PLATINUM2024

Firefighters Burn Institute

aka FFBI   |   Sacramento, CA   |  www.ffburn.org

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Mission

The Firefighters Burn Institute is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization founded by Sacramento Fire Captain Cliff Haskell and the Sacramento Area Firefighters, Local 522 in 1973 for the purpose of establishing a local burn treatment facility; providing recovery programs for burn survivors; promoting fire and burn prevention through public education; funding education for medical burn team professionals, firefighters, and burn survivors; and supporting burn treatment and rehabilitation research.

Notes from the nonprofit

In 2023 the Firefighters Burn Institute celebrates 50 years of providing free programs and services to the burn community. What began in 1973 with one person in a small corner office of the now historic Fire Station No. 9, FFBI has grown into one of the largest firefighter-run nonprofits in the nation. If you have a family member, friend or colleague who experiences a serious burn injury, please reach out to us ~ our recovery and reintegration programs and services are available to burn survivors of all ages, from all states, and are free of charge thanks to donors like you.

Ruling year info

1978

Executive Director

Joe Pick

Director

Rachel Crowell

Main address

3101 Stockton Blvd.

Sacramento, CA 95820 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Firefighters Pacific Burn Institute

EIN

23-7364927

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Fire Prevention / Protection / Control (M24)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Firefighters Burn Institute works to serve burn survivors through recovery and reintegration programs ranging from youth and family camps to retreats for adults with burn injuries and monthly peer support meetings. A serious burn injury can feel very isolating and providing survivors with a community can help folks get back to life after their trauma. To ensure the highest quality of care possible, the Firefighters Burn Institute sends numerous healthcare professionals from local hospitals to conferences like the American Burn Association Annual Meeting where professionals can learn and ask questions about the latest in burn research. Through our prevention programs, we teach youth about fire safety and burn prevention at events around the region. FFBI works closely with local fire and law agencies for youth who have exhibited fireplay and hosts an academy to educate firesetters and their caregivers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Outreach

Provide burn program information to organizations, groups and individuals; provide education and publicity about the availability of burn programs and services; give reports, make public presentations and increase awareness about the Firefighters Burn Institute; collaborate with other non-profit organizations and individuals; contribute to other organizations with similar purposes and missions; and recognized and encourage those who support burn care, prevention and recovery.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
People with disabilities

BurnNet ~ a twice monthly burn survivor support group co-facilitated with UC Davis Health.

Burn Survivor Retreats ~ an annual retreat for adult burn survivors where personal growth is experienced and new coping skills are obtained while meeting others who are going through similar situations

Family Burn Relief ~ dependent on the individual needs of the family, assistance with mental health services, hotel costs, groceries and gasoline may be offered.

Firefighters Kids Camp ~ a week long, life enriching, fun filled camp for burn survivors ages 6 17 and their siblings encouraging personal growth alongside other children in various stages of recovery.

Liaison Response Team ~ a team of firefighters dedicated to supporting the well-being of firefighters & their families in the aftermath of a burn injury.

Little Heroes Family Burn Camp ~ a three day recovery program designed to help young burn survivors ages 1 6 and their families learn to cope with the challenges of burn recovery.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
People with disabilities
Women and girls
LGBTQ people

The Youth Firesetter Program (YFP) is an intervention program for youth (ages 5-17) who
demonstrate a tendency to misuse fire. The program is led by fire, probation, burn and healthcare
professionals who provide a coordinated effort in helping youth firesetters and their families receive
the assistance they need through assessments, psychological referrals, and education. The Fire Safety Academy teaches youth and their families safe and responsible behaviors related to
fire use as well as the financial, emotional, and social consequences of firesetting. The three-session
academy course, consisting of nine hours of synchronous learning, allows youth to attend age-appropriate
classes, while parents/caregivers attend informational training seminars.

Safety Fairs are hosted and coordinated to bring the message of burn prevention and fire safety to large numbers of people.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
People with other disabilities
LGBTQ people
Emergency responders

Clinical and laboratory research grants are awarded to researchers and burn care professionals in an effort to gain new knowledge and insight to facilitate advancements in burn care and improve treatment of burn injuries.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
People with other disabilities
LGBTQ people
Emergency responders

Training and education of burn care professionals, firefighters, first responders and staff is accomplished through sponsoring attendance at conferences, workshops, conventions, meetings and other educational opportunities. Education also encompasses hosting and offering educational workshops and classes and continuing support of educational opportunities revolving around burn care and recovery.  Educational scholarships for burn survivors to support vocational education and any form of post-high school education are also available through the Firefighters Burn Institute.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Liaison Response Team (LRT) is made up of firefighters whose mission is to provide assistance to firefighters, their families and their department in the aftermath of a burn injury. LRT members are dedicated to the well-being and recovery of their fellow brother and sister firefighters and understand the importance of help and emotional support during critical times. The LRT also ensures the firefighter’s family is taken care of through meals, housing or by making other special arrangements. The Firefighters Burn Institute provides resources to also assist with post recovery including PTSD treatment, peer support groups and funding to send the firefighter to burn survivor support conferences.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2023, over $57K was awarded in scholarships to burn survivors, burn care professionals, firefighters, and staff to attend the American Burn Asso. Conference, the World Burn Congress, and college.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fire Prevention Education - approximately 3000 individuals are reached annually through our Annual Safety Fair, Camp Smokey, Youth Firesetter Program, Night at the Fire Museum, and more.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to provide scholarships to:

*50 adult burn survivors to attend our annual Beyond Surviving Adult Burn Survivor's Retreat & World Burn Congress

*50 youth burn survivors to attend our annual Firefighters Kids Camp

*12 families with young burn survivors to attend our annual Little Heroes Family Burn Camp

*25 burn care professionals to attend the American Burn Association Annual Meeting and other regional educational conferences

* Free events throughout the year to burn community members: access to professional baseball, basketball, and soccer; our community picnic, stand-up paddleboarding.

* Free peer support meetings for burn survivors and loved ones; more than 150 registrants annually that are not regionally restricted

FFBI was initially founded in 1973 to establish a burn unit in Sacramento. In 1974, the Firefighters Burn Institute Regional Burn Center at UC Davis Medical Center was underway and FFBI committed to expanding the mission to aftercare, prevention, and education. FFBI has a network of hundreds of burn survivors and volunteers, whether they be civilian or firefighters, and we offer programming year-round for this network, free of charge.

We accept up to 50 children for our week-long Firefighters Kids Camp each summer and campers attend at no cost to them. Our organization is constantly working to create relevant and plentiful opportunities for burn survivors and co-survivor loved ones to interact and build connections and community.

Reaching more adult and youth burn survivors through community outreach programs and educational opportunities

Enhancing the lives of burn survivors through awarding the Cliff Haskell Perpetual Scholarship to further their education.

Through the following methods, the Firefighters Burn Institute can maintain its operations:

* Hosting fundraisers like our "Fill the Boot for Burns" Boot Drive, Birdies for Burns Golf Tournament, Cornhole Tournament, Luau on the Links, and more.

* Increasing public awareness through attendance at an average of 20 community outreach platforms and safety fairs annually, including the California State Fair at Camp Smokey, providing fire safety and prevention information, as well as information on our survivor programs.

* Working closely with individuals and businesses on third-party fundraisers.

* Seizing grant writing opportunities.

* Having a close connection to the local media.

* Like a well oiled machine, our staff has proven themselves capable of collectively managing all of the strategies outlined above

* We have developed healthy and lasting relationships with burn survivors, firefighters, volunteers, sponsors, vendors and donors

* We continue to remain debt-free

Expansion of programs – BurnNet Survivors meetings have been adapted to a hybrid format to accommodate survivors outside of the immediate Sacramento region. Additionally, more educational programming and another offering of peer support has been included on the virtual calendar to reach more individuals. Speakers at educational sessions have included plastic surgeons, social workers, wig experts, and dietitians.

The Adult Retreat has been able to welcome burn survivors from across the country. Our fire and burn prevention work at Camp Smokey during the California State Fair educates approximately 3,000 youth and adults each year. The Firefighters Burn Institute has partnered with the Phoenix Society of Burn Survivors in a community initiative to broaden avenues of peer-to-peer support, called SOAR (Survivors Offering Assistance in Recovery).

With the help of generously donated recreational equipment, FFBI has been able to take burn survivors on Stand-Up Paddleboard outings, providing people with a way to challenge themselves with a supportive group. FFBI’s flagship program, Firefighters Kids Camp, continues to attract young burn survivors for a week each summer to connect with their peers. Similarly, Little Heroes Family Burn Camp hosts families with burn survivors ages one to six annually for a weekend of learning and growth in a nonjudgemental environment.

What's Next:
* Increased marketing efforts utilizing Constant Contact & social media
* Increased grant writing efforts
* Numerous 3rd party fundraisers
* Introduction of Golf, Cornhole, and Pickleball tournament fundraisers

After marking our 50th anniversary in 2023, FFBI is looking forward to continuing to provide relevant programs, free of charge, to members of the burn community. FFBI is looking to expand community outings for youth and adult survivors to allow participants to both explore the local area and build confidence in a group setting. FFBI has diversified fundraising events with the changing social tastes of our local community and we continue to engage with our firefighter and civilian supporters.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Firefighters Burn Institute
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Firefighters Burn Institute

Board of directors
as of 06/03/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Trevor Jamison

Sacramento Metro Fire District

Dustin Rodriques

Sacramento Metro Fire District

Sean Scollard

Sacramento Metro Fire District

Pete Votava

Sacramento Metro Fire District

Bryant Powell

Cosumnes Fire Department

Ryan Henry

Sacramento Metro Fire District

John Collins

Sacramento Fire Department

Jeremy Gardella

Sacramento Fire Department

Jeremy Crawford

Sacramento Metro Fire District

Greg Fonts

District

Mike Gildone

Sacramento Metro Fire District

Jeremy Gardella

Sacramento Fire Department

Brandon Doughty

Sacramento Fire Department

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/3/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.