PLATINUM2023

Project HOME

None of us are home until all of us are home

Philadelphia, PA   |  www.projecthome.org

Mission

The mission of the Project HOME community is to empower adults, children, and families to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty, to alleviate the underlying causes of poverty, and to enable all of us to attain our fullest potential as individuals and as members of the broader society. We strive to create a safe and respectful environment where we support each other in our struggles for self-esteem, recovery, and the confidence to move toward self-actualization.

Ruling year info

1989

President and Executive Director

S. Mary Scullion

Associate Executive Director and Chief Financial Officer

Joan Dawson McConnon

Main address

1515 Fairmount Ave

Philadelphia, PA 19130 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-2555950

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Project HOME is committed to ending and preventing chronic homelessness and poverty in the City of Philadelphia.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Project HOME

Project HOME provides a continuum of care of services comprised of street outreach, supportive housing facilities and comprehensive services including health care, education and employment. We also work to prevent homelessness through comprehensive neighborhood-based revitalization.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Project HOME provides housing and residential services at 21 residences across Philadelphia, ranging in service levels from low-barrier, highly-staffed housing to more independent affordable housing, all connected to additional services through targeted case management. We offer a variety of permanent supportive housing throughout the city, including communal settings; independent-living in single-room occupancy, studio, or one-bedroom apartments; and two residences serving larger families.

We offer specialized programming for higher-risk subpopulations, including young adults and those affected by the opioid crisis, providing a community of caring, a focus on education and employment, and a range of life skills education.

Project HOME has developed 1,038 units of affordable and supportive housing for persons who have experienced homelessness and low-income persons at-risk of homelessness; there are an additional 40 units under construction and 64 units in the pipeline.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Project HOME provides basic job readiness training, individualized supports, certifications in high-demand professions, and connections to local employers. Programs help participants secure employment at a living wage by integrating job placement services with certificate trainings and job coaching.

Initiatives include:

Social Enterprise: Hourly, entry-level employment experiences for high-barrier residents to practice work routines and communication skills in a therapeutic setting. HOMEspun Boutique consignment store; HOMEmade, which produces hand-crafted products including candles and art; and HOMEbooks, our online bookstore.

Employment Services: One-on-one assistance with career planning, job searches, applications, interview preparation, and job-site coaching.

Adult Learning and Workforce Development: Basic skills training and industry-specific certifications, including Certified Peer Specialist, ServSafe, Forklift, Practical Computer Skills for the Workforce, Customer Service.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Project HOME Health Services (PHHS) provides a whole-person, integrated model of care that puts low-income and homeless patients at the center of an integrated team of medical professionals. PHHS provides a range of services at our Stephen Klein Wellness Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center: primary care, behavioral healthcare, dental care, pre-and perinatal care, nutrition and wellness, a YMCA fitness center with child care services, physical therapy, pharmacy, and medication assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. In addition to satellite locations at the Hub of Hope in Suburban Station and Pathways to Housing, our new Epstein Street Medicine program brings primary care coordination to those on the streets in the Kensington neighborhood. PHHS is the nexus of health and wellness services in our medically underserved Lower North Philadelphia neighborhood and for Philadelphians recovering from homelessness, mental illness, and substance use disorder across the city.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

The Honickman Learning Center and Comcast Technology Labs (HLCCTL), located in Lower North Philadelphia, is a 38,000 square foot, state-of-the art learning center. Programs for children and youth including afterschool and summer programming for students in grades K-12 that provides critically needed academic, technology, and arts programming. Programming is specifically tailored to prevent summer learning loss and improve academic skills in reading, math, science, and technology. Students in our Teen Program are additionally provided with opportunities to develop employment skills through paid internships and are supported through the process of preparing for, applying to, and succeeding in post-secondary education through the College Access Program.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total Number of Residents Housed at Project HOME (Cumulative During Fiscal Year)

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Project HOME’s Strategic Plan Goals for FY23-FY25 are:

Coming Home: Increasing and preserving housing units and expanding access to end and prevent chronic street homelessness.

Beloved Community: Supporting community members to have opportunities to thrive and feel a sense of belonging in a safe, welcoming environment. This includes healthcare, employment, education, and outreach programs that strengthen the economic social, physical and mental well-being of participants, along with engagement activities and support for increased housing stability.

Anti-Racist Organization: Continuing the work to become anti-racist and inclusive, ensuring our diverse staff feel they belong, grow professionally, and are empowered to succeed.

Financial Sustainability: Ensuring we are financially resilient and sustainable, with sufficient resources and appropriate technology to support the needs of our residents, participants, and staff. goals.

Coming Home Strategies:
- Expand, preserve, and improve and our housing portfolio and services.
- Engage city, state, and federal officials and agencies to increase public resources and policies to end chronic street homelessness.
- Build trusting relationships to help people currently living on the street access resources and housing.

Beloved Community Strategies:
- Our healthcare, employment, education, and outreach programs and services strengthen the economic, social, physical and mental well-being of participants.
- Increase housing stability through preventative supports, use of data, and best practices.
- Create opportunities for us to engage with each other through activities, gatherings, and celebrations.

Anti-Racist Organization Strategies:
- Embed DEI practices at the core of our culture.
- Build learning pathways and professional development opportunities for promotion.
- Improve staff retention and recruiting practices.

Financial Sustainability Strategies:
- Complete and execute a 5- year operating and 15-year capital business plan.
- Monitor department revenue and expenses to operate within budget.
- Receive the best value for purchased goods and services from a diverse pool of vendors.

For more than 30 years, Project HOME has been working to fill gaps in resources for those experiencing or at risk of homelessness in Philadelphia. We have grown from a single winter respite to 21 residences of supportive housing plus outreach, employment, medical care, and education, providing whole-person care that addresses the root causes of poverty and homelessness. In FY22, 94 percent of our residents in permanent housing maintained stable housing, and 49 percent of those in low-barrier safe havens moved into more independent or appropriate housing.

Participant feedback and community engagement drive our work. Project HOME residents and alumni serve on our Board of Directors and give us real-time feedback and leadership through Resident Advisory Board meetings. Project HOME intentionally hires individuals with lived experience relatable to our residents and diverse backgrounds. Our leaders have long experience in their fields.

In 2022, Project HOME was awarded a 5-year, $3.5 million Growth Grant from Pew Charitable Trusts as part of their second cohort of awardees. This grant focuses on services for Project HOME’s increased supportive housing, expanding access to supports and treatment for substance use disorder, strengthening Project HOME’s plans for long-term sustainability, and supporting Project HOME’s integration of DEI throughout every aspect of our work.

As of FY23, Project HOME has developed 1,038 units of affordable and supportive housing for persons who have experienced homelessness and low-income persons at-risk of homelessness; there are an additional 40 units under construction and 64 units in the pipeline. Community services include Helen Brown Community Center, The Honickman Learning Center and Comcast Technology Labs, Stephen Klein Wellness Center, and the Hub of Hope homelessness engagement center in Suburban Station.

In 2023, Project HOME is opening Inn of Amazing Mercy in the Kensington neighborhood, the epicenter of the region’s opioid epidemic. The Inn provides recovery-focused permanent supportive housing with 50 efficiencies and 12 low-barrier respite beds for those coming in directly from the streets. It also serves as a hub for our Epstein Street Medicine program, which combines street outreach with primary care delivered on the streets. In addition to addressing urgent clinical concerns, this is the only mobile team in Philadelphia addressing preventive care and medical health care issues for unsheltered individuals, offered right where they are.

Project HOME’s MPOWER partnership celebrated 10 years of leveraging a powerful network of private support to accelerate our work and multiply our impact. This Community Investment Partnership focuses in five key areas: investments, relationships, resources, advocacy, and evidence. In less than a decade MPOWER has multiplied Project HOME’s impact by 163 percent, leveraged $25 million into more than $250 million, and built nine new residential programs, doubling Project HOME’s capacity.

Project HOME envisions a society where everyone has a place to call home and is given the opportunity and resources to flourish and achieve their fullest potential. Our vision is that “None of us are home until all of us are home.”

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Project HOME
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Project HOME

Board of directors
as of 03/14/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Estelle Richman

Joan Dawson McConnon

CFO/Project HOME

Mary Scullion

Executive Director/Project HOME

Deborah Fretz

Sunoco Logistics (retired)

Lori Lasher

The J.G. Wentworth Company

Estelle Richman

Housing and Urban Development (retired)

Thomas Walker, Jr.

Project HOME Alumnae, MANNA

Joyce Wilkerson

School District of Philadelphia

Megan Maguire Nicoletti

The Maguire Foundation

Joanne Berwind

Financial Management, Philanthropist

Jeff Cook

Pepsi-Cola & National Brand Beverages, Ltd.

Caitlin Ferry

Brown Brothers Harriman & Co.

Leigh Middleton

Philanthropist

Wes Mitchell

Project HOME Resident, Certified Peer Specialist

Marcel Pratt

Ballard Spahr

Jim Smith

Blank Rome

Gus Gray

Project HOME Resident, Meg Saligman Studios

Joyce Hagan

Retired, Merrill Lynch

Bridget Jacobs

Former Project HOME Resident

Marc Jenkins

PNC

Lisette Martinez

Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson Health

John McDonald

PECO

Dainette Mintz

Urban Affairs Coalition

Norma Reichlin

Business & Financial Analyst, College Admissions Consultant

Amy Riley

Comcast Corporation

Hank Hockeimer

Ballard Spahr

Juanita Jones

Project HOME Resident

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/09/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.