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CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS, INC.

Educating Children to Succeed

Erie, PA   |  www.cdcenters.org

Mission

The mission of Child Development Centers, Inc. (CDC) is "Educating Children to Succeed." Our organization provides child care and early childhood education for about 1,900 infants, toddlers, preschoolers and elementary school-age children at 20 sites in Venango, Crawford and Erie counties in northwestern Pennsylvania. In keeping with our educational mission, CDC has a full spectrum of accreditations and other marks of excellence that distinguish our services. Most of our centers have Star 4 ratings from Pennsylvania's Keystone STARS child care and early childhood educational quality improvement initiative -- the highest grade that Keystone STARS gives -- and 5 are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

Ruling year info

1970

Chief Executive Officer

Rina M. Irwin

Main address

213 East 41st Street

Erie, PA 16504 USA

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Formerly known as

Day Care Services, Inc.

EIN

25-1198158

NTEE code info

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Child Day Care (P33)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Child Development Centers, Inc. aims to provide child care and early childhood education to families in Venango, Crawford and Erie counties, especially those with low income that could otherwise not afford child care. CDC serves children from infancy through sixth grade and offers supplemental services to support children’s growth and development.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Infants and Toddlers

Our infant-toddler classrooms provide individualized care and early childhood development for children beginning at 6 weeks of age.

Children’s emotions in early childhood programs are related to their interactions with their primary caregivers. In our infant and toddler classrooms, a primary caregiver is assigned to each child which provides responsive care that meets the individual needs of the children. The primary caregiver uses nurturing routines of the day (diaper changing, eating and mealtime, hellos and goodbyes, sleeping) to develop and maintain a trusting relationship with each child.

Our teachers use The Creative Curriculum to guide the children's daily learning experiences. The curriculum contains 21 early learning objectives that are subdivided into four content areas including learning about self and others, movement, the world and communicating.

Population(s) Served
Children
Infants and toddlers
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

Head Start is the federal governments preschool program for 3-, 4- and 5-year-old children from low-income households. Head Start at CDC is a full-day, 10-month program that is intended to prepare children for a successful transition to kindergarten, elementary school and beyond.

All Head Start classes use Creative Curriculum that contains early learning objectives that are subdivided into 10 categories including sense of self, responsibility for self and others, pro-social behavior, large motor skills, small motor skills, learning and problem-solving, mathematics, representation and symbolic thinking, listening and speaking, and reading and writing.

Head Start offers a number of other services that supports the childrens health, development and family well-being.

A family's income must be at or below the federal poverty level, currently $31,200 for a family of four, for children to enroll in Head Start. The program is free to income-eligible households.

Population(s) Served
Children
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

Pennsylvania Pre-K Counts is a state-funded pre-kindergarten learning program that we offer at several locations in Erie, Crawford and Venango Counties. This full-day, 9-month program for 3-, 4- and 5-year-old learners is intended to give them an early educational boost that will help them to make a successful transition to kindergarten and to do better in school.

Each Pre-K Counts class uses Creative Curriculum that contains early learning objectives that are subdivided into 10 categories including sense of self, responsibility for self and others, pro-social behavior, large motor skills, small motor skills, learning and problem-solving, mathematics, representation and symbolic thinking, listening and speaking, and reading and writing.

Grant funding covers all costs of Pre-K Counts for children from income-eligible households.

Population(s) Served
Children
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

CDC also offers a Private Preschool program for 3-, 4- and 5-year-old boys and girls that is identical to Head Start and Pre-K Counts but has no income eligibility guidelines.

This full-day, 9-month program for 3-, 4- and 5-year-old boys and girls is intended to give them an early educational boost that will help them to make a successful transition to kindergarten and beyond and to do better in school.

Like Head Start and Pre-K Counts, CDC's Preschool classes utilize Creative Curriculum that contains early learning objectives that are subdivided into 10 categories including sense of self, responsibility for self and others, pro-social behavior, large motor skills, small motor skills, learning and problem-solving, mathematics, representation and symbolic thinking, listening and speaking and reading and writing.

Population(s) Served
Children
Families
Parents

CDC provides before- and after-school care for children from kindergarten through sixth grade. The school-age program offers a safe, comfortable and educational environment that blends play and learning.

CDC balances education and fun with interesting science experiments, math challenges, art creations and other fun activities. From Lego STEM Robots to puzzles to dress-up to Magna Tiles, kids can choose from a wide variety of stimulating and engaging activities during free play time. We also offer homework help, a nutritious snack and physical activities.

Population(s) Served
Children
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

The Early Learning Resource Center (ELRC) helps families who are income-eligible to find and pay for child care and early childhood education so the parents can work, complete job training, attend school, etc.

For more information about ELRC, please contact Pam Sampsell at (814) 518-5226 or [email protected].

Population(s) Served
Children
Infants and toddlers
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

Camp Funshine is CDC's all day, 11-week summer program that is intended to provide a safe, fun, educational experience for elementary school-age children. CDC offers Camp Funshine at its Franklin School-Age, Hasson Heights and Cranberry centers in Venango County, PA.

At Camp Funshine, children engage in math, science and literacy games and activities, experience the arts, go swimming, compete in Camp Olympics, showcase their skills in a talent show and much more! We also go on numerous field trips to Two Mile Run Park, Morrison Park and other local and regional destinations.

Enroll your child for Camp Funshine, find out about enrollment/field trip fees or learn more by calling CDC at (814) 670-0838. Financial assistance for income-eligible families may be available through the Early Learning Resource Center (ELRC) at (814) 518-5226.

Population(s) Served
Children
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

Outer Limits is a free program for children ages 8-17 in Venango County that provide opportunities to participate in skill building activities. Children may choose from a variety of activities that community organizations or local school districts offer, including piano, horseback riding, football, soccer, swimming, art, wrestling, basketball, baseball and cheerleading.

Children who are eligible for Outer Limits include those:

• who are being raised by a single parent, foster family or other relative
• whose families receive food stamps, cash assistance or SSI
• who are experiencing academic or social difficulties in school
• who have disabilities or who reside with a parent who is disabled
• who attend school at home
• whose families are experiencing a lack of employment
• whose families have exceptionally low income
• whose families experience other disadvantages.

To learn more about Outer Limits, please contact Tammy Snyder at (814) 670-0838 or email at [email protected].

Population(s) Served
Children
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Child Development Centers, Inc. aims works to promote student achievement and have every child enter kindergarten with the school district’s expectations for entry. Test scores will demonstrate that the children who attend CDC are above their peers in kindergarten in all areas of expectations. In addition, CDC looks to have all employees be engaged in the mission of “Educating Children To Succeed,” outperform the expectations of funders and customers, maintain a high quality of life within all centers and to operate profitably.

Child Development Centers, Inc. hires highly-qualified staff and continues to train staff at all levels of the organization to support their professional development. They are educated on CDC’s curriculum and best practices to execute their responsibilities accordingly.

Child Development Centers, Inc. has 400 qualified employees, 16 high-quality facilities and a strong organizational/financial structure.

Child Development Centers, Inc. has been working with families for more than 50 years in northwestern Pennsylvania and is currently serving nearly 2,000 children. CDC has also acquired several state and federal grants, including Early Head Start, Head Start and Pre-K Counts. Moving forward, CDC would like to continue serving children at a high level while being more intentional in data collection.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS, INC.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS, INC.

Board of directors
as of 02/28/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Denise Jones

Retired

Denise Jones

Retired

Mary Ann Graham

Retired

Rina Irwin

Child Development Centers, Inc.

Elliot Ehrenreich

Phillips Lytle, LLP

Tesha Nesbit

North American Partners in Anesthesia

Michelle Fiorelli

Erie's Public Schools

Robin Howell

PennWest University

Eugene Thomas

Franklin Area School District

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/28/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/28/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.