Canine Partners for Life

Making the miracle of independence possible

aka CPL   |   Cochranville, PA   |  https://k94life.org/

Mission

The mission of Canine Partners for Life is to increase the independence and quality of life of individuals with physical, developmental, and cognitive disabilities or who are in other situations of need.  We achieve our mission by providing and sustaining professionally trained service and companion dogs.

Ruling year info

1990

Executive Director

Mrs. Janie Cramer

Main address

PO Box 170

Cochranville, PA 19330 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-2580658

NTEE code info

Animal Training, Behavior (D61)

Epilepsy (G54)

Management & Technical Assistance (G02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Service Dogs

Canine Partners for Life specializes in training service dogs for individuals with a wide range of physical and cognitive disabilities. CPL’s service dogs go through an intense two-year training program. In addition to learning advanced obedience and social skills, they learn techniques to help people with disabilities meet the challenges of daily living. During their second year of training, each dog is paired with a human partner. At that point, each dog’s training is tailored to
meet the needs of their future partner.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Home Companion dogs are placed with individuals who
CPL feels would benefit from a well-trained companion,
but would have difficulty raising and training a dog on their
own. Although not usually providing physical assistance,
the job of a home companion dog is extremely special.
These dogs bring comfort, encouragement, and joy to their
human partners. Home companion dogs are considered
for individuals of all ages.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Seniors

Where we work

Accreditations

Assistance Dogs International Inc. 2010

Affiliations & memberships

Assistance Dogs International (ADI) 2012

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of applicants applying for service and companion dogs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Service Dogs

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These numbers are based on applicants who both applied and were granted interviews.

Number of people returning for successor service and companion dogs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Service Dogs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

A successor dog is a recipient's second, third, etc. dog. We consider recipients applying for successors as a significant endorsement of our services and their satisfaction.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

While volunteers have always been important to CPL's success, it is only recently that volunteer management has been formalized and we began tracking number of active volunteers.

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of Canine Partners for Life (CPL) is to increase the independence and quality of life of individuals with physical, developmental, and cognitive disabilities or who are in other situations of need. We achieve our mission by providing and sustaining professionally trained service dogs and companion dogs. CPL's primary efforts will be focused on an area within a 250-mile radius of Cochranville, Pennsylvania, but we look forward to continuing to place dogs with recipients from across the nation who come to us because our dogs and services are held in such high regard.

In pursuit of its mission, Canine Partners for Life is dedicated to the following general principles:
- We train our dogs to meet the specific needs of individuals and the environments in which they are living.
- We seek to establish a lifetime bond between dog and graduate.
- We commit ourselves to a comprehensive program of follow-up training and support services to ensure each team's success in achieving their goals.

In addition to the traditional service dog, CPL trains and places the following:

Medical alert dogs can warn of impending seizure or cardiac activity up to an hour in advance -- allowing their partners to move to a safe environment. These dogs, with an amazing natural ability, are able to detect a seizure and/or cardiac episode before they happen.

Home companion dogs usually do not provide physical assistance, but serve as well-trained companions in the home environment for people with neurological or cognitive impairments as well as other health issues. These partners provide immeasurable comfort in a wide variety of situations.

Residential companion dogs are trained and placed in group and retirement homes or other similar communities to provide daily pet therapy.

Courthouse companion dogs provide comfort and emotional support to children and adults who are victims of crime from the interview stage all the way to trial.

Canine Partners for Life (CPL) takes each service dog through a two-year, comprehensive and customized training program. Puppies spend their first year of life being raised by volunteers in the community and in CPL's Prison Puppy Raising Program. At approximately 14 months of age the dogs move into the CPL Kennel to work with CPL's professional trainers until they are two years old. During this second year of training, the staff works to perfect and expand the obedience skills that the puppy homes have begun, increase the intensity of environments in which they are expected to work and learn the particular skills needed to assist a person who has a disability.

At the end of this two year period, the dog and its partner are paired and begin their wonderful work together as a team. This ‘Team Training’ lasts for 2 1/2 weeks, but the work doesn’t stop there. CPL has one of the strongest follow-up programs in the industry that ensures the success of each team throughout the life of their partnership. In addition, the CPL Board of Directors recently identified and endorsed the following Strategic Goals:

1. Goal: We will continue to provide and train in accordance with national industry standards high quality service and companion dogs to best meet the individual needs of each recipient.

2. Goal: CPL will have the human, financial and physical resources it needs to continue its role as a national leader among service dog organizations.

3. Goal: Increase marketing efforts, community awareness, stakeholder engagement and educational opportunities relating to our programs and the service dog industry.

4. Goal: CPL’s Board of Directors and staff will collaborate to ensure the success and effectiveness of its programs and operations through strong, caring and engaged leadership.

For over 30 years, Canine Partners For Life (CPL) has been dedicated to training service dogs, home companion dogs, residential companion dogs and courthouse companion dogs to assist individuals who have a wide range of physical and cognitive disabilities.

CPL was founded in 1989. The organization flourished, and in 1997, we purchased a 45-acre property in Cochranville, PA and expanded further. Today, our facilities include the Marian S. Ware Program Services Center, a training facility and state of the art kennel. Our Program Team encompasses a vast knowledge of the working dog industry as well as the most current and effective positive training techniques.

To date, CPL has placed more than 750 service and companion dogs nationwide. CPL is a leader in the assistance dog industry and is a voting member of Assistance Dogs International (ADI). We were one of the first service dog organizations in the world to be accredited by ADI and we continue to be at the forefront of the industry.

In 2014, CPL entered into the first phase of an $8.5 million capital campaign to address critical safety, service, and space issues on our campus. We are thrilled to announce that the initial phase of this two-phase project is complete! With generous community support we were able to construct The Marian S. Ware Program Services Center (PSC). This will soon be followed by the second phase to build our new Training Center, The Mollie and Minor Barringer Training Center featuring the Copeland Training Room. The Training Center must be upgraded from a pole barn to a safe, efficient, and professional structure that respects the unique needs of the people we serve.

With a rapidly growing waiting list and more graduate support services required by our ever-expanding number of graduates nationwide, our training facilities are hindering the safety and quality of services we can provide to a population of people who have very specific and detailed needs. As our graduates return to the organization for successor dogs, they are always moved to the top of our waiting list, causing new applicants to be faced with waits of up to five years to receive a dog. Our training facility cannot support further growth to meet the needs of our clients until we address critical facility improvements and expansion. We need to have a training facility that allows us to operate safely, efficiently, and effectively. Once accomplished, this campaign will allow us to complete the full cycle, from birth of our puppies to their graduation, on our beautiful campus!

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Canine Partners for Life
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Canine Partners for Life

Board of directors
as of 12/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Walter Griffitts

Michael Dzuba

Alex Joyce

Mary Bryant

Janet Cooper

Tory Kitchell

Jennifer Madden

Erin O'Brien

Jessalyn Cool

Glenn Stryjewski

David Baker

Michael Flynn

Joseph Fratinardo

Jeffrey Gorris

Walter Griffitts

Allison Morrisey

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/30/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data