Health—General & Rehabilitative

Esperanca, Inc.

Phoenix, AZ   |  www.esperanca.org

Mission

Esperanca's mission is to improve health and provide hope for families in the poorest communities of the world through sustainable disease prevention, education and treatment.

Notes from the nonprofit

Esperanca's fiscal year 2017 audited financial statements shows $0.92 cents of every dollar contributed was spent directly on programs.

Ruling year info

1970

CEO

Mrs. Jeri Royce

Main address

1911 W Earll Dr

Phoenix, AZ 85015 USA

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EIN

23-7087997

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Health Support Services (E60)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Disease Prevention, Education & Training

Esperança works to prevent and treat malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, cholera, Chagas disease and other illnesses that plague families living in developing countries. Since 2002, Esperança has put additional effort into combating Chagas disease, which leads to organ damage when left untreated. It is spread through insects that thrive in Latin America and Caribbean homes with thatched roofs and mud walls. Chagas infection rates in some regions are as high as 80%. Effective, low-cost solutions are available, and we emphasize preventative education, diagnosis and treatment.

Countless villagers around the globe have suffered devastating effects from easily preventable diseases, because they had no way to receive basic health messages or access health care. A longstanding way to reach residents of the developing world is called the promotora model. It involves identifying community leaders and training them in strategies for disease prevention. They then train other members of their community establishing practices that improve the health of the entire neighborhood. At each project site, Esperança identifies leaders who are willing to volunteer as health promoters. To date, thousands have been trained and are making their communities healthier.

Esperança recognizes that there are communities in the United States that struggle daily with unmet health needs. In 2000 we began providing health education, including oral health, nutrition and fitness information for the entire family, basic medical screenings, health referrals and capacity-building initiatives in communities in Phoenix, Arizona. We take pride in being part of the effort here in the U.S. to make our own communities healthier.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
People with diseases and illnesses

Of all the work Esperança conducts, none has more dramatic effect than the surgeries performed through our medical missions. The majority of our medical volunteers are general surgeons who conduct operations that significantly improve quality of life for our patients, and in some cases are life-saving. Volunteer surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses come from all over the U.S.,procuring medical supplies for their mission and paying for their own airfare. Each team travels for approximately 10 days and accomplishes between 40 and 50 surgeries. When our local personnel are not preparing for a surgical mission or administering one, they are processing donated medical goods and equipment sent to them from Esperança. A shipment of donated medical goods is typically worth an estimated value of $2 million.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
People with diseases and illnesses

In the developing world, unsafe water conditions and a lack of basic sanitation can cause up to 80% of diseases. Most water sources are contaminated as they are used not only for drinking and cooking but for bathing, laundry, irrigation and waste disposal as well. Waterborne illnesses, such as cholera, have devastating consequences for poor families, with children being the most vulnerable. Delivering clean water and improved sanitation is a major focus of Esperança’s work. We build community wells, water systems and latrines in every region we serve using local materials. Each benefiting family participates in the construction process, providing all of the labor and taking true ownership of their new water sources.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
General/Unspecified

Adequate nutrition is critical to maintaining health. Malnutrition increases both the risk of contracting disease and the severity of any illness. Esperança is investing in food-related micro business opportunities for poor families. We provide livestock like pigs and chickens or seed crops like quinoa and the relevant training to ensure success. Families gain a stable source of food, immediately improving their nutrition. Profits from selling excess milk, eggs, grain and other crops can be used to further improve the family’s health such as replacing mud walls, continuing their child’s education, or gaining access to clean water.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
General/Unspecified

Millions in the developing world live in homes constructed of nothing more than cardboard, mud, sticks, and various discarded materials. Mud walls and thatched roofs also provide homes for disease-bearing insects. Cooking is often done over an open fire, resulting in harmful respiratory infections for the family and causes accidents and severe burns – especially for children. Since 1970, Esperanca has constructed thousands of new homes around the world. A typical home costs just a few thousand dollars and consists of two bedrooms, a living area, kitchen, bathroom and storage. We select families who have the greatest need. We provide the materials, training and oversight to complete each home.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Where we work

Awards

Four Star Charity 2018

Charity Navigator

Seal of Excellence 2012

Independent Charities of America

GuideStar Exchange Valued Partner-Partners in Trust 2018

GuideStar.org

Platinum Rating 2018

GuideStar.org

The Outstanding Non-Profit Diversity Award 2017

Blackboard

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Disease Prevention, Education & Training

Context Notes

Multi-faceted disease prevention programs and health education programs in the Phoenix area targeting under-served communities.

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Volunteer Surgical Program

Context Notes

Esperanca Surgical Program currently operates in Nicaragua and Peru.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Since our founding in 1970, Esperança has strived to impact the lives of the underserved. Focusing on the areas of food security, clean water, housing improvement, health education, and disease prevention, Esperança aims to empower communities by creating sustainable, quality of life improvements. We have found it most effective to provide people with tools to have a positive impact on their lives, because we believe our work is most effective partnering with communities in a collaborative effort to have a positive impact on health. We provide communities with resources and information that will allow them to change their own lives. In turn, our partner communities choose their own priorities thereby ensuring self-determination. Esperança currently partners with non-governmental organizations in Bolivia, Mexico, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Peru, and Phoenix, AZ. Internationally, surgeons travel to volunteer their time in medical missions to train local staff; communities take charge of construction tasks when we partner to build homes and water systems; agricultural projects utilize local farmers; in Phoenix and internationally, members of the community conduct health prevention education. This model translates into communities being transformed by promoting and teaching lasting change.

Esperança seeks to improve health outcomes by implementing a variety of initiatives across our six sites, currently consisting of, Bolivia, Mexico, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Peru, and Phoenix. We create partnerships with locally run non-governmental organizations that are based in the countries and communities with work with. In doing this, we are able to create sustainable change empowering those in the community. Our partners are responsible for deciding their priorities annually which determine the direction of heath and development projects. In addition, Esperança incorporates its partners’ strategic plans into our own. Since our inception, our surgical teams have conducted more than 11,000 surgeries in Brazil, Bolivia, and Nicaragua. Our volunteer doctors are able to create sustainable change by training local medical staff providing them with the tools to continue care for patients seen, in addition to imparting knowledge to local doctors and staff that allow them to conduct future surgeries on their own. In Peru, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Mozambique, our local partners are building or improving water systems to improve access to clean water and sanitation in a variety of ways, such as installing wells for drinking water and building latrines. Our annual shipment to our partners in Nicaragua provides them with 1.8 million dollars’ worth of donated medical supplies. The international food security and nutrition programs provide community members with the necessary training to plant and cultivate crops to improve peoples’ diets and provide additional income for families in Bolivia, Nicaragua, Mozambique and Peru. Disease prevention and treatment is a critical tool to improving health both in our international sites, and in cooperation with our local partners in Phoenix, AZ. Obesity and oral health are national issues that are affecting underserved communities at alarming rates. Community educators are key to implementing our evidence-based curricula for families in the underserved communities of Phoenix. Community educators are used in our international sites as a way to provide individuals with the tools to avoid preventable illnesses such as Chagas, malaria, cholera, HIV/AIDS, respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases and maternal and infant health internationally and oral health and obesity prevention in the USA.

Esperança is uniquely positioned to work with a number of countries and communities. Since 1970, we have operated in fourteen countries, giving us the expertise necessary to carry out our current work and prepare for future projects. Our model identifies locally run community partners who have a clear understanding of their community’s needs, and with our assistance, they are able to effectively implement projects for the most vulnerable communities. In addition, our model of partnering with a variety of community organizations allows us to think both strategically and innovatively about the delivery of services and the development of new projects. We continually seek out new partnerships to strengthen our services and explore the development of new projects that will transform lives. International and domestic staff bring a wide background of expertise, including the delivery of culturally appropriate education, a critical tool in effectively communicating with the communities we serve. For our international and domestic programs we have formed partnerships with a number of organizations including the Parson’s Murphy Pediatric Dental Clinic, Mission of Mercy, Arizona State University, Mayo Clinic, Maricopa Community Colleges, Project Cure, Desert Mission, Stryker Sustainability Solutions, Hospital Victoria Motta, Westech Recyclers, City of Phoenix, local health departments, and a number of elementary school districts. These partnerships allow us to form collaborations insuring optimal delivery of services. Esperança has been in operation for more than 44 years proving that we utilize a sustainable model for the delivery of services. Our annual operating budget comes from diverse sources including grants, private donations, and gains on our endowment.

Evaluation is a key way we measure the effectiveness of our programs. Domestically, we implement evidence based curricula for children and adults in attempt to reverse the obesity trend in the underserved communities of Phoenix, AZ. In addition, outcomes from our oral health education for adults have shown increased knowledge gains after the delivery of our culturally appropriate curriculum. International projects are conducted with the advisement of experts in the field including collaboration with university partners. Our project in Bolivia has seen a significant drop in Triatominae infestation rates, the vector of Chagas disease, in a number of municipalities. Infestation rates went from 18%--38% to 1%--2.8% in the communities that were targeted. These results led to our partners in Bolivia assisting in the development of guidelines and procedures for the prevention of Chagas Disease that were put in place by the government. Additionally, we have nearly doubled the number of farmers planting quinoa in a rural area of Bolivia to 70 farmers who are producing quinoa. It has resulted in the improved nutrition of community members by providing a protein deprived community with access to a complete protein. In Nicaragua, we have implemented water projects that have impacted 588 people in a rural community providing them with clean water. In the past year the food microbusiness program has conducted 34 workshops educating 529 farmers on proper techniques of maintaining chickens and monetizing eggs and meat for a sustainable income. Climate change has had a significant impact on community members in the rural communities that live in the high Andean Mountains near Cusco, Peru. Our ecological housing program has directly impacted 49 families which will result in a drop in respiratory diseases; currently the region has rates as high as 80.3% from poor insulation and traditional indoor cooking methods. Most importantly we involve the community as a way to gauge their need and continually evaluate the effectiveness of our programs. Due to our successes and the effectiveness of programing, we currently have a four star rating on Charity Navigator. Furthermore, we spend 90 cents of every dollar donated directly towards programming, ensuring that we are maximizing every dollar coming into the organization.

Esperança is planning to expand its programming to further impact communities in need. Domestically, we are exploring the development of multi-layered classes for adults building on our current curriculum that will focus on preparing culturally appropriate meals to include physical activity and community gardening, in order to better address issues of nutrition and obesity. Our domestic program is also looking to offer its services to additional communities, including expansion in communities currently served, to better address the obesity epidemic in young, underserved children. Oral health education is an integral part of the overall health of the communities we serve. We are exploring the expansion of our education to extended areas of Phoenix. Internationally, we hope to develop deeper partnerships with our current partners where we have made significant strides in tackling health issues, to further the reach to other communities not currently being served.

Financials

Esperanca, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Esperanca, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/23/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Martin Johnson

Mayo Clinic Scottsdale

Term: 2017 - 2019


Board co-chair

Mrs. Mistie Hague-Weishaar

Greenberg Traurig, LLP

Term: 2017 - 2019

Mistie Hague

Greenberg Traurig, LLP

Mary Jacobs

Managing Director, Kennedy Wilson

Martin Johnson

Plastic Surgeon, Mayo Clinic

Mark Jones

Technical Program Manager, Verizon

Jeremy Smith

Partner, Henry & Horne

Kenady Sorenson

Development Excutive, The Sedona Conference

Leila Barraza

University of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health

Charlie Clark

Pediatric Dental Specialists

Robert Clarke

Snell & Wilmer L.L.P.

James Foltz

Focus on Women

Jared Leslie

Foundation for Blind Children

Justin Niedzialek

The Cavanagh Law Firm, P.A.

Jason Paltzer

Kingdom Workers

Anthony Smith

Mayo Clinic

David Upjohn

Mayo Clinic

Rosemary Aird

University of Arizona Cancer Clinic at Dignity Health Medical Center

Stephanie Elliot

Arizona Office of the Attorney General

Carrie Leary

Schuster Print/ Marketing Management

McKenna Stephens

North Star Resource Group

Milton Mattox

Director, Client Delivery Program, Managed Services CGI

Zack Lindsay

Faculty Associate Arizona State University

Mark Williams

Law Office of Mark Williams, PLLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

esperanca, esperanza, children, volunteer, health, U.S., international health, medical, Tupper, Nicaragua, Mozambique, Bolivia, Peru, Volunteer Surgical Missions, Volunteer medical missions, clean water, sanitation, sustainable, low income housing, food sustainability, health education, oral health, disease prevention, obesity prevention