Community Assistance Council

Kansas City, MO   |  www.cackc.org

Mission

Community Assistance Council empowers individuals and families to achieve self-sufficiency through the delivery of direct emergency assistance, education and advocacy.

Ruling year info

1983

Principal Officer

Rachel V. Casey

Main address

10901 Blue Ridge Boulevard

Kansas City, MO 64134 USA

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EIN

23-7439079

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Raising & Fund Distribution (Lun)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Homeless Prevention / Emergency Assistance

This program is targeted to prevent homelessness by assisting families with critical emergency services to help them stabilize their living situation. These services include:Housing assistance - rent and utility assistanceTemporary emergency housing (one week)Emergency medical assistance through a partnership with Kansas City's Medicine CabinetFood pantry servicesClothes closet - particularly for school or employmentEducational classes targeting basic life skills

Population(s) Served

Supportive services are provided to older adults to help them stay in their home and community.  These services include:  Emergency medical assistance such as prescriptions, durable medical supplies, emergency dental care and diabetic supplies.Food pantry and clothes closet services.Other resources and referrals.

Population(s) Served

These programs provide emergency services and other support for economically challenged residents in south Kansas City, MO, particularly rent and utilities assistance, and resources and referrals to help clients work overcome barriers and work toward self sufficiency.CAC is a key partner in Impact Hickman Mills and Impact Center school districts programs to reduced student homelessness.CAC was the nonprofit partner that facilitated the mobile food pantry coming to Ruskin High School in Hickman Mills.Developing a series of classes on a variety of subjects to be available to clients and to the community in general. These classes can include topics such as budgeting, low-cost nutritious meal preparation, job search, etc.We have computers available for area residents to use for resume preparation, on line applications and job search.We have volunteer opportunities, including community service opportunities (school or court-ordered) for residents to serve in their community.

Population(s) Served

CAC’s programs primarily address immediate, emergency needs. However, CAC intends to be more proactive and comprehensive in assessing the needs of clients and helping provide the information that can help clients access other services and overcome barriers. For example, CAC can help clients get a driver’s license or ID, or access and fill out a SNAP or Medicaid form, or find transitional housing, or connect with health services. While CAC cannot provide long-term intensive services in a lot of areas, CAC can help clients find and follow up on resources that can help them overcome barriers on the path toward self sufficiency.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With a mission of "Empowering individuals and families to self-sufficiency through the delivery of direct emergency assistance, education and advocacy since 1976," CAC seeks to increase the number of clients served with our 14 different emergency assistance, services including food, rent, utilities, temporary lodging, clothing, computer access (for job applications), holiday meals, holiday store, diapers and pullups, medicines and medical assistance, and more. Moving forward CAC intends to increase the number of clients provided with resources and referrals for services CAC does not provide directly, such as long-term shelter, health services, mental health assessments, food stamps, legal aid, and much more. CAC's immediate services along with resources and referrals provided would combine to address acute and long-term barriers that may keep them from self-sufficiency. Data captured in MAACLink will tell us how many receive our immediate services and how many are referred to other agencies or resources. CAC intends to examine that data, as well as call previous emergency utilities or rent assistance clients to see if the assistance helped them become more stable.

CAC is working toward updating our intake and assessment process to be able to serve more clients with immediate resources (such as emergency food, utility payments or temporary lodging), while also assessing what resources we can help them access (such as getting a driver’s license ID or birth certificate) and what information we can provide to them (such as a SNAP application, referral to a shelter or legal aid). In addition to streamlining our own process for immediate services, we intend to become more knowledgeable and responsive with services available from other agencies. We'll work with other nonprofit and government organizations to ensure we have the latest information on their scope of services, client qualifications and capabilities. We have a focus now on finding a way to "say yes", helping each client who comes in our door to walk away with not only their initial need met, but possibly multiple needs, and to use creative ideas to reach audiences. For instance, we have plans to have senior BINGO afternoons where we invite seniors to come in to play, but in the middle take a break to learn about a particular relevant subject such as Medicare supplemental insurance, home safety or elder legal issues. We have become a Harvesters Healthy Pantry Partner, providing choice shopping for clients resulting in happier clients and less food waste and returns. CAC has also extended the food pantry to five days a week and the clothing closet and diapers are now available for clients five days a week. We recognize there are more than enough extremely low-income families who truly need the emergency food, rent and utilities assistance. After going through some staffing transitions, CAC now has two full-time and three part-time staff, plus contract accounting services. We are increasing our volunteer numbers and capabilities by actively recruiting in the community. We have an energized board and committees with a proactive approach to grantwriting, fundraising and community outreach, as well as building more efficient and effective program coordination. With the increase of funds, volunteers and efficiencies we intend to significantly increase the number of clients we are able to serve with emergency services, as well as resources and referrals to overcome barriers to self-sufficiency.

A mostly new board has committed to program assessment and staff rebuilding to maximize our impact and client reach in the community. Current staff have years of experience in food pantry management, social services, community engagement, fundraising, grantwriting, nonprofit administration and accounting. This team is committed to creating efficiencies, finding new resources, engaging community partners and recruiting and training additional volunteers to significantly increase our capabilities. CAC is developing a very proactive and creative development calendar with a particular focus on new large businesses in our large service area who have yet been supporting CAC.

CAC increased the number of clients served in every area except the clothing closet from 2017 to 2018, with especially significant increases in rent and utilities assistance, food pantry, Kansas City Medicine Cabinet and Happy Bottoms diapers. CAC upgraded our pantry with new glass-fronted chillers and large capacity freezer (H&R Block grant) to accommodate our increase in food intake and distribution and becoming a client-choice Harvesters Health Pantry Partner. CAC representation and engagement in community activities, such as resource fairs, Chamber and South Kansas City Alliance fairs, and more, has increased. After some staffing transitions, CAC now has a dedicated staff focused on improving effectiveness and efficiency of services. CAC has caught up on all financial and grant reporting and has processes in place to streamline processes. Successful grants written and received have increased, but this area still has much room to grow to meet needs, especially for rent and utilities assistance, for families in our service area. CAC needs to improve media, social media and printed marketing communications to increase awareness of our role and services in the South Kansas City community. There is room to increase our targeted audience outreach, in areas such as BINGO afternoons for seniors that include a mini program or information especially helpful to them. Significantly CAC is looking at implementing a more streamlined client intake and assessment process that identifies client needs beyond their initial reason for coming in to CAC. Clients may come in for the food pantry or rent, but the assessment can help us identify if they would also need a Kansas City Medicine Cabinet voucher for glasses or help with a SNAP application, for example. Or CAC could refer a client to Swope Health Services for medical needs Hillcrest Transitional Housing for longer-term needs, as examples.

Financials

Community Assistance Council
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Community Assistance Council

Board of directors
as of 5/10/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. John Sharp

Retired City Councilman

Term: 2018 - 2019

Zangi Miti

UMKC

Bill Humenczuk

John Sharp

Retired City Councilman

David McDaniel

Holmeswood Baptist Church

Rodney Bland

McDaniel Hazley Group

DaRon McGee

Missouri House of Representatives

Martina Peterson

16th Circuit Court of Jackson County

Steve Williams

St. Luke's United Methodist Church

Ronna Holloman-Hughes

Federal Public Defenders, Western Mo. District

Anna Marie Merritt

Shook Hardy & Bacon

Teresa Tanner

Hickman Mills School District

Cassandra Wainwright

Heaven Sent Outreach Ministries

Madeleine Cardarella

Federal Public Defenders, Western Mo. District

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes