International Women's Health Coalition

A Bold and Independent Voice for the Rights of Women and Girls

aka IWHC   |   New York, NY   |  www.iwhc.org

Mission

In order to achieve gender justice, IWHC advances the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and adolescent girls, by: -Funding and supporting feminist leaders, organizations, and movements, primarily in the Global South. -Advocating for international and US policies, programs, and funding, and holding governments to their commitments. -Generating knowledge and leading dialogues on critical and emergent issues.

Notes from the nonprofit

Since its founding, IWHC has been a bold and independent voice for the rights of women and girls—especially the most marginalized and vulnerable. IWHC passionately believes that women and girls must have full and unfettered access to sexual and reproductive health information, education, and services, without discrimination, in order to fully realize their own potential. This is not only essential for building healthy communities, it is a fundamental human right. Addressing the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls is a prerequisite to achieving gender justice.

Ruling year info

1991

President

Ms. Françoise Girard

Main address

333 Seventh Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10001 USA

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EIN

23-7378153

NTEE code info

Women's Rights (R24)

Reproductive Rights (R61)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

IWHC was founded in 1984 by Joan Dunlop with the recognition that women’s and girls’ human rights, health, and equality are essential to social, environmental, and economic justice for all. While public attention to the health and economic empowerment of women and girls is at an all-time high, attacks on the rights of women and girls have continued unabated in many places around the world, and funding for women’s rights groups is decreasing. In this difficult context, IWHC’s support for women’s groups, and focus on policy advocacy, are more important than ever. IWHC ensures that women’s voices are heard by providing financial and technical support to local feminist organizations that undertake advocacy for law and policy change; and by leading its own direct, high-impact advocacy to shape global norms and policies on sexual and reproductive health and rights. The evidence is clear that strong women’s movements are critical to progress on gender equality and women’s human rights.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Grantmaking

IWHC’s grantmaking invests in feminist organizations over the long-term, supporting leaders who are advancing women's sexual and reproductive health and rights in more than 40 countries across Africa, Asia,
Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Population(s) Served

IWHC's policy and advocacy expertise, honed over three decades of activism, continues to deliver hard-won gains at the UN, with the United States government, and
elsewhere that reflect the priorities of women and girls worldwide. IWHC does not shy away from so-called “controversial” issues such as safe abortion or the right of
adolescent girls to information about their bodies.

Population(s) Served

IWHC strengthens women’s movements by supporting women and young people with advocacy tools and training. IWHC ensures that these movements are sustainable, and that feminist leaders can build on progress, by capturing lessons learned, generating new ideas, and reframing debates.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

IWHC’s vision is a just and sustainable world where all people, regardless of gender, enjoy their human rights and health, and have power over their lives. In order to achieve gender justice, IWHC advances the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and adolescent girls through concrete organizational goals:

Goal 1: Feminist movements are resourced, intersectional, and powerful; have leadership that is diverse and inclusive; and work in cross-movement coalitions

Goal 2: The development of norms, laws, policies, and discourses that advance abortion as a human right

Goal 3: The development of norms, laws, policies, and discourses that advance the right of women, girls, and marginalized people to celebrate and make decisions about their sexuality and reproduction

Goal 4: Ensure IWHC has the profile, agility, coordination, and values alignment to lead the fight for gender justice worldwide

IWHC conducts its work through three main approaches. First, the organization provides grants, technical assistance, and mentorship to women leaders and women’s rights organizations in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East that are working to advance women’s and girls’ health and rights at local and regional levels. Second, at the international level, IWHC brings pioneering ideas, evidence, and expertise to the forefront of multilateral negotiations on women’s rights and health, playing an active role in New York City at the United Nations headquarters, and in Washington, DC. Third, IWHC amplifies the voices of its partners and documents lessons from its work, and from across the women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights movement. By working closely with women’s organizations around the world, IWHC gains the perspectives of women on the ground and helps make their voices heard in the halls of power at global-level policy negotiations.

IWHC’s model of feminist organizing, financial and technical support, and direct advocacy are well suited to respond to the challenges that women and girls face today in achieving gender equality. Autocrats around the world have accelerated their crackdown on civil society groups, and the closing space spells disaster for women and girls globally. In this context, IWHC brings:

A flexible funding model and commitment to trust-based grantmaking, which allows the organization to strengthen women-led movements, and fund in countries where civil society repression is widespread.

A long track record in advocacy that informs a belief in the triumph of movements under threat. IWHC’s history and expertise in the women’s movement—including its role at ICPD and the Fourth World Conference on Women, as well as during the recent negotiations of the SDGs—reinforce its understanding of the importance and value of hard-won international norms and standards. IWHC has access to influential leaders who seek out the organization for its advice and counsel, and is able to directly impact the positions taken by countries in global negotiation spaces.

Legitimacy as an advocate, both in the US and at the UN, because of its grantmaking experiences, including decades-long grantmaking and relationships with partners in key countries such as Brazil and Nigeria, and because of its research and learnings from the global movement. IWHC learns from its partners that have long operated in repressive and authoritarian countries, and this experience informs its outlook and work.

A commitment to feminist knowledge generation and research on critical and emergent SRHR themes, such as the Global Gag Rule, and provider refusals to provide abortion services. This research is grounded in its grantees’ expertise and experiences, and serves to inform the field and drive advocacy. IWHC creates spaces where activists across the SRHR movement can safely explore ideas, test their knowledge, and shape new frameworks and strategies for advocacy.

The ability to make and support connections between activists and policy makers in global spaces. This helps combat “closing spaces,” and protects civil society organizations and individual activists.

An understanding of SRHR through the lens of interconnected struggles across the globe. IWHC’s global reach and intersectional approach are powerful, and prioritize historically marginalized communities. IWHC plays a key role in bridging and connecting movements through knowledge building and convening opportunities and by connecting activists facing similar challenges.

For over 35 years, IWHC has sustained and strengthened women’s movements—specifically the movement for SRHR, a dynamic part of global feminist organizing. To fully achieve their human rights, women and girls must be able to exercise their right to control their bodies, fertility, and sexuality. IWHC has:

• Provided $35 million in funding to 220 local women’s organizations and 630 feminist activists across Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.
• Trained more than 250 young women across 54 countries since 2007 through its Advocacy in Practice program.
• Played a key role in negotiating the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals, ensuring a focus on gender equality throughout the goals.

Given the need for investment in global women’s rights organizations, and the importance of policy advocacy toward advancing gender equality, IWHC aspires to increase significantly its support to the women’s movement in the global South, as well as grow its own advocacy for sexual and reproductive health and rights over the coming five years.

Financials

International Women's Health Coalition
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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International Women's Health Coalition

Board of directors
as of 8/25/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Kathleen Regan

The Commonwealth Fund

Term: 2019 -

Debra Diniz

Co-Founder, ANIS: Institute of Bioethics, Human Rights and Gender, and Professor, University of Brasilia, Brazil

Susan Nitze

President Emerita, Girl Scout Council of Greater New York

Marnie Pillsbury

Philanthropic Advisor

John Craig

Former Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Commonwealth Fund

Catherine Gellert

Partner, Windcrest Partners

Brian Brink

Former Chief Medical Officer, Anglo American plc, South Africa

Stuart Burden

Vice President, Silicon Valley Community Fund

Alexander Farman-Farmaian

Partner, Vice Chairman, and Portfolio Manager, Edgewood Management LLC

Françoise Girard

President, International Women's Health Coalition

Christine Grumm

Chris Grumm Consulting Group

Matthew Hurd

Partner, Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

Sandra Lawson

Managing Director, Goldman Sachs

Sisonke Msimang

Writer and Activist, Columnist for the Daily Maverick, South Africa and Australia

Aryeh Neier

President Emeritus, Open Society Foundations

Diana Taylor

Vice Chair, Solera Capital LLC

George Biddle

Chairman of World Connect

Helena Choi

Former Program Officer in the Global Development and Population Program, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Kirtna Pai

Co-Founder, Opis Partners

Kathleen Regan

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Commonwealth Fund

Sarah Billinghurst Solomon

Former Assistant General Manager, Artistic, Metropolitan Opera

Fadekemi Akinfaderin

Senior Program Officer, Prospera

Michi Jigarjian

President, Baxter St at CCNY

Jameela Pedicini

Executive Director, Climate Finance Initiatives at Bloomberg LP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No