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Trust For Public Land HQ

Land for People

aka Trust for Public Land   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.tpl.org

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Mission

The Trust for Public Land's mission is to create parks and protect land for people, ensuring healthy, livable communities for generations to come.

Ruling year info

1978

President & CEO

Ms Diane Regas

Main address

PO Box 889336

Los Angeles, CA 90088-9336 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7222333

NTEE code info

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Trust for Public Land works to protect the places people care about and to create close-to-home parks—particularly in and near cities, where 80 percent of Americans live. Our goal is to ensure that every child has easy access to a safe place to play in nature.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Parks for People

The Trust for Public Land works in cities and suburbs across America to ensure that everyone, in particular every child, enjoys close-to-home access to a park, playground, garden, or natural area.

For the 80 percent of Americans who live in or near a city, neighborhood parks offer the closest connection to nature. Yet, today there is only 1 park for every 14,000 people in America. As a result, an entire generation is growing up disconnected from nature and the outdoors, missing out on the fun, fitness, and relaxation that parks provide.

In park-poor neighborhoods, children play in streets, alleyways, or vacant lots instead of on grassy meadows or soccer fields. Or they simply stay inside—a national crisis of inactivity that has contributed to higher rates of obesity, diabetes, asthma, anxiety, and depression.

Research shows that parks promote public health and revitalize local economies. They make cities more energy-efficient and less vulnerable to the effects of climate change. They connect neighbors to the great outdoors and to each other.

The Trust for Public Land was founded to conserve land for people to enjoy as parks, gardens, and other natural places, and we’re still the only large conservation organization focused on this goal. Today, nearly ten million Americans live within a ten-minute walk of a park or natural area we’ve protected. We’re working toward a day when everyone has easy access to a safe, green place to play.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Trust for Public Land conserves wilderness, including places that safeguard clean drinking water and preserve the natural beauty of coasts and waterways.

The American conservation movement was born from a shared desire to protect our wildest places. Early visionaries proposed setting aside land to safeguard natural resources and connect people to the great outdoors. These park pioneers believed that as cities grew, access to nature would become one measure of a great nation.

Today, the wilderness and waterways they protected are integral to our health, happiness, and quality of life. In addition to providing unsurpassed opportunities for recreation and renewal, these special places perform critical behind-the-scenes services—from helping mitigate the effects of climate change to protecting clean drinking water for millions of Americans.

With an estimated two million acres of land lost to development every year, preserving these places is more important than ever. The Trust for Public Land helps communities nationwide balance the demands of growth with the protection of wilderness and open space. We use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to identify and prioritize conservation goals—then we employ our finance, legal, and transaction expertise to accomplish them. Whether improving the health of a local bay or preserving public access to a beloved mountain trail, we're protecting life-giving land and water resources for all to enjoy.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Trust for Public Land protects farms, ranches, forests, and other working lands that foster a healthy, vibrant agricultural system and support land-based livelihoods.

America’s farms, ranches, and working forests yield food and timber, support local economies, safeguard clean water, and form some of our nation’s most beautiful landscapes. Whether a deep northern forest, an emerald mosaic of ranchland in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains, or the last farm in a New England town, working lands supply valuable resources and a link to our shared rural heritage.

These places are too important to lose. But in many communities, rising property values are making it difficult for ranchers and farmers to pay taxes on their land, or to resist the pressure to sell to eager developers.

The Trust for Public Land partners with landowners and public agencies to keep working lands working, preserving their benefits to the environment and the greater community. Often, we use conservation easements to safeguard property from development while compensating the landowner for the value such development might represent. This strategy conserves productive land and enables ranching, farming, or sustainable forestry to continue.

Our work protects both land and livelihoods—beautiful farms, meadows, and forests that support our jobs, our health, and our quality of life.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2017

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to create parks and protect land for people, ensuring healthy, livable communities for generations to come.

We plan—we help communities identify the most important land for conservation—and create and carry out a plan to protect it. We fund—we help local governments craft measures and pass legislation that secures funding to create parks and protect land for people. We protect—from pocket parks to vast backcountry escapes, our real estate experts help partners acquire and protect land for the public to enjoy. And we create—we engage communities in designing and building innovative parks that foster a strong sense of place and connection to nature.

Our success starts with our staff—some of the brightest, boldest, and most creative placemakers in the country. We understand local needs because we are locals—working from more than 30 field offices nationwide, we craft customized solutions to local conservation challenges, drawing from the resources and experience of a national organization.

● We've worked for more than 40 years to conserve land for people.
● Since 1972, we've completed more than 5,000 park and conservation projects across 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, conserving more than 3.5 million acres of land, from the inner city to the wilderness.
● We are the national leader in creating public funds for parks and open space. Since 1996, we've helped generate nearly $68 billion in public funding through ballot measures supported by nearly 100 million voters in 37 states.
● We've created, sustained, or supported 340 local land trusts nationwide.
● Millions of Americans live within a 10-minute walk of a park or natural area we've helped create, and countless more visit every year.
● But today we're dreaming even bigger. We are leading a national movement to put a park or natural area within a 10-minute walk of every home, in every American city.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently

Financials

Trust For Public Land
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Trust For Public Land

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Lucas St. Clair

Stephen W. Baird

Baird & Warner

George Bell

Luis Benitez

Mickey Fearn

Whitney Hatch

Issue One

Happy Haynes

Ben Jealous

Jennifer Jones

Chris Knight

Christopher G. Lea

Joseph Lipscomb

Ignacia S. Moreno

The iMoreno Group

Caroline Niemczyk

Michael Parish

David Poppe

Tom S. Reeve

Jeff Resnick

Laura Richards

Friends of Carrollton GreenBelt

Lex Sant

Sant Foundation

Lucas St. Clair

Sheryl Crockett Tishman

Telluride Mountainfilm

F. Jerome Tone

Hellman Properties

Taylor Toynes

Keith E. Weaver

Susan D. Whiting

Florence Williams

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/27/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/02/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.