and, by following them, provide the following services:
• child forensic interviews,
• trauma focused treatment,
• referral to medical services,
• victim advocacy,
• multidisciplinary case review, and
• case management and tracking.
The opening of the DCCAC prompted significant reconfiguration of our treatment program, including the dissolution of most of the Therapy Network and the hiring of a Therapist/Educator. This change allowed us to provide interventions on-site and closer in time to abuse discovery/disclosure, thus reducing long-term negative effects. In 2017, we also began offering school-based Psychoeducation sessions for child victims struggling with emotional regulation.

Our biggest assets—our committed staff and the multidisciplinary team of partner agencies—is also a large part of our capability. Family Support Line has an executive director, 2 experienced program directors, 2 child forensic interviewers, 2 family advocates, 70 partner agencies, a committed board, support staff, and others who implement and administer our programs every day.

In fiscal year ending 2019, we served more than 6,000 clients:
• Prevention education served 5,637 unduplicated participants at 298 events and 49 venues.
• Professional training programs reached 231 unduplicated participants.
• The Delaware County Children’s Advocacy Center (DCCAC) conducted 386 forensic interviews.
• We provided 101 psychoeducation/mindfulness sessions.
• We provided 538 individual/family therapy sessions.
• The DCCAC provided 1,570 service points as part of its case management.

The DCCAC is up for reaccreditation in 2020 and we will be required to submit its application for reaccreditation by June 2020. We are actively working on the application.

Unfortunately, the needs for our services continue to rise. Going forward, we will carefully monitor our staffing requirements with the needs for services. Additionally, we will continue to use our evaluation tools to guide us on necessary staffing and program enhancements and modifications.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Family Support Line reconfigured its Treatment Program to deliver screening services closer to the time the child received services from the Delaware County Children's Advocacy Center. This reconfiguration has allowed us to better serve our clients by providing treatment and/or making referrals for specialized services.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Family Support Line of Delaware County, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Family Support Line of Delaware County, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/10/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Grant Gegwich

Independence Blue Cross

Louis Robinson

Mitch Vidovich

Sherry Smyth

Meg Grant

Jonathan Becker

Jennifer Furjanic

Keighan Gunther

Sandra Lutz, CPA

Curtis Sayers

Kevin Smith

Lori Trevlyn

Danielle Yoch

Drew Miller

Katherine Parghi

Michael Lynch

Mike Ranck

Shawn Lacy

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/25/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/25/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.