EAST OAKLAND YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTER

Building character to build communities since 1978

aka EOYDC   |   Oakland, CA   |  www.eoydc.org

Mission

Located in one of the poorest and most violent neighborhoods in the city of Oakland, East Oakland Youth Development Center (EOYDC) has been serving children and youth since 1978. Our mission is to develop the social and leadership capacities of youth and young adults so they achieve excellence in education, career, and service to their communities.

Our organization delivers comprehensive, evidence-based interventions that help young people transform their lives by building resiliency, preparing for educational career success, and igniting positive change. Each year, we serve more than 1,200 children and youth ages 5-24, helping them remain on track academically and lead healthy, productive lives.

Ruling year info

1974

President and CEO

Ms. Regina Jackson

Main address

8200 International Boulevard

Oakland, CA 94621 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7334590

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

EOYDC’s target population experiences significant disparities and associated barriers to academic success including a high risk of high school dropout, which has lifetime economic consequences. While Oakland is facing unprecedented economic growth, it has been accompanied by increased income inequality that makes it all the more difficult to overcome poverty. For residents of East Oakland, the benefits of the economic boom are not trickling down; rather, they are leading to displacement and increased homelessness. Already lacking stability, youth are faced with further instability and disruption. This compounds the chronic stress of poverty and exacerbates mental health issues like complex post-traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) that youth who grow up in neighborhoods plagued by poverty, crime, and violence are more likely to experience. These factors combine to place youth at high risk of academic under-performance and high-risk behavior.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

After School Leadership Academy

EOYDC’s After School Leadership Academy (ASLA) develops the leadership, academic, and life skills of students grades K-8. ASLA provides a cascading mentorship model, in which high school and college students are trained to coach elementary and middle school students, under the management of a highly experienced youth development professional. An average of 95 to 100 students participate each week, with over 130 unique students participating each year.

Operating in partnership with the Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) and local charter schools, ASLA focuses on developing academic skills aligned with evidenced-based practices. This is achieved through homework assistance, supplemented by learning games that facilitate a deeper understanding of core academic concepts. Students receive support in enhancing their socio-emotional development through activities that focus on character development, self-awareness, and leadership skills. Since many of our children are exposed to trauma that leaves them vulnerable to conditions such as complex-post traumatic stress disorder—which is shown to impact their ability to learn, concentrate, and perform academically—ASLA also integrates Trauma-Informed Care practices to meet their needs.

In addition to homework support, tutoring, and enrichment activities (inclusive of African Dance, Culinary Arts, Ceramics, Painting & Drawing, and Martial Arts), ASLA offers field trips and learning labs to reinforce learning while making it fun and engaging. Students are also offered free daily meals—a critical resource in the food desert of East Oakland.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Research shows that middle school students across the country are the most likely to underperform. To address this, The Bridge identifies students who are at risk of academic and social disengagement at the start of 6th grade and provide them with intensive support throughout all three years of middle school. Through a combination of evidenced based practices—youth advocacy and coaching, intensive literacy support, socio-emotional learning, and parent engagement—the Bridge works with students who are below or at grade level to enable them to strengthen all of the critical skills needed to transition successfully into high school and be on track for college.

EOYDC partners with three local middle schools to identify 6th grade students who are performing up to three levels below grade level on the Scholastic Reading Inventory.

Population(s) Served
Adults

PTC2 is designed to imbue a college-going culture into participants and to ensure that they have high educational and career goals for themselves. PTC2 features two core pillars: college persistence and career advancement. The college persistence pillar helps students improve their academic performance while earning a high school diploma, as well as matriculate into, fund, and complete college. After-school sessions provide workshops and individualized coaching to enhance knowledge and skills in key areas including college admission, financing college, and life skills. PTC2 also cultivates a college going culture through local and national college tours, which also connect youth to professionals in an array of careers across the country. The career advancement pillar prepares youth for the workforce and provides opportunities to discover a wide range of career paths through workshops, field trips, and work-based learning positions.

The program also includes Brotherhood Across America, EOYDC's college and professional mentoring components to support college persistence, success and connection to larger professional networks.

Population(s) Served
Adults

EOYDC offers the Education Empowerment program for young adults who have not successfully completed high school and are in need of a second chance. Education Empowerment focuses on prepping students for the High School Equivalency Test, while simultaneously providing them with critical life skills and personal development coaching. Once students have successfully obtained their High School Equivalency Certificate, they often transition into the PTC2 program where they are supported through entry into the community college system and/or workforce.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

Project JOY provides employment training, work experience and job placement to low-income youth ages 14-24. The program provides 120 youth annually with work-readiness training that equips them to enter and succeed in employment, places 70 youth in paid employment as after-school and summer program leaders at EOYDC, and provides job placement services to 50 youth not placed at EOYDC so that they can obtain jobs with other employers.
Youth placed at EOYDC work as youth staff leading activities including educational support, arts, and recreational enrichment.

Population(s) Served
Adults

EOYDC’s Kuumbaa Arts Program is a core component of our comprehensive approach to developing the social, academic, and leadership capacities of children and youth living in East Oakland. Classes take place during after-school hours. Guided by professional artists, more than 10 classes are offered each week including basic and advanced training in music, painting, ceramics, photography, West African dance, and digital media arts. Special classes such as printmaking and sculpture are also scheduled. We also provide summer arts programming five days a week in a wide array of areas, including music, dance and visual arts.

The program also takes students on fieldtrips to venues such as the Oakland Museum of California, Asian Art Museum, African American Museum and Library, Joyce Gordon Art Gallery, as well as live dance and music performances at the Berkeley Playhouse and Zellerbach Theater. Because the young people in our program rarely have the opportunity to leave their neighborhood, these excursions play an integral role in exposing them to the arts and broadening their horizons. We also offer students the opportunity to perform and showcase their art at EOYDC and other venues, where students can share their skills and creativity with family and community.

The program also partners with organizations like the Oakland Public Conservatory of Music (OPC), allowing us to offer classes in percussion, wind instruments and piano at EOYDC four times a week. In addition, we host the Lyric Performing Arts Academy, an award-winning dance company started by two EOYDC alumnae that teaches jazz, tap, ballet and contemporary dance in our studio three times a week. EOYDC also sponsors the annual ARC Youth Fest Oakland and our youth volunteer at this annual event. Also, our partnership with the Sepia Arts Collective resulted in an onsite event this year celebrating the legacy of the Black Panther Party in which EOYDC youth presented.

Population(s) Served
Adults

EOYDC's Health and Wellness programs enhance the health and fitness of youth. Activities include health education classes, cooking classes, a newly revised martial arts curriculum, yoga classes, youth basketball and invitational basketball programs, a track and field club, weight training, and a seasonal rowing club. To build family relationships and community connections, EOYDC also offers classes such as yoga and martial arts to parents and family members.

EOYDC offers health and wellness classes five days per week, two hours per day. Because some classes repeat two times per week, EOYDC offers more than 80 hours of training and instruction each month. All programs include conditioning, warm up exercises, jogging, running and jumping. Special clinics are facilitated by our partnerships with professional sports teams including the Golden State Warriors, Oakland Athletics, and Oakland Raiders. We also host Belt Promotion Ceremonies for our martial arts program and Basketball Tournaments are held for the community on a regular basis.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents, Low-income people

Related Program

Pathway to College and Career (PTC2)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Children, Adolescents, Preteens, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Enrollment was decreased in 2020 due to COVID-19 pandemic; However, a hundreds of non-enrolled children, youth, and families received support services (free food, PPE, etc.) during this time.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Field trips were paused in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic

Number of clients placed in internships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults, Low-income people

Related Program

Project JOY

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

EOYDC builds the capacities of youth (ages 5-24) by leveraging connections to relatable, nurturing, and invested adults. Within these connections we create a supportive and healing environment while emphasizing four elements of success: character (trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, citizenship, fairness, and caring); readiness (in the areas of leadership, academics, and career); access (to social capital and opportunities), and socio-emotional learning (enhancing self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship skills).

Over the past ten years, EOYDC has primarily focused on developing and strengthening a comprehensive continuum of educational programs that provide support from kindergarten all the way through undergraduate and graduate studies. Now that EOYDC has established this strong foundation of educationally-focused programming, one of our key strategic goals for the next 3-5 years is to ensure young people are prepared for meaningful, well-paid careers that leverage their talents and passion. We recognize that formal and informal education are essential to this, and that young people need exposure to diverse career paths. We also recognize that youth require a sense of safety, well-being, and support to meet their potential and that engaging in fun, stimulating activities enriches their experience.

EOYDC will work towards this overarching goal by integrating age-appropriate content designed to help youth explore different career paths and be more competitive for those opportunities down the line across its four core programming areas: 1) Education – teaching and exposing our young people to ideas, concepts, and information that will ensure they possess the socio-emotional, navigational, and academic skills needed to obtain the formal education that can drastically improve their chances of earning a meaningful, well-paying career; 2) Arts – providing opportunities for young people to develop creative skill sets, while offering exposure to career paths and networks in the visual and performing arts; 3) Wellness – facilitating the overall wellbeing of young people through exercise and nutrition to ensure students are operating at maximum capacity when striving to achieve their goals, as well as exposure to careers and social capital in the health and athletic fields; 4) Careers – providing direct career-readiness training, internships, and job placement so that our participants are able to have financial stability while building skills and gaining experience.

In keeping with research that shows how critical sustained mentorship relationships are to youth, EOYDC’s continuum of programs provides age-appropriate support from kindergarten all the way through post-secondary studies and into career. This allows us to engage children and youth on a long-term basis to provide support, stability and permanency. Integral to this strategy of long-term engagement is EOYDC’s cascading mentorship approach, wherein older youth are trained to serve as peer mentors to younger youth through mentorship, coaching, tutoring, and instruction. In addition to creating growth opportunities for both youth mentors and mentees, this strategy creates a strong leadership pipeline within the organization. As a result, 58% of EOYDC’s full-time employees are program alumni. This, combined with youth involvement in program design and implementation, ensures that EOYDC is guided by the experience of those it serves.

EOYDC recognizes that youth in our community are more likely to face high levels of stress, trauma, and detrimental social pressures. Oakland is among the five deadliest cities in the nation, and EOYDC is located in the heart of eight of the ten highest stress police beats in the city where the bulk of shootings and other violent crimes occur. Exposure to poverty, crime, and excessive violence is a major contributing factor to Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) and chronic stress; both of which are shown to negatively impact youth’s short- and long-term life outcomes. As such, an integrated trauma-informed care approach is key to EOYDC’s strategy. Through a comprehensive set of trauma-informed approaches and practices, staff learn to support youth in adopting healthy coping mechanisms and guiding them to productive behaviors while participants learn

Since 1978, EOYDC has worked to overcome the deeply-entrenched intergenerational poverty and systematic barriers that many youth in East Oakland face. EOYDC is uniquely positioned to meet these needs given our deep community knowledge, extensive cultural competency, and trust based on 40 years of work with youth and their families. Our staff members--most of whom are program alumni from the local community--are well positioned to build authentic connections with the community members we serve.

EOYDC’s President & CEO, Regina Jackson, has spent 27 years building EOYDC’s reach and impact. Regarded as a global thought leader in youth development, Ms. Jackson, has made it her life’s mission to support children’s futures and is often sought out as a subject matter expert both domestically and internationally. In 2016, the University of San Francisco conferred the Doctor of Humane Letters upon Ms. Jackson in recognize of her extensive leadership and experience in the field of youth development. Selena Wilson serves as EOYDC’s Vice President of Organizational Effectiveness. An EOYDC alumna, Ms. Wilson joined EOYDC’s team in early 2015. Ms. Wilson has a Masters of Science in Learning and Organizational Change from Northwestern and deep experience in youth development, leadership development, and organizational effectiveness. Landon Hill, Sr. Manager of Program Effectiveness has worked in youth development for more than a decade. Also an EOYDC alumnus, Mr. Hill holds an MA in Social & Cultural Analysis of Education from Cal State University, Long Beach and is currently pursuing an Ed.D at the University of San Francisco. EOYDC’s leadership team is supported by a group of highly skilled and dedicated staff members.

As a place-based organization, EOYDC is centrally located in East Oakland so it is easily accessible to the population we serve. In 2015, EOYDC completed an $11.5 million capital improvement project to renovate, repair, and expand its facility. This resulted in 5,300 additional square feet of space and more state of the art classrooms and security features. With a virtually free ($1/year) lifetime lease on its building, EOYDC is able to ensure sustainability of the facility.

EOYDC strives to offer the majority of programs and services free of charge so that young people’s economic status does not bar them from participation. As such, EOYDC has developed a diverse stream of funders, a board who is highly engaged in the organization and in fundraising, and a ~$11 million endowment fund to support these efforts.

EOYDC has numerous partners across the public and private sectors including the Oakland Unified School District, Peralta Community College District, Southwest Airlines, Kaiser Permanente, Clorox, the Golden State Warriors, and the Oakland A’s. In addition to funding and program-delivery support, EOYDC leverages partnerships such as these to create internship and employment placement opportunities for our young people.

Over the past year, EOYDC has made significant progress against interim goals across the program continuum including the following highlights: Over 150 youth received job training; EOYDC Interns earned over $300,000 in compensation collectively; 95% of Pathway to College seniors graduated from high school on time; 80% of students enrolled in EOYDC’s High School Equivalency prep program (Education Empowerment) earned their High School Equivalency certificate within 12 months; 90% of Education Empowerment students successfully transitioned to the workforce and/or an educational institution within six months of obtaining their high school equivalency.

EOYDC recently completed the three-year PropelNext initiative; a capacity-building program funded by the Edna McConnell Clark and Hewlett Foundations, geared towards helping youth-focused nonprofits enhance their program models and develop organizational cultures that practice ongoing learning and evaluation. EOYDC now captures outcome metrics specific to each of its programs and is in the process of applying a rigorous program design methodology to more precisely define the dosage, duration, progress indicators, and outcomes of each core program model. The insights gained from analysis of these metrics are helping leadership identify and implement program improvements, and to better determine progress against long-term goals. EOYDC’s participation in this initiative has already resulted in the successful implementation of a new middle school success program (The Bridge) and the implementation of a new centralized data management system.

EOYDC’s President & CEO, Regina Jackson, was selected for a 2017-2020 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Interdisciplinary Research Leaders Fellowship. This initiative brings together 15 teams consisting of community leaders and expert researchers from across the country to address persistent health challenges, including the upstream factors EOYDC’s programs are designed to address. Through this work and in concert with other efforts, EOYDC is formalizing its intermediary role in mentoring nonprofits engaged in youth job training and coaching them in how to adopt and implement EOYDC’s Job Training for Success (JTS) curriculum. The team adapted this job training curriculum for widespread use and is studying its impact on youth’s and employer’s experiences, and on acquisition of human and social capital by urban youth participating in the City of Oakland’s Mayor’s summer jobs program. Drawing on feedback from participants and outcome metrics, the EOYDC team modified the curriculum for an entry-level job environment. The team is in the process of developing a train-the-trainer model and will deliver this training to all youth-serving organizations participating in the Mayor’s 2019 Program. The findings from the research will be leveraged to develop a best practice model for replication across the country.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    EOYDC serves children, youth, and young adults ages 5-24, with a primary focus on Black and Brown youth living in low income households in East Oakland, California.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To identify potential strategic partnerships, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    EOYDC has recently changed our program delivery model for our Pathway to College & Career program based on student feedback regarding schedule conflicts. Previously, youth had to register for a full semester of programming. The new program model allows students to register for shorter-term workshop series that are 3-6 weeks in length. Students have indicated that this modular program delivery method works better for them, as it allows them have a cohesive programming experience while balancing other commitments such as seasonal competitive sports.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    For decades, EOYDC has provided direct opportunities for youth to play an active role in decision-making as it relates to programming. Through our participation in a capacity building initiative geared specifically towards enhancing our ability to collect and analyze stakeholder feedback (the Listen4Good initiative), EOYDC developed more rigorous, multi-pronged, age-appropriate processes for collecting stakeholder feedback across the wide-range of age-groups that we serve (ages 5-24). For example, we have given elementary school students the opportunity to weigh in on the focus of rotational enrichment classes; we have given middle and high school students the opportunity to plan and implement community service events (to include the development of associated event budgets), etc.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We have difficulty getting the ideal level of feedback from the parents of our participants,

Financials

EAST OAKLAND YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

EAST OAKLAND YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTER

Board of directors
as of 9/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cheryl Wright

Cheryl Wright

Retired

David Jones

Brennan Jones and Associates LLC

Treva Reid

City of Oakland

Russell Gatewood

Independent Marketing Consultant

Adante Pointer

Pointer & Buelna LLP

Erin Dangerfield Fantin

Golden State Warriors

Keith Dodds

Peralta Colleges

Ashley Shay

The Clorox Company

Hezekiah Burton

PayPal Holdings, Inc.

Candace Harris

Lawrence Livermore Labs

Zeydi Gutierrez

AB&I Foundry

Monika Brooks

California State University, Hayward

Charleton Lightfoot

Oakland Fire Department

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/16/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/15/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.