Sun Valley Museum of Art

Art is the highest form of hope.

aka SVMoA   |   Sun Valley, ID   |  www.svmoa.org

Mission

The mission of the Sun Valley Museum of Art is to enrich our community through transformative arts and educational experiences.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for considering Sun Valley Museum of Art

Ruling year info

1971

Artistic Director

Ms. Kristin Poole

Main address

PO Box 656

Sun Valley, ID 83353 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7113276

NTEE code info

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Visual Arts Organizations (A40)

Performing Arts Centers (A61)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Students and residents living in rural areas have less access—and sometimes little to no access—to arts experiences and arts education. As the largest arts organization in our area, a goal of SVMoA is to provide our community with educational and transformative arts experiences.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Arts Program

Our core programmatic areas include: Visual Arts: In our gallery space, we offer museum quality exhibitions that range widely in scope, structure, and subject, including works by nationally and internationally recognized contemporary artists, with occasional commissioned works within the community.

SVMoA offers free after-school art classes to bilingual and English speaking students, and and extensive lineup of classes for adults, forums on various topics featuring well-known artists, historians, environmentalists, authors and journalists.

The Sun Valley Museum of Art brings a wide variety of musical and dance performers to our community on a year round basis for public performances and residency work with local K-12 students.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

The Classroom Enrichment program is SVMoA's educational outreach program. Professional museum educators are paired with secondary, core, non-arts based classroom teachers to develop a project and co-teach an element of planned curriculum through a hands-on art project which takes place in the classroom. Arts integration reinforces and supports the learning students are doing through more traditional methods. Classroom Enrichment projects provide learning opportunities through the arts across the disciplines and also provide teachers with a new model for teaching core material. Teachers are encouraged by the learning that takes place in their classroom and, after participating, have the skills to implement arts integration elements into their curriculum. In addition to providing new methods of learning for students, this program develops collaborative relationships between SVMoA staff and public school teachers. The target audience for this program is students in grades 6–12 and core subject teachers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Artists in all mediums including musicians, dancers, authors and visual artists visit Blaine County Schools (both private and public) to offer performances, presentations, workshops and classes. Residencies are designed to expose students to the workings of professional artists and their commitment to their craft, to learn/ hear from/ experience global cultures and artistic styles, and to learn how to be an informed and respectful audience member. Pre-visit study guide materials, which include biographies of the artists and suggested classroom activities are distributed to teachers to prepare students for the performance or workshop. These workshops or master classes are designed to engage high school students who are enrolled in a class linked to the artist’s area of expertise and to enhance the classroom experience of both teachers and students. Artists work side by side with students and teachers discussing technique and approach. Occasionally, these residencies include working ahead of time to select pieces from the group’s repertoire, sending it ahead to teachers who then include the piece or pieces in their curriculum to learn the piece prior to the musicians’ arrival on site. Once in the school, the musicians workshop and guide the students through the piece giving the students the opportunity to actively work on the piece with professionals during the residency and then the students join the musicians for these pieces during the public performance.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Each year the scholarship program gives local students and educators in Blaine County financial support to further their education in the arts and humanities (outside of normal school hours) through four different types of scholarships. The scholarship program is made possible through funds raised at SVMoA’s Annual Wine Auction and private donations. Applications are evaluated by a committee of community members in the following areas: selected program of study, interest, experience and enthusiasm, work samples, two letters of recommendation, transcripts and financial need. The committee changes on a yearly basis. Scholarships are awarded to educators and students who have demonstrated a focused interest in an area of study and have exhausted the opportunities for learning available in this rural community. A public scholarship ceremony is held every year to celebrate scholarship recipients.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Academics

A professional museum educator, assisted by trained volunteer docents, offers students and teachers an exploration of visual art exhibitions. Tours are approximately one hour in length and are primarily offered to students in Blaine County’s private and public schools, but are open to students throughout the state of Idaho. Students engage with the exhibition idea, the museum educator and their peers through observation and discussion of contemporary and modern artwork. They also create a hands-on art project. Tours are crafted to allow students to engage with art and ideas through object-based conversation and art-making experiences, providing teachers with an experiential learning opportunity that may link and reinforce curricular themes and providing students in our rural community with a museum experience. Exhibition tours are designed to meet National Core Arts Standards in the visual arts, which stem from the four core artistic processes of creating, presenting, responding and connecting. We provide pre-visit materials to encourage classes to discuss the ideas presented in the exhibition before arriving for the tour.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Big Idea multidisciplinary projects are original programs and exhibitions that are organized to explore an idea or theme from multiple perspectives and a variety of artistic disciplines. They are designed to connect the multiple programming disciplines (visual arts, performing arts, theatre and education/humanities) and to stimulate the imagination, promote conversation, provoke thought and engage a broad spectrum of the community. Big Idea projects guide programming for a designated period of time and frequently involve collaborations with other organizations in the valley.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

American Association of Museums 2006

Awards

Governors Award for Excellence in the Arts 2004

Governor's Award

Affiliations & memberships

American Association of Museums - Member 2006

Theatre Communications Groups - Constituent Theatre 2000

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have access to free arts education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Classroom Enrichment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of programs offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Classroom Enrichment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of arts education programs offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SVMoA strives to produce excellent and innovative arts programming that creates opportunities for a broad spectrum of the community to engage in dialogue around ideas that are relevant to our time and place.

SVMoA continues to build our partnerships with area schools and educators by offering innovative arts-based learning models and by being a reliable content provider for school-aged children giving them opportunities to see and interface with art and professional artists.

SVMoA aims to increase programs and workshops where multiple generations can come together for hands-on learning and shared cultural experiences.

SVMoA continues to identify new opportunities for emerging artists, authors, musicians, and actors to expand their skills and extend their practice.

SVMoA plans to expand programs to schools in neighboring counties.

SVMoA is also developing additional performing arts offerings designed for families as well as multi-generational events.

SVMoA proactively identifies community partnerships that will expand opportunities and engage new, diverse audiences including developing large temporary public art opportunities with the City of Ketchum, the Ketchum Arts Commission, and other community partners.

SVMoA continues to seek out diverse visual and performing artists and offer installation opportunities and residencies.

SVMoA's BIG IDEAs gather works from multiple art forms, centered on a single idea. This facilitates engagement from our community no matter their preference for or familiarity with any art form.

SVMoA has been providing its community with arts and cultural programs for 50 years. Guided by our core values and commitments, our program offerings are a reflection of our desire to be a place of discovery as well as a vehicle through which people can exercise their curiosity and creativity. Critical thinking, wonder and learning are cultivated through innovative, thoughtful programs that connect us to one another, our world and ourselves.

SVMoA's current relationships with local schools enable us to continue the growth of our education programs both in and out of the schools. Our current relationships with local venues allow us to continue booking events in every corner of our community, for diverse audiences of all sizes. The steady rise in the number of our annual donors shows a willingness in our community to support The Museum.

SVMoA now provides free arts education programs to every student in Blaine County - approximately 4,000 students - reaching many students multiple times throughout the year.

SVMoA has awarded $1MM since the inception of our Scholarship Program

Additionally, in 2016, The Center's multi-disciplinary project, Craters of the Moon, received prestigious National Endowment for the Arts and Andy Warhol Foundation grants and resulted in two permanent public art installations in Ketchum, Idaho.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We endeavor to serve the entire community unbiased by race, age, ethnicity, sexual or religious orientation or otherwise.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are piloting new virtual and in-person programs for the underserved LatinX and Hispanic populations in our community as a result of many community meetings and surveys.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Inclusivity is key -- partnerships are key. We have found the feedback invaluable and in response have committed to doing better!

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Sun Valley Museum of Art
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Sun Valley Museum of Art

Board of directors
as of 3/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Ellen Gillespie

Ellen Gillespie

Linda Bowling

Wendy Pesky

Kay Hardy

Amber Busuttil Mullen

Adam Elias

Barbara Lehman

Kelly Corroon

Caroline Hobbs

Andrea Laporte

Jim Reid

Ellen James

Linda Nicholson

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/17/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.