HOPE INTERNATIONAL

Lancaster, PA   |  www.hopeinternational.org

Mission

HOPE's mission is to invest in the dreams of families in the world's underserved communities as we proclaim and live the Gospel.

Ruling year info

1997

President & CEO

Mr. Peter Greer

Chief Operating Officer

Mr. Jesse Casler

Main address

227 Granite Run Drive Suite 250

Lancaster, PA 17601 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-2836648

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

HOPE International seeks to address the great spiritual and material needs in our world by sharing the Gospel and providing financial services in underserved communities. Despite recent increases in financial access, 1.7 billion adults are still unbanked (Global Findex report, 2017), meaning they do not have access to financial services—necessary capital to grow their businesses or a safe place to save money. Without these services, families lack financial security and stability, leaving them more vulnerable to the challenges of poverty and more likely to see their children grow up in poverty.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Christ-centered financial services

HOPE believes families in poverty have the God-given talents and skills to provide for their families. What they don't have is a lump sum of money to invest in their potential - by paying school fees, saving for the future, or investing in businesses. In obedience to Christ's command to love our neighbor and make disciples of all nations, HOPE International provides discipleship opportunities, training, a safe place to save, and small loans. We offer these services through two models: Savings groups and microfinance institutions. Savings groups (SGs) are groups of individuals who save their money together in partnership with the local Church. As they build a secure sum of money, members often take out loans from their group to pay for household expenses or invest in businesses. Microfinance institutions (MFIs) are banks designed to serve entrepreneurs in poverty by providing small loans, a safe place to save, and other financial services to help men and women invest in their businesses and provide for their families.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 4-star rating (14 straight years) 2021

Affiliations & memberships

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability Accredited 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As of 2020, we modified our reporting methods. After three years, we commission local churches which means they 'graduate' from the savings group program, and they are no longer actively tracked.

Total dollar amount of client savings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As of 2020, we modified our reporting methods. After three years, we commission local churches which means they 'graduate' from the savings group program, and their savings are no longer included.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Motivated by the love of Christ, we invest in the dreams of families in underserved communities in 16 countries around the world as we proclaim and live the Gospel. We share the hope of Christ as we provide discipleship, biblically based training, savings services, and loans that restore dignity and break the cycle of poverty.

We seek to help foster change across four domains of impact – spiritual, material, personal, and social – through Christ-centered economic development. Our desire is that our clients and other stakeholders would grow in their relationship with Christ, experience material sufficiency and stewardship, have a greater understanding of their personal dignity and gifts, and enjoy community in place of isolation.

The challenges of poverty are complex and affect each family differently, so HOPE provides Christ-centered services that holistically impact and equip men and women to provide for their families and find their soul’s satisfaction in Jesus Christ. Through three models (microfinance institutions, savings programs, and small-and-medium-enterprise lending), we empower clients and their families using the following services:

Discipleship: We share the Gospel during regular interactions with clients and invite them to experience lasting transformation through a relationship with Christ.

Training: We provide biblically based training, mentoring, and coaching to help clients start or expand their businesses.

Savings services: We partner primarily with churches to equip them to provide savings services to their congregations, enabling families to save money to stabilize household income, provide a financial safety net, expand businesses, or pay routine expenses.

Loans: We provide loans to enable clients to access much-needed capital through purchasing productive assets, buying supplies in bulk, or investing in inventory or renovations.

HOPE International leverages staff expertise in finance, technology, economics, accounting, training, management, marketing, and development to achieve our goals. We are grateful to employ almost 900 global staff including 120 HOPE International employees and 777 employees of HOPE-managed programs around the world. We also work with over 4,000 volunteers. We are privileged to partner with over 4,200 donors, without whom our work would not be possible.

As a Christ-centered microenterprise network, HOPE operates 11 programs and partners with nine like-minded organizations to reach the underserved and share the Gospel in 16 countries around the world. The HOPE International network shares resources, best practices, and learnings to multiply our impact. We participate in multiple peer networks, including SEEP and ACCORD, and are an active member of the Christian Economic Development Network.

HOPE serves clients, many of which live in especially challenging environments. Alongside local partners, we have launched eleven new savings group programs and seen clients and group members give their lives to Christ and serve their communities in transformative ways. We have seen generational impact as clients send their children to school and equip them to step into the future with confidence. We have invested in flourishing staff through our holistic staff development plan. We have collaborated with partners to create new trainings that will multiply impact and create value for clients. We have walked alongside donors as they use what’s in their hands to partner with us in participating in God’s Kingdom.

HOPE has consistently received Charity Navigator’s highest rating of four stars for the last 14 years. We are accredited by the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) and recognized by Intelligent Philanthropy for our commitment to transparency.

As the global landscape of financial services changes with the advent of new technologies and new geopolitical circumstances, we remain focused on serving underserved communities and providing distinctly Christ-centered financial services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The savings group ministry is designed and implemented as a ministry of the local church. Through a survey focused on better understanding the experience of church volunteers, we learned about a key need to increase engagement from local church pastors. In response, we are gathering information from church pastors more systematically to better understand their experience, are reinforcing training for pastors, and innovating with new ways to engage them.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

HOPE INTERNATIONAL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HOPE INTERNATIONAL

Board of directors
as of 12/6/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jeff Rutt

Keystone Custom Homes, HOPE International

Jeff Rutt

Founder/CEO, Keystone Custom Homes; Founder, HOPE International

Brian Lewis

Principal, Cereus Partners Inc.

Katelyn Beaty

Editor at Large, Christianity Today

Douglas Bolles

Chief Investment Officer, Southside Wealth Management

Peter Greer

President & CEO, HOPE International

Cathi Linch

CPA; Senior Vice President of Loan Administration, MidFirst Bank

Andre Mann

Head of European Operations, Diversified Conveyors Inc.

Durwood Snead

Director, globalX

Chilobe Kalambo

President and Managing Member of Kalambo Consulting

Katy Rogers

Human Resources Director, mpowered

Chris Crane

Chairman and Co-Founder, Edify

Dabbs Cavin

Former CFO, Mountaire Corporation

Lance Wood

Tax Partner and Leader, PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data