ACCURACY IN MEDIA INC

On the front lines of the culture war.

aka AIM   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.aim.org

Mission

Accuracy in Media uses citizen activism and investigative journalism to expose media bias, corruption, and public policy failings. Our organization empowers individuals to hold journalists as well as public and private officials accountable, in order to achieve a well informed and free society.

Ruling year info

1971

President

Mr. Adam Guillette

Main address

1717 K Street Northwest Suite 900

Washington, DC 20006 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7135837

NTEE code info

Media, Communications Organizations (A30)

Printing, Publishing (A33)

Radio (A34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today’s media landscape is dramatically different from when our organization was founded in 1969. Most Americans consume their “news” online. In addition, cultural influencers in Hollywood and on social media are dramatically more effective – and more dangerous – at spreading leftist propaganda than the journalists of yesteryear. Rather than limiting their influence to newspapers, The New York Times is now creating classroom content. It has never been truer that politics is downstream from culture. As a result, Accuracy in Media is using a unique combination of investigative journalism and citizen activism to change laws and change the culture.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

AIM Report

The AIM Report, first published in 1972, is
currently the longest-running journal dedicated to exposing and correcting
media bias and errors.

The AIM Report is a valuable resource for our
thousands of members, who depend on it for the perspective and analysis they
won’t find in the “mainstream” media.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Accuracy in Media uses investigative journalism to hold public policies actors and journalists accountable.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

AIM Report

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization empowers individuals to hold journalists as well as public and private officials accountable, in order to achieve a well informed and free society.

Accuracy in Media uses citizen activism and investigative journalism to expose media bias, corruption, and public policy failings.

Accuracy in Media began engaging in investigative journalism in the 1970's and has significantly increased our capacity in the decades since.

Accuracy in Media was founded by Reed Irvine in 1969 with the goal of educating Americans about the dangers of media bias. At the time, 29 million viewers tuned in each night to watch Walter Cronkite misinform his audience about what was occurring in Vietnam.

For example, after the North Vietnamese were defeated in the Tet Offensive, Cronkite famously lied to his audience by proclaiming that the “war was now unwinnable.” His report to the American people was in direct contradiction to the facts on the ground. Regardless of what one thinks about the Vietnam War, we can all agree that Americans deserve an accurate representation of reality.

After years of effective activism, Reed Irvine and Accuracy in Media succeeded. In the words of Alex S. Jones, the director of the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, "I think AIM really was the fountainhead of the effort to denounce the liberal media, and create the image of the mainstream media as very liberal. And that effort has proved quite successful."

After Irvine passed away, The New York Times wrote, “[Accuracy in Media] paved the way for the tide of conservative talk shows, Web sites and news programming that would follow decades later.”

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We conduct 360 degree reviews with staffers, interns, and contractors.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our investive journalism program has changed structurally based on the feedback we've received from our community allies.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our organization now employs many contractors. This is structured more as a loose partnership and less as a traditional top-to-bottom boss-to-employee role.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

ACCURACY IN MEDIA INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ACCURACY IN MEDIA INC

Board of directors
as of 12/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Dan Backer

Accuracy in Media

Gene Schaerr

Niger Innis

Dan Backer

Tracy Dietz

Frank Howard

David Himes

David Keene

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.