Samaritan House

Fighting Poverty. Lifting Lives.

San Mateo, CA   |  www.samaritanhousesanmateo.org

Mission

Fighting Poverty. Lifting Lives. We mobilize the resources of our community to help those among us who are in need. Our dedicated professional staff and volunteers work together to provide food, access to shelter, healthcare, and a broad range of supportive services. We preserve dignity, promote self-sufficiency, and provide hope.

Ruling year info

1975

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Bart Charlow

Main address

4031 Pacific Boulevard Third Floor

San Mateo, CA 94403 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7416272

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Health - General and Rehabilitative N.E.C. (E99)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We ensure that the working poor aren't invisible, and provide the resources and support they need to be fed, clothed, healthy, and housed so they can remain an active, successful part of our community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Client Services

Samaritan House’s Client Services Program delivers essential safety net services designed to keep San Mateo County residents in their homes and serves as the gateway to all other services provided by the agency. The primary goal of the program is to help low-income San Mateo County residents increase their level of stability and self-sufficiency, thereby helping to prevent homelessness. Samaritan House helps these residents meet their basic needs through case managers who provide individualized and comprehensive evaluation, case management, education, and referrals to enriching programs at Samaritan House and other agencies in the community. Each month, case workers provide individual counseling in person and by telephone, provide referrals for other services in the County, and function as client advocates.

Case Management: After evaluating a client's needs, the case manager develops a plan to help each client increase their self-sufficiency through Samaritan House's resources and, as needed, referrals to other agencies in the community. In addition, a San Mateo County Benefits Analyst is housed on-site at Samaritan House and coordinates her work directly with Samaritan House's case managers to help clients enroll in government benefit programs in a timely fashion.

Emergency Assistance: Samaritan House helps families experiencing a one-time crisis by providing financial grants that help pay for rent or other critical bills. Samaritan House is able to disburse emergency funds through the San Francisco Chronicle's Season of Sharing (of which Samaritan House acts as a fiscal sponsor for 7 core agencies in San Mateo County), Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) funds, Measure A, HIF, and other emergency funds. Rental assistance is one of the greatest financial needs and is provided to prevent clients from being evicted from their homes. All assistance checks are written directly to landlords or other vendors. As deemed necessary by the case managers, clients are strongly encouraged to attend financial empowerment classes facilitated by Samaritan House to decrease their chances of needing such assistance in the future.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Samaritan House is expanding its financial education and asset development services for low-income clients. In collaboration with our partners, United Way of the Bay Area’s Earn It! Keep It! Save It! Program, Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center and Opportunity Fund, financial empowerment services deliver a multi-pronged approach to asset building for clients at varying stages. Although many clients access public benefits such as subsidized food, child care and programs designed as emergency assistance, many earn "too high” of an income to qualify for public assistance and earn "too little” to cover many of the "emergency” costs out of pocket, such as car repair, medical emergencies or sudden loss of income. They are asset poor, meaning they lack savings or reserves to cover at least three months of living expenses, and cannot afford these emergency costs out of pocket. Consequently, many fall behind in payments and suffer credit blemishes that ultimately impact their ability to be self-sustaining.

Financial empowerment services provide language appropriate, easily accessible financial education that includes tangible incentives to encourage families to build and preserve their assets, access to affordable financial products and services, and financial counseling and coaching aimed at increasing income, building savings, and gaining and sustaining assets so that asset-poor individuals can move along a path towards greater economic security.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Samaritan House Food & Nutrition Program produces meals each month for low-income residents of San Mateo County. These meals are distributed through a variety of channels to ensure the program meets the diverse needs of the community through whatever means are most relevant to the client, including:

• Samaritan House’s Dining Hall: Open for dinner Monday through Friday every week. Families come to the Dining Hall and either eat at the Dining Hall or take meals boxed up "to-go” if they wish to eat in the privacy of their own home.
• Food Pantry: Thousands benefit from non-perishable items
• Meals for the Homeless: Homeless persons staying at our Safe Harbor Shelter receive daily meals through our Food and Nutrition Program.
• Holiday Food and Nutrition Program: During the holidays we serve a large number of individuals and families.
• Meals for the Community: Samaritan House prepares meals daily for programs at other agencies serving low-income persons throughout San Mateo County, as requested.
• Family Harvest and Produce Mobile: We partner with Second Harvest Food Bank to provide groceries and fresh produce through the Family Harvest and Produce Mobile programs.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Samaritan House’s Shelter Services program is an integral component of San Mateo County’s housing crisis resolution system that provides emergency and inclement weather housing for unhoused adults, 18+ years. Our program tripled during the pandemic, with the expansion of Safe Harbor Shelter and the opening of Pacific Emergency Shelter and El Camino House. Services include safety, warmth, nutrition, on-site case management and housing location services, counseling, medical, dental, and behavioral health care, educational programming, access to benefits and other supportive services. Samaritan House collaborates with emergency shelter providers, essential services providers, homelessness prevention and and rapid re-housing assistance providers, homeless assistance providers, and mainstream service/housing providers. We are committed to the success of all shelter residents and provide the critical support needed to achieve housing stability and long-term independence post COVID-19.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

Samaritan House Free Clinics provide— at no charge—primary, preventive, and specialty healthcare services for low-income uninsured residents of the Sequoia and Peninsula Healthcare Districts. Activities include providing primary care medical services, dentistry and some specialty services such as diabetic care, gynecology, dermatology, internal medicine, neurology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, optometry, podiatry and nutritional counseling. The clinics have more than 100 volunteer health professionals, including dentists, doctors, nurses and others. These volunteers enable the Clinics to cost effectively deliver high quality care. Patients who require specialty care not offered at the clinics are referred to other health providers in the community who generously volunteer their services. In addition, clients are referred to San Mateo Access and Care for Everyone (ACE) Program, a county-sponsored program that provides health care coverage for low-income adult residents of the County. Our clinics are open Monday through Friday and some evening hours. Last year the clinics provided over 9,000 patient visits.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Worker Resource Center provides an alternative location for temporary laborers and potential employers to meet for work. Managed by Samaritan House and funded by the City of San Mateo, the Worker Resource Center opened in 2003 with the goal of providing a safe place for employers and employees to meet.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people

The Kids’ Closet is Samaritan House’s clothing center where families can shop for their children for free. Families who are registered with Samaritan House can obtain a monthly clothing voucher from the client services department. We serve about 1,700 children per year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The holiday assistance program provides 5,000 low-income clients (including more than 1,800 children and hundreds of seniors) with food bags and toys during the holiday season. With the help of our volunteers and donors, Samaritan House was able to help over 1,035 families have a brighter holiday season! Some highlights from the holiday program this past year include:

Food Distribution: special food distributions during November and December provided groceries – like fresh fruits and vegetables, canned goods, hams and turkeys – to 3,894 individuals in need.

Toy Shoppe: 1,422 children picked out stuffed animals, games, educational toys, and books that were donated from groups, service clubs, and individual donors from around the community.

Family Sharing Program: 110 family sharing program donors – including individuals, families, church and civic groups, businesses, scout and after school programs – provided food and gifts for 193 families and seniors.

The Holiday Program is made possible through many generous donors in our community and the 1,179 volunteers who came together to distribute toys and food to our clients.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

4-Star Rated Charity 2022

Charity Navigator

Community Health Champions 2021

Peninsula Health Care District

Partner impact!AWARD 2021

Foster City Chamber of Commerce

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Shelter Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of patient visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Free Medical and Dental Clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food & Nutrition Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At Samaritan House, we believe in a community of hope through neighbor helping neighbor. Our mission is to mobilize the resources of our community to help those among us who are in need. Our dedicated professional staff and volunteers work together to provide food, access to shelter, healthcare, and a broad range of supportive services. We preserve dignity, promote self sufficiency, and provide hope. Our goal is to meet the essential daily needs of low-income San Mateo County residents each year in order to relieve suffering caused by hunger, homelessness and lack of access to basic necessities, including healthcare services.

Samaritan House serves individuals and families who earn less than 30% of the Area Median Income (AMI), which is $35,150 for a family of 4 in San Mateo County (HUD, State of CA HCD, San Mateo County 2015). The majority of Samaritan House clients are low-income residents in need who reside in central San Mateo County (i.e., Millbrae through San Carlos). Approximately 12,147 individuals are served by Samaritan House on an annual basis.

San Mateo County's reputation as a wealthy community obscures the pockets of extreme poverty within its borders. This large income disparity can cause unequal access to education, health care, and other resources. People living in poverty are often unable to meet their nutritional, health care and educational needs, and are more likely to face more substantial health problems than the more affluent. Children are especially vulnerable.

In 2010, Samaritan House adopted a five year strategic plan. Priorities included: 1) completion of the Capital Campaign; 2) identifying and serving clients who are ready to transition to self sufficiency; 3) implementing a meaningful and comprehensive client data system; 4) developing an emergency-succession plan and evaluating the organization's organizational structure; 5) evaluating community needs and opportunities for potential alliances and new program initiatives; and 6) increasing the visibility of Samaritan House throughout the community.

2014-15 is the fifth year of our 5 year strategic plan, and we have made considerable progress towards meeting the goals outlined in our strategic plan. 1) With the completion of the capital campaign, we have been able to pay down the mortgage for the building as planned for the expenses of the agency's headquarters. 2) We are continuing to provide safety net services for low-income families in San Mateo County. 3) We are implementing Clarity Human Services Software for our comprehensive client database and are building our system for data collection, management, analysis and reporting to support improved program management and evaluation. 4) We completed an organizational assessment With CompassPoint Nonprofit Services in conjunction with the Board of Directors. 5) We evaluated gaps in community services and created new program initiatives in conjunction with key community partners, including the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Programwith InnVision Shelter Network and our new Financial Empowerment Program. We have assumed the programmatic responsibilities for the County Community Action Agency and have been distributing County Measure A and CSBG funds through the Core Service Agency Network. 6) And we have increased the visibility of the agency through the launch of a new agency website, an increased social media presence, and our first formal annual report to highlight the agency's services in the community.

Samaritan House has an organizational budget of $13,078,471 and the highest Charity Navigator rating of four stars. The Samaritan House Board of Directors, lead by Board President William Freeman, uses a committee structure to govern the organization. The operational and fiscal health of the agency is strong. And we have deeply committed and talented staff members who work together to promote our agency mission.

Samaritan House has over two decades of experience administering and managing progressively larger state and federally funded programs as a single contractor, fiscal agent, and lead agency for multiple-agency collaborators. Samaritan House currently provides contractual administration and oversight of grant funding from over 50 private foundations and corporations on an annual basis.

Samaritan House's effectiveness comes from leveraging significant in-kind community resources within its programs. Volunteer medical and clinical staff, interpreter services, administrative work, and local hospital contributions of lab and x-ray services are integral to operations. Approximately 3,200 volunteers each year volunteer their time, talent and energy for the benefit of our daily program operations. In addition, we receive $4.4 million in in-kind labor, services, facility use, food, transportation passes and clothing for the benefit of our clients, which constitute 35% of our annual budget.

For over 20 years, the agency has been the fiscal sponsor and lead core agency for the County's Season of Sharing Fund that provides emergency housing and critical needs assistance to eligible clients. Samaritan House has been instrumental in bringing in $2.5 million in homelessness prevention resources, which have been distributed amongst 12 agencies throughout the County through the Core Service Network and other partner agencies. Samaritan House serves as the fiscal sponsor for State Community Service Block Grant (CSBG) funds, a federally funded antipoverty program that we administer with our core partner agencies. We collaborate with InnVision Shelter Network to provide homelessness prevention services for veterans and their families. And we lead anti-poverty efforts in the County through oversight of the program services of the Community Action Agency of San Mateo County.

More recently, Samaritan House has been the recipient of County Measure A funding that provides homelessness prevention assistance services for households at-risk of homelessness and County CSBG funding to provide rapid rehousing services for homeless individuals and families. Samaritan House is proud to continue its leadership role in strengthening the social safety-net and building partnerships with government, the private sector, and community agencies in the nonprofit sector for the collective benefit of our neighbors in need.

To better inform the management and evaluation of our programs and to meet the internal and external demands of assessment and performance measures, Samaritan House is currently implementing a comprehensive client database as we build our system for data collection, management, analysis and reporting. The ability to analyze our client data and to verify and measure the effectiveness of our program services will help us as an organization make better-informed policy and practice decisions, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes for the families we serve.

As we continue to refine our agencies goals, strategies and objectives, we recognize that our region's current economic prosperity is not broadly shared, leaving more and more families, even entire communities, to fall further behind with diminishing prospects for catching up. Our community's most vulnerable residents are more reliant than ever before on the social services sector for their basic survival. To meet this need, Samaritan House has emerged as a leader in San Mateo County's anti-poverty efforts and continues to expand its leadership role.

Together with the Core Service Agency Network, we are improving the conditions of poverty, by advancing the self-sufficiency of homeless and low-income individuals and families in San Mateo County. Samaritan House is proud to continue its leadership role in strengthening the social safety-net and building partnerships with government, the private sector, and community agencies in the nonprofit sector for the collective benefit of our neighbors in need.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    COVID peeled back the layers of socioeconomic inequality and accelerated an already widening wealth disparity in our own backyard, with greater divides separating those at the economic top from the bottom. We are never going back to pre-pandemic levels of service. Too many have fallen further into poverty with depleted savings, uncertain rental situations, rent/mortgage debt, shuttered businesses, and lost work. Low-income families, especially those with children, single-parent households, seniors, and those at-risk of homelessness will continue to need our help for some time, and Samaritan House will be with them every step of the way.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The Learning Center at Safe Harbor Shelter was designed and paid for through our fundraising efforts as a result of clients voicing a need for computers. Rather than making a trip to the library, residents requested a space on-site and the tools with which to put together their resumes, search for housing and employment. Another such example made in response to feedback by a group of our clients was regarding the lack of allowable space for folks to gather and discuss culture and religion. As a result, staff developed a schedule for the Learning Center at Safe Harbor to be used for these purposes.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Samaritan House has a rich history of hiring clients with lived experience who are both from our existing programs or other programs in the broader community. We know through experience that different ideas, perspectives, and backgrounds create a stronger community. We commit to aligning our culture and service practices to further be a beacon of diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging. As such, Samaritan House is forming a client advisory group consisting of members with current or past experience of homelessness, including staff who were once clients, who can provide invaluable feedback on the systems they have personally navigated. Members will use this platform to learn about and evaluate the system of care and to make recommendations for improvement.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Samaritan House
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Samaritan House

Board of directors
as of 10/05/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Davina Hurt

Attorney, City Councilwoman, Humanitarian Rights Advocate (Belmont, CA)

Jason Ting

The Ting Group

Ravi Sinha

Cornerstone Research

Cliff Robbins

GCA Law Partners LLP

Sue Ringeon

Nuveen

Maria Nadel

San Mateo Foster City School District

Susan Ketcham

Davina Hurt

Attorney, City Councilwoman, Humanitarian Rights Advocate

Ron Granville

Woodmont Real Estate Services

Mike Aydelott

Duncan Beardsley

Generosity in Action

Tish Busselle

Marie Chuang

Hillsborough Councilmember

Nicole Fernandez

Valentina Helo-Villegas

The Primary School

Michael Jackson

Docusign

Lisa Toyama Jarboe

Bank of America

Jeff Lucchesi

Pamela McCarthy-Hudson

Massy Safai

Margaret Taylor

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/23/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.