PHILADELPHIA YOUTH NETWORK INC

Building Solutions to Educate and Employ

aka PYN   |   Philadelphia, PA   |  www.pyninc.org

Mission

PYN's mission is to create coordinated systems which promote the attainment of academic achievement, economic opportunity and personal success. Our vision is to alleviate poverty and inequity through education and employment. PYN brings together key players across sectors to alleviate a root cause of poverty by preparing 12-24-year-olds to become productive working adults. Alongside our partners, PYN dramatically changes the trajectory of individuals’ lives by giving voice to underserved youth, and ultimately creating a pipeline for an educated, engaged workforce. Since 1999, PYN has provided more than 200,000 high quality education and career readiness programs and launched a citywide initiative that has helped to increase Philadelphia's high school graduation rate from 52% to 69%.

Ruling year info

1999

President and CEO

Ms. Chekemma J. Fulmore-Townsend

Main address

400 Market Street Suite 200

Philadelphia, PA 19106 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-2993155

NTEE code info

Management & Technical Assistance (O02)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As it stands, a serious skills gap persists in Philadelphia: while 46% of employers report they are struggling to fill jobs (Manpower Group 2018), PYN estimates nearly 90,000 youth are seeking opportunities. These youth can and want to enter the jobs employers are struggling to fill, but they need access to career readiness and work experiences to gain the skills needed. On the other hand, employers need a trained/skilled workforce to fill these open jobs, but they are facing major challenges in accessing this type of talent pipeline. Closing the skills gap is particularly critical in today’s economy, where the fastest-growing occupations require increasing education and jobs requiring less education are declining, pay less, and offer fewer opportunities for advancement. Given persistent racial and ethnic gaps in educational attainment, these changes could lock many people of color out of opportunities a growing economy offers (Brown and Loprest 2018).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

System Builder: Creating Education and Emloyment Opportunities for Youth

With the vision of alleviating poverty and inequity through education and employment, PYN has a particular focus on better serving youth who face systemic barriers to accessing these programs. To this end, PYN’s core programs include summer and year-round programs and citywide initiatives that, combined, provided more than 17,000 education and emplyoment opportunities annually in FY18:

Summer Youth Employment Programs: WorkReady Philadelphia is a citywide effort to address the skills gap by convening partners to build a coordinated approach to preparing young people for future employment. A hallmark of WorkReady Philadelphia is the summer youth employment programs, which serve approximately 10,000 youth and young adults annually through four foundational program models (career exposure, service learning, work experience, internships) or, beginning in 2020, through a fifth option, Innovation Accelerator. PYN developed these program models based on positive youth development research and best practices. They are designed to meet the developmental needs of each young person in their educational/career journey, as outlined in PYN’s Career Development Framework (see attachment). Since its inception in 2003, WorkReady Philadelphia has provided over 225,000 opportunities for young people (both through PYN programs and partnerships with other organizations) and distributed over $95M in youth wages. WorkReady is managed by the Philadelphia Youth Network (PYN). For more information, visit www.workready.org.

Year-Round Youth Employment Programs: In addition to summer programs, PYN operates and supports, via technical assistance and professional development, a wide range of year-round programs across Philadelphia. For example, E3 Power Centers are neighborhood-based drop-in centers throughout Philadelphia designed to offer a holistic approach to preparing disconnected young people for success through Education, Employment and Empowerment. Upon completion of the E3 Power Centers program, graduates should begin their journey with sustained employment, earning a living wage and/or entering postsecondary education. E3 Power Centers serve over 600 youth annually including youth disconnected from school and employment, youth involved in the foster care system, and youth returning from juvenile justice placement. PYN is the managing partner of E3 Power Centers, while community-based organizations provide direct services to E3 members. In addition, PYN provides professional development, training, and technical assistance to publicly funded programs serving more than 50,000 young people to ensure they are providing opportunities that help build skills, mindsets, and career pathways aligned with the Career Development Framework.

Citywide Initiatives: PYN is leading the collaboration to (1) engage 16,000 youth annually in high-quality work experiences by 2020 and (2) connect 4,000 unemployed/out-of-school young adults aged 16-24 to career pathways as part of the citywide workforce development plan. Partners include the City of Philadelphia, PA Department of Human Services, School District of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Works, Community College of Philadelphia, Chamber of Commerce, United Way Greater, employers, and youth-serving organizations. In alignment with these goals, PYN is working with partners to implement a centralized referral network, which will improve coordination among employers, youth-serving organizations, and youth seeking opportunities. The anticipated outcome is to address the skills gap in Philadelphia by preparing young people for high-growth careers and building the talent pipeline employers desire. For a full list of PYN’s current partnerships, please visit www.pyninc.org.

Population(s) Served

PYN operates a multitude of pilot programs including Pipelines to Apprenticeships, Pathways for Justice Careers, Post-Secondary Bridging, Career-Bridging, and Youth Entrepreneurship. As an innovation incubator, PYN is able to discover best practices in youth development and strive for continuous learning and improvement. For a full list of PYN's current pilots, please see PYN's Annual Report, Building Solutions.

Population(s) Served

Finally, as a strategic consultant, PYN seeks to share our best practices and provide resources and tools that grow our capacity in other communities. PYN has worked with Detroit, MI and Seattle, WA to help build their youth workforce development systems and programs.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients placed in internships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

System Builder: Creating Education and Emloyment Opportunities for Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# of summer employment opportunities provided annually via distinct program models including internships, career exposure, service learning, and work experiences.

Number of employer partners offering jobs to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

System Builder: Creating Education and Emloyment Opportunities for Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In FY2018, PYN connected young people to 975 worksites across 11 industries, including high-growth industries such as health care, information systems, and retail/hospitality.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

System Builder: Creating Education and Emloyment Opportunities for Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# of longer-term, year-round opportunities provided. These opportunities connect young people to education and employment and include E3 Power Centers, internships, pilot programs, and more.

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

PYN tracks outcomes for youth in long-term programs including credentials attained (479 in 2017-2018) and post-secondary placements in education or employment (1,140 in 2017-2018).

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

PYN believes that one of the most important and effective approaches to poverty reduction is preparing young citizens to become productive employees, entrepreneurs, and leaders. This belief is based on research which shows that early work experience has the potential to produce a number of positive, work-related outcomes. Research has shown that youth-focused career-development programs are most effective when students have access to a continuum of work-based learning opportunities that align with their varying stages of development.

PYN’s employment programs serves thousands of youth ages 12-24 from neighborhoods across Philadelphia. Each year, nearly all participants self-identify as youth of color and as having household incomes at or below 235% of the poverty line. Participants reflect the overall demographics of the city: Philadelphia has the highest poverty rate (26% as of 2014) among the top 10 largest U.S. cities, including 37% of Philadelphia’s children living below the federal poverty line, and a relatively low median income ($39,043, compared to the U.S. median income of $53,657).

In the coming years, the Philadelphia Youth Network (PYN) aims to strengthen and expand the availability of high-quality jobs and work experiences for low-income youth and young adults. Working with partners including the Chamber of Commerce of Greater Philadelphia, Philadelphia Works Inc., the School District of Philadelphia and Urban Affairs Coalition, the Philadelphia Youth Network (PYN) is leading efforts to ensure the City of Philadelphia will meet its goals of providing 16,000 youth and young adults with high-quality employment opportunities by 2020. These goals, outlined in Fueling Philadelphia’s Talent Engine, are also aligned with PYN’s strategic plan, 2020 Vision, which also promotes substantial increases in jobs and work experiences for young Philadelphians.

In 2017, PYN's board and staff engaged in a comprehensive planning process that resulted in our current 3-year strategic plan, 2020 Vision. The full plan can be accessed here: http://www.pyninc.org/2020vision. To summarize, the strategic plan outlines actions towards achieving PYN’s vision and mission by playing three critical roles to fuel change within communities: (1) a system builder creating a unified system of services and resources; (2) an innovation incubator facilitating processes to develop, import, and replicate new approaches; and (3) a strategic consultant providing resources and tools that grow capacity in communities. Each of these roles ties in with a specific goal.

- Create 20,000 education and employment opportunities for young people annually. Progress to date: 17,020 opportunities provided in 2017-2018
- Improve and scale three pilot programs for young people with one or more barriers to education and employment. Progress to date: one pilot completed and scaled; eight pilots launched as of 2017-2018
- Share our best practices through replication in two states beyond Pennsylvania. Progress: Achieved – PYN provided strategic consulting to 2 states (Michigan and Washington) beyond Pennsylvania as of 2017-2018

In addition, as part of the citywide workforce development strategy, Fueling Philadelphia’s Talent Engine (released 2018), PYN is leading Philadelphia's citywide goals to (1) engage 16,000 youth annually in high-quality work experiences by 2020 and (2) connect 4,000 unemployed/out-of-school young adults aged 16-24 to career pathways. Partners include the City of Philadelphia, PA Department of Human Services, School District of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Works, Community College of Philadelphia, Chamber of Commerce, United Way Greater, employers, and youth-serving organizations. In alignment with these goals, PYN is working with partners to implement a centralized referral network, which will improve coordination among employers, youth-serving organizations, and youth seeking opportunities. The anticipated outcome is to address the skills gap in Philadelphia by preparing young people for high-growth careers and building the talent pipeline employers desire.

Finally, in 2018 PYN released a new Career Development Framework, which provides a continuum of experiences for youth to develop career readiness skills and connect to a career pathway. The CDF has been widely adopted by PYN's employer partners, network of service providers, and key city agencies. In 2018, the Department of Human Services incorporated the CDF into its procurement cycle and now requires that providers adhere to the CDF across their programs. In the coming year, PYN will provide technical assistance and professional development to support these efforts, and to build the capacity of out-of-school time providers to better help youth identify and enter a career pathway aligned with their skills and interests.

Founded in 1999, PYN was among the first organizations in the country to systematically increase connections between formal education and employment preparation. Since then, PYN has become a leader in innovating service delivery, leveraging funding, aligning partners and enhancing systems to support better outcomes in education and employment for youth in Philadelphia. Using a collective impact approach, PYN unites leaders and resources to create new solutions to complex, large-scale social problems. Since its founding, PYN has secured more than $500M dollars from public and private sources, managed over 200 plus contracts with community-based organizations to create a coordinated youth service system and provide over 192,000 high-quality opportunities for young people.

PYN’s strategic approach is unique in that we blend practice and policy to prepare young people for the future of work. On the practice side, PYN works with over 50 local organizations with the goal of creating 20,000 education and employment opportunities for young people by 2020. PYN provides a continuum of services that guide young people from early career connections to advancement along their chosen career path. On the policy side, PYN builds partnerships with local leaders and community members to develop joint solutions that ensure young people are prepared to excel in school and enter the workforce.
One recent example of combining policy and practice is the Post-Secondary Bridging (PSB) program PYN piloted to improve college going outcomes. In 2015, PYN created this pilot for youth working toward their GED to think about and prepare for college – which, at the time, few if any GED preparation programs were doing. PYN worked with E3 Power Centers, local drop-in centers serving out-of-school youth, and the Community College of Philadelphia to design and implement new services to support the unique needs of the population. Over two years, the program helped over 150 young people enroll in college preparation courses, far exceeding outcomes of similar programs. As a result, PYN secured new resources to sustain these services beyond the grant period and to work with community colleges, the school district, policymakers, and public agencies to expand these services citywide. PYN also created a toolkit of best practices so other communities can implement this program based on their needs and population. As importantly, the project led to a shift in culture within E3 Power Centers and across youth workforce development programs from a focus on attaining a high school diploma or equivalency to a focus on college knowledge and success.

PYN will continue to develop innovative programs and system-wide policies to build a sustainable and equitable career pathway system. This approach offers a long-term, cost-effective solution to the entrenched challenges of poverty and inequity, which ultimately benefits the entire community.

In FY18, PYN helped to create 17,020 opportunities for youth and young adults aged 12-24, 89% of whom were living in households below the poverty line. We launched 8 new pilot and scaled one pilot that had demonstrated promising results, and achieved our goal of sharing our best practices via consulting provided to Detroit, MI and Seattle, WA.

Of the 10,220 youth who participated in our short-term opportunities, 92% expressed an interest in further education; 97% developed a relationship with a caring adult, and 97% reported they were satisfied with their experience.

Of the 6,800 youth who participated in year-round, longer-term education and employment experiences, 479 attained credentials and 1,1140 achieved post-secondary placements.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

PHILADELPHIA YOUTH NETWORK INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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PHILADELPHIA YOUTH NETWORK INC

Board of directors
as of 11/22/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jeffrey Brown

Brown's Super Stores, Inc.

Term: 2008 - 2018

JoAnn Weinberger

Leadership Excellence Academies

Deborah Moses

VersVisalign

Debra Friedman

Cozen O'Conner

Gregory Doyle

Ernst & Young LLP

Jane Shore

Revolution School

Angela Moultrie

Santander Bank

John Clayton, Jr.

Independence Blue Cross

Douglas Oliver

PECO

Jannette Rivera

Mayor's Office of Labor Relations

Tracee Hunt

Total HR Solutions, LLC

Robert Weaver, III

Blank Rome, LLP

Tiffany Canady

Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation

Dave Burkavage

Ernst & Young

Nasir Mack

Student, Temple University, Fox School of Business

Nicole Connell

City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health & Intellectual DisAbility Services

Joshua Schmidt

InterDigital, Inc.

Tuck Rainwater

Comcast

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No