Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colorado

All youth achieve their full potential.

aka BBBSC   |   Englewood, CO   |  www.BigLittleColorado.org

Mission

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colorado (BBBSC) is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth.

Ruling year info

1982

CEO

Ms. Elycia Cook

Main address

750 W Hampden Ave. Suite 450

Englewood, CO 80110 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7161796

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Research has shown children and teens living in poverty are at greater risk for several negative outcomes, including poor academic achievement, abuse and neglect, behavioral and socio-emotional problems, physical health problems, teen pregnancy, and dropping out of school. They are also at increased risk for homelessness, and are more likely to be underemployed or unemployed as adults. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colorado addresses these challenges by providing each child with their own mentor, who helps the child navigate unique life circumstances and supports their positive development.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Big Brothers Big Sisters Programs

BBBSC primarily serves children and teens (9-18 years old) who live in low-income households throughout metropolitan Denver and the Colorado Springs area. Many are in single parent families, some have a parent who is incarcerated, and most attend schools that have a high percentage of students receiving free or reduced-price school meals.

Across BBBSC’s three core mentoring programs (listed below), program staff carefully match youth mentees (Littles) one-to-one with adult volunteer mentors (Bigs). Children and their parents are interviewed to assess eligibility for BBBSC programs, make certain they understand what BBBSC programs do and do not provide, and to understand the child’s needs for a match. Because safety is the number one concern, all volunteers are thoroughly screened and properly trained. Matching and program placement depends many factors, including youth’s age, mentee/mentor geographic proximity, program availability, and preferences. BBBSC program staff support and monitor the matches at least once a month and administer evidence-based surveys on a set schedule to obtain pre-, post-, and long-term outcome information.

1) The Community-based Mentoring Program is the traditional, high-quality, BBBSC mentoring program. Though supported by BBBSC program staff, mentee (Little) and mentor (Big) matches make plans to meet when and where they choose, as often as two to four times each month. As the relationship grows, the mentee gains a sense of safety and emotional support, builds social and goal setting skills, and improves their self-confidence, academic achievement, and future aspirations. In Colorado Springs, a subset of matches in this program are participating in Military Mentoring, which matches mentors from the community with children who have a deployed military parent, active duty parent, or a parent killed in action.

2) The Sports Buddies Program was founded by BBBSC in 2000. In Sports Buddies, matches meet one or two times per month for sports-based activities (participatory activities or spectator events) that are planned and supervised by BBBSC staff. Sports Buddies activities deepen mentoring relationships while supporting self-confidence, goal setting, collaboration, skill-development, and healthy lifestyles. In Colorado Springs, a subset of matches in this program are participating in Bigs with Badges, which matches children with a first responder and helps build stronger bonds between first responders and the communities they serve.

3) The mentor2.0 program connects teenagers attending low-income high schools with college educated mentors. Delivered in partnership with schools, mentor2.0 builds one-to-one mentoring relationships through weekly online communication and monthly in-person group activities. BBBSC program staff teach students the College Ready curriculum in the classroom weekly, monitor weekly match communications, and host monthly group activities. The program uses proven best practices to ensure students graduate prepared for post-secondary education and the workforce.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Top 10 Most Favored and Trusted Nonprofits 2020

Awards

Top 10 Most Favored and Trusted Nonprofits 2020

Morning Consult

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019: 1470 is 91% of total Littles

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The following are BBBSC's goals as outlined in the organization's 2015-2018 strategic plan:

Goal 1: Impact - We will create meaningful, measurable life change for more of Colorado's children.

Goal 2: Sustainability - We will be excellent at fundraising basics, while innovating to fuel long-term growth.

Goal 3: Brand - We will enhance, differentiate and steward our brand, which we define as the collection of perceptions about our organization, formed in every communication, action, and interaction.

Goal 4: Culture - We will build a culture of excellence that attracts and retains the highest caliber employees and volunteers.

 Volunteer Recruitment, Screening and Training: Big Brothers Big Sisters' highest priority is the safety of our children and mentors. We recruit potential volunteer mentors and then complete a rigorous screening, background check, and orientation process before selecting mentors for our programs. We also provide on-going training opportunities for volunteer mentors during the time they are matched with a child.

 Youth Engagement: Big Brothers Big Sisters conducts outreach to children and families in our target population, processes child referrals, conducts youth assessments and provides an orientation to youth and their families or caregivers.

 Matching: Big Brothers Big Sisters carefully matches children and volunteer mentors based on the common interests and preferences of each party.

 Enrichment Activities: Big Brothers Big Sisters provides enrichment activities for matches in our programs. Delivered in partnership with businesses and community organizations, these activities are designed to deepen mentoring relationships while supporting goal setting, school engagement, healthy choices, skill development and career exploration. Last year we also launched a “Not So Little Group", which focuses on youth ages 13-18 and provides activities, resources, and on-going support specific to the needs of this age group.

 Supervision: Big Brothers Big Sisters provides ongoing supervision of mentoring relationships through regular communication with youth, their families/caregivers, and mentors. During monthly supervision contacts, staff provide guidance and support and monitor the progress of each relationship. Our staff also offer resources, activity suggestions, and potential interventions to support healthy development and educational success.

BBBSC's programs are based on the Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) model, which has been researched and is recognized as an effective, evidence-based strategy for improving academic outcomes and preventing violence and substance abuse among at-risk children/youth. For example:

 The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) recognizes BBBS as a “model program."

 The US Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention rates BBBS Community Based Mentoring Program as an “Exemplary" evidence-based prevention program.

 The Children's Defense Fund states that mentoring through BBBS has been “proven successful" in prevention activities.

 The National Dropout Prevention Center/Network recognizes the BBBS model as “exemplary" in addressing risk factors associated with dropping out of school.

BBBSC's newest program, mentor2.0, combines the BBBS model with one developed by iMentor out of New York City. iMentor has developed a proprietary email platform and college success curriculum for mentoring at-risk high school students. In iMentor, mentoring takes place through both in-person and on-line interactions. iMentor has been successfully mentoring high school students since 1999, and has achieved impressive outcomes related to high school graduation and post-secondary success.

The BBBS model is unique in that each child/youth is matched one-to-one with an adult volunteer mentor, and each relationship is carefully managed by a professional staff member who is trained to monitor, support, and evaluate mentoring relationships. Our model is also unique in that it impacts children/youth across multiple domains of development, helping the whole child develop into a healthy, productive adult member of society. Further, although each local BBBS affiliate is autonomous, the integrity of the BBBS model is protected through a national infrastructure of quality standards for recruitment, screening, matching, and supervision of mentoring relationships. Finally, program evaluation is driven by nationally-validated survey tools (Strength of Relationship and Youth Outcomes Survey) which are used by BBBS affiliates across the country, allowing both local and national evaluation results to be analyzed, reported, and incorporated into future program design.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colorado (BBBSC) supported 1,736 one-to-one mentoring relationships in FY18, including 1,308 in metro Denver and 428 in Colorado Springs.

Outcomes
Strength of Relationship Survey – 90% of youth rated their relationship as strong or very strong, demonstrating they are bonding with a caring adult mentor and their mentoring relationship is developing positively.

Match Length – 68% of matches lasted more than 12 months.

Youth Outcomes Survey – Of the children in our programs who completed a follow-up YOS in FY17:
 95% had positive outcomes in five of the seven outcome areas.
 49% had positive outcomes in all seven outcome areas.

Our goal was for at least 75% of children to maintain or improve in specific outcome areas related to social competence, educational success, and risky or delinquent behavior. Results for specific outcome areas include:
 95% maintained or improved in the area “Social Acceptance," which is linked to school achievement, improved conduct and a lower likelihood of dropping out of school.
 93% maintained or improved in “Scholastic Competency," which is associated with better mental health and higher grades.
 75% maintained or improved in “Educational Expectations," which has been shown to have longitudinal association with school performance and standardized test scores.
 88% maintained or improved in “Risk Attitudes," which are linked to risky or delinquent behavior such as alcohol and drug use, breaking school rules and violent behavior.

Grades – 88% of children maintained or improved their grades in math, language arts, science, and/or social studies.

Mentor2.0 2016-17 Results
 248 students matched in Denver and 132 in Colorado Springs.
 90% of mentees reported wanting to go to college, and 84% expect to go to college.
 97% of matches met the online engagement participation target; 66% also met the in-person meeting benchmark.
 85% of mentees reported that they trust their mentor, 51% said they go to their mentor when they need support, and 84% said that their mentor is a good match for them.
 53% of all students maintained or improved their school attendance. Of those who were chronically absent during the 2015-16 schoolyear, 51% showed improvement after being in the mentor2.0 program.

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colorado
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colorado

Board of directors
as of 4/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Doug Dell

KeyBank


Board co-chair

Kristin Theilking

Vendavo

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data