Boys and Girls Clubs of Dorchester Inc.

We Are Dorchester

aka Boys & Girls Clubs of Dorchester   |   Dorchester, MA   |  www.bgcdorchester.org

Mission

To inspire and enable all young people, from diverse circumstances, to realize their full potential by providing opportunities for personal growth to become contributing, caring and responsible members of the community

Ruling year info

1970

President & CEO

Mr. Robert Scannell Jr.

Main address

1135 Dorchester Avenue

Dorchester, MA 02125 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Colonel Daniel Marr Boys & Girls Club

EIN

23-7076465

NTEE code info

Youth Centers, Clubs, (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose (O20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every child should have an equal shot at life, but the hard truth is that children cannot choose the life circumstances into which they are born. Factors such as poverty, ethnicity, cultural and language barriers, geography and disability can hinder or even prevent lifelong success. BGCD is committed to leveling the playing field in Boston’s inner city. Through a thoughtfully constructed youth development framework, we help young people thrive today while building the skills they need to succeed throughout their lives. We invest in children’s hopes, dreams and futures. They choose their path, and we help pave the way.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Academic Success

Academic Success
• Education: Homework help, tutoring, STEAM activities, literacy programs, and college prep
• Art: Drawing, painting, sculpture, design and more
• Music: Lessons (drum, guitar, bass, ukulele, piano, voice, saxophone), specialized classes (music production, beat-making and songwriting), workshops and performance opportunities
• Film & Photography: Hands-on small group projects that immerse youth in the basics of photography, filming, directing, audio production, editing, and producing
• Career Prep: Job placements, on-the-job training and career education activities
• Teen Program: Age-appropriate activities that support and encourage young people as they transition to adulthood, with a focus on goal-setting, career and college prep

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Boys & Girls Clubs of Dorchester's Early Education & Care and School Age programs provide an environment where children and families receive high quality services for infants, toddlers & preschoolers and licensed after-school care for children ages 5- 12 years. The program is NAEYC accredited. The Club is proud to serve as the Boston Public Schools' only K-1 pilot within a community based program.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Healthy Lifestyles
• Athletics: Intramural team sports and individual fitness activities, including basketball, floor hockey, flag football, gymnastics, yoga and fencing
• Aquatics: Swim team, lessons, and inclusive/family swims
• Social recreation: On- and off-site activities that give kids fun, safe ways to spend their free time
• Healthy Meals: Nutritious meals for youth on weekdays and family style meals on holidays
• Health & Life Skills: Programs that promote regular physical activity, good nutrition and stress management

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Character & Citizenship
• Character & Leadership Development: Keystone & Torch Clubs empower youth to give back to others, develop leadership skills and become responsible citizens
• Tween Program: Activities that build life skills, social skills, self-confidence, self-reliance and personal safety strategies

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

BGCD is widely recognized as a leader in inclusion in out-of-school time settings. Our commitment to helping every child realize his or her full potential is evident through our award-winning inclusion initiative, Project BIND, which has dramatically increased out-of-school time opportunities for youth with disabilities in and around Dorchester. With thoughtful supports and adaptations, we include youth of all abilities in all our programs. Project BIND also forges a strong support network for families.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Boys and Girls Clubs of America 1983

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our ultimate goal for intended impact is to provide a safe haven and life-enhancing programs to the youth of Dorchester, Massachusetts. This goal embodies our mission to inspire and enable all young people, from diverse circumstances, to realize their full potential by providing opportunities for personal growth to become contributing, caring and responsible members of the community. Our target population is youth ages 5-18 living in and around Dorchester, MA. Fostering children's continual, positive progression from infancy to young adulthood, so that they may achieve the greatest possible success in life, is the larger purpose behind everything we do. Our long-term vision is to be the premier provider of hope and opportunity to the youth of our community by providing high-quality services through well-planned, sustainable growth. We are dedicated to ensuring that youth have access to quality programs that will enhance their lives and shape their futures. We continually seek ways to bring our services to a higher level to the benefit of our community and to meet the diverse needs of children of all backgrounds and abilities.

We incorporate the research-based “Five Key Elements for Positive Youth Development” set forth by Boys & Girls Clubs of America:

1. Safe, positive environment
2. Fun and sense of belonging
3. Supportive relationships
4. Meaningful opportunities and expectations
5. Formal and informal recognition

Caring Program Directors serve as “champions” who encourage youth to pursue academic success, make healthy choices, be community leaders and set goals. Through their participation, youth mitigate risk factors and gain competencies to build resilience:

• Intrapersonal skills: Youth manage their emotions, take ownership over their learning and express themselves appropriately
• Interpersonal skills: Youth develop healthy, supportive relationships with peers and adults of all backgrounds/abilities, learn to negotiate conflict and demonstrate empathy
• Self-realization skills: Youth set and achieve goals, connect goals to actions and commit to a personal plan leading to life success
• Healthy lifestyles: Youth understand and commit to positive behaviors that support their mental, emotional and physical well-being
• Sense of community: Youth develop solid connections to their community, making them more likely to avoid negative behaviors
• Decision-making: Youth develop problem-solving and decision-making skills, accept responsibility and assess situations and potential outcomes

Our programs' design was informed by many years of experience in serving the youth of Dorchester. BGCD has led the charge among youth development organizations in Boston for four decades. Our reputation for exceptional programming, informed leadership and dedication to the community we serve has positioned the Club as one of the region's foremost authorities on youth development and best practices in serving at-risk youth. This history of excellence was one of the lead factors in BGCA's decision to entrust our Club with the rehabilitation of the Boys & Girls Club of Brockton, enabling Brockton to continue to serve their community - a community in desperate need of a successful Boys & Girls Club. Developing effective responses to unmet needs in our community has inspired our program design since our inception. We have received program excellence awards from BGCA for Safe Summer Streets, our groundbreaking nighttime summer program for teens. We were also chosen as a 2014 Merit Award winner for Project B.I.N.D. (Boston Inclusion Network for Disabilities), an initiative designed to encourage the educational and social enrichment and advancement of children with special needs throughout Dorchester and the surrounding neighborhoods. In 2015 we were chosen as a Merit Award winner for our inclusive Challenger Soccer program, run as a part of Project B.I.N.D., and in 2016, we won the same award for our Music Clubhouse. In 2020, our Who Am I Project, a leadership and communication program for teens, was awarded an Honor Award by BGCA, the top program honor it bestows.

Setting and accomplishing reasonable but worthwhile near-term objectives has always been an important part of the way we pursue our long-term vision to be the premier provider of hope and opportunity to the youth of our community by providing high-quality services through well-planned, sustainable growth. For example, several years ago we determined that we could better serve our youth by rolling out a program for younger children than we served at the time. Through an internal and external evaluation process we identified a critical age group that was being underserved in the community and at the Club: children ages 3-5. Our Club previously consisted of two wings, our early education and care program and our out-of-school time programs for youth ages 6-18. The unintentional gap between those two areas meant that children graduating from our early education program could not feed directly into our membership program for school-age youth. In response, we rolled out a strategic initiative to create a natural bridge between these programs to provide a continuity of services and support for youth as young as two months through 18 years of age. Executing this strategic initiative involved two steps. First, we lowered the minimum membership age from six to five so that five-year-olds could benefit from our existing, high quality after-school and summer programs that support children's social, emotional, intellectual and creative development. Secondly, we developed dedicated programming for three, four and five-year-olds. These ""Learn To"" programs bridge the early childhood and membership areas of the Club and give young children an introduction to the activities they can explore further when they are old enough to become Club members. For example, Learn to Swim might later inspire them to join the swim team; Learn to Tumble could spark an interest in yoga, gymnastics or dance. Through this evaluative process, we have built a web of support to help youth reach developmental and educational milestones at every life stage from infancy to young adulthood, ultimately leading them to success in adulthood. As children grow and progress from grade to grade, they find at our Boys & Girls Club year-round activities designed to help them thrive at every developmental stage. In this way, we now promote a comprehensive, continual progression toward developmental, educational and career-related outcomes that will enable youth to reach their full potential.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    To inspire and enable all young people, from diverse circumstances, to realize their full potential by providing opportunities for personal growth to become contributing, caring and responsible members of the community.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Creating Learning Hubs to assist children in person with remote learning. Distributions of Food, Clothing and PPE for families in need.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Families are our best resource. One of our goals is to help strengthen families; in turn this enhances the quality of our programs Engaging them in the work helps us to allocate funding in a more meaningful way. Through open, honest communication and by allowing families to share their knowledge, ideas and needs we are better able to meet the needs of the community, keep our finger on the pulse and supports us in preparing children for lifelong success. When families are listened to and their ideas are respected, they feel more vested in what happens and more competent in their role as parents. Through these interactions and relationships, families may learn additional strategies from each other as well as from staff.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Boys and Girls Clubs of Dorchester Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Boys and Girls Clubs of Dorchester Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Lee Michael Kennedy

No Affiliation

Term: 2010 -

Robert Scannell Jr.

No Affiliation

David Hughes

No Affiliation

Daniel Marr III

No Affiliation

Larry Bird

No Affiliation

Joseph Brodigan, Sr.

No Affiliation

Kevin Chapman

No Affiliation

Joseph D’Arrigo

No Affiliation

Linda Dorcena-Forry

No Affiliation

Paul Gannon

No Affiliation

Marcy Jackson

No Affiliation

Elizabeth Keeley

No Affiliation

Jonathan Keith

No Affiliation

Lee Kennedy, Sr.

No Affiliation

Lee Michael Kennedy

No Affiliation

Stephen Lynch

No Affiliation

David Marr, Sr.

No Affiliation

Jeffrey Marr

No Affiliation

Stephen Marr

No Affiliation

Sean McDonough

No Affiliation

Gerald Morrissey, Jr.

No Affiliation

Marie St. Fleur

No Affiliation

Mark Wahlberg

No Affiliation

Timothy Burnieika

Community Volunteer

John DiNicola, II

Community Volunteer

Andrew Graff

Community Volunteer

Maureen Peterson

Community Volunteer

Lynda Thomas

ThermoFisher

Robert Sheridan

Retired

Aimee Southworth

Community Volunteer

Jack Corbett

The Kelliher Corbett Group at Morgan Stanley

Tony Dang

MBTA Transit Police

Jane Panariello

Community Volunteer

Katherine Craven

None

Karen Diep

None

Kerr Mone

None

Michael O'Brien

None

Carmelo Travieso

None

Robert Hatch

None

Jennifer Corcoran

None

Therese Fitzgerald

None

Annie Tomasini

None

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/01/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.