PLATINUM2021

Westmoreland County Food Bank

Ending Hunger Here at Home

aka Westmoreland Food Bank   |   Delmont, PA   |  www.westmorelandfoodbank.org

Mission

Our Mission is to enable all Westmoreland County residents who are hungry or at risk of hunger to have ready access to food.

Ruling year info

1982

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Jennifer Miller

Main address

100 Devonshire Dr.

Delmont, PA 15626 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

25-1422682

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The ultimate goal of the agency is to eliminate hunger among vulnerable persons in the county. However, there is a great deal that must still be done to increase access and awareness for charitable food and non-food assistance programs in order to eliminate or reduce this problem altogether. For this reason, the work of the Westmoreland County Food Bank continues to be so crucial. The Food Pantry Distribution Program is the most basic charitable food offering of the Westmoreland Food Bank. This program employs the support of 44 partner agencies that operate pantry sites geographically dispersed and conveniently located where the need exists. The program distributes aid on a monthly basis to food insecure individuals and families all of ages and backgrounds with a household income at or below 150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. Many other programs addressing the needs of children and seniors are in place including the summer food, backpack, and senior food box programs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Pantry Distribution Program

The core of Westmoreland Food Bank’s work is to acquire food and household necessities and to distribute it to needy people throughout Westmoreland County through a network of member agencies comprised primarily of volunteer-run, faith-based organizations. While a number of our member agencies are soup kitchens and other on-site feeding programs, the majority of our member agencies are emergency food pantries that make up our Food Pantry Distribution Program.

Each month, we deliver food and household necessities to our network of 43 food pantries throughout Westmoreland County. The pantries then distribute the food to their income-eligible constituents. In order to meet income eligibility requirements, family income must be at or below 150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

For over thirty years, the Westmoreland Food Bank has sponsored the Summer Feeding Program. For eight weeks each summer, free breakfasts and lunches are served to disadvantaged children at approximately twenty sites around Westmoreland County.

While the Food Bank contracts with an outside food vendor to prepare and deliver the meals, we recruit, train and monitor site supervisors, order and track meals, track participants, insure compliance with food safety and food handling regulations, and perform other administrative duties such as budgeting and billing.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Pennsylvania Senior Food Program (PSFB) is federally funded through the state Department of Agriculture and provides supplemental, monthly food boxes specially designed to meet the nutritional needs of seniors.

Each month, 1,400 income eligible seniors age 60 and over receive senior boxes. In 2020, 493,007 pounds of nutritious food were distributed through this program. PSFB is a wonderful program that would not be successful without the help of volunteers who pack the boxes which are generously sponsored by Menasha.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Unfortunately, only two distributions were held in 2020 when the pandemic hit. At that time, we were unable to ensure the distributions could be held safely, with social distancing in place. We have revamped the program for 2021 and are excited to have it back up and running.

In 2019, over 656,000 pounds of additional food was provided to roughly 2,300 needy households through this program. 1,593 were children and 1,526 were seniors. Without GGFE, much of this nutritious food would be discarded due to lack of refrigeration capacity. Each week, groups and individuals sponsor GGFE distributions where an average of over 20,000 pounds of perishable food (frozen, dairy products, and fresh produce) is directly distributed to needy families by our staff and volunteers at sites throughout Westmoreland County. Sponsorship is $400.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Since relaunching the program in 2015, we have received support from PNC Charitable Trusts, Toyota of Greensburg, Dominion Foundation, Red Nose Day Fund in partnership with Feeding America, and the PA Association of School Retirees (Westmoreland Chapter). The Food Bank supplies weekend meal kits to 390 students from Derry Middle School, Grandview Elementary School in Derry, Monessen Elementary, Monessen Middle School, Ramsay Elementary in Mt. Pleasant, H.W. Good Elementary School in Herminie, Central Westmoreland Career & Technology Center in New Stanton, Marian Elementary School in Rostraver, and Head Start in Ruffs Dale. Recipients are identified by the schools and participants qualify based on their eligibility for the National School Lunch Program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is a federal program that provides a monthly benefit to enable low-income households to purchase the food they need to feed their families. SNAP is the federal government’s first line of defense against food insecurity in the United States.

The Food Bank helps to increase access to meals by assisting eligible individuals and families over the phone to complete applications for SNAP benefits. In 2020, we submitted 517 applications to the Westmoreland County Assistance Office.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Through a Gap Study conducted in 2007, it was determined that an additional 40,000 people qualified for Food Bank services but were not receiving them. An Expansion model was developed with an outreach action plan which includes various outreach activities. Outreach efforts are concentrated on a different area of the county each year, with a focus on finding new food, funds, and friends to assist win reaching the underserved while maintaining quality service for our current consumers. Many individuals and families may be eligible for help and not even know it.

In 2020 outreach efforts were conducted in the West Newton and surrounding areas where an additional 100 households were added to pantry rolls. The central area of Westmoreland County including Murrysville, Greensburg, Latrobe and Derry is the focus for outreach efforts in 2021.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

In our pursuit to end hunger here at home, the Westmoreland County Food Bank launched the Military Share Program in 2016. The new program supplied a limited number of military families in Westmoreland County with a box full of fresh, frozen, and nonperishable food items. The Food Bank worked with representatives from the Pennsylvania National Guard Family Assistant Center to deliver this much needed aid. With just two distribution events at the end of 2016, the Military Share Program has already served 68 families comprised of 179 individuals (110 adults age 18-59; 55 children age birth-17; and 14 seniors age 60+) with 71 boxes or 9,207 pounds of charitable food assistance. Since many who serve are hesitant to accept assistance, the aid was delivered in a convenient and discreet manner on-site at a local armory. Members of the military help protect us in our nation’s time of need, so it is only fair that we serve them in their time of need.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel

Where we work

Accreditations


Since 2011

Charity Navigator 2020

Awards

Agency Capacity Program of the Year 2010

Feeding America

Best on Time Receipts 2009

Feeding America

Community Partner of the Year 2010

Westmoreland County CSP

Non Profit of the Year 2010

Westmoreland Chamber of Commerce

Food Distribution Program of the Year 2012

Feeding America

Best on Time Receipts 2010

Feeding America

Best on Time Receipts 2011

Feeding America

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America - Affiliate 2000

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2009

Boards-by-Design 2004

Chamber of Commerce 1998

National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD) 2001

Pennsylvania Association of Nonprofit Organizations 2003

Pittsburgh Cares 2010

United Way Member Agency 1982

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food Pantry Distribution Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These metrics include retail and wholesale donors as well as donations from other Food Banks and the Feeding America National office.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food Pantry Distribution Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These pound reflect donated food. We also purchase food and receive Federal Commodities.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food Pantry Distribution Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric shows the number of unduplicated individuals served through our Food Pantry Distribution Program.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are the only food bank and largest food-assistance provider in Westmoreland County in terms of people served. The Food Bank is also widely recognized as the leading authority on hunger and is committed to public service. Evidence of this is our Mission to enable all Westmoreland County residents who are hungry or at risk of hunger to have ready access to food. We believe that meeting the food-assistance needs of low-income households is important as it strengthens families and our community. The Food Bank is supported by individuals, corporations, & foundations through charitable contributions and volunteerism.

Our success in achieving our Mission relies on public confidence and support. Therefore, it is imperative to serve as good stewards of charitable contributions, represent our work truthfully, and treat participants with dignity and respect. Ultimately, we commit to operate ethically and transparently in our programs, governance, finances, and fundraising, following values espoused by Feeding America. As a result of our commitment to these principles, our programs are participant-centered and results-oriented, and the Board of Directors and staff are galvanized around this doctrine.

As stated above, we are the only food bank and largest food-assistance provider in Westmoreland County in terms of people served. We have a dedicated staff and moreover, a dedicated pool of volunteers over 7,000 strong that help to accomplish our goals through their experience (administratively combined, we have over 107 years of experience in hunger relief), knowledge, and dedication. We have a warehouse staff that has a plethora of food warehousing experience as well which is the core to our work.

The Westmoreland Food Bank works diligently to maintain operational accountability and fiscal responsibility. In addition to meeting the credentials required to be a Feeding America member and secure AIB certification, the Food Bank also adheres to the Standards for Excellence as required by the Pennsylvania Association of Nonprofit Organizations (PANO) membership. Furthermore, the organization recently achieved the highly-coveted four-star rating from Charity Navigator, America's largest independent charity evaluator. In addition to the aforementioned affiliations, the Westmoreland County Food Bank is also active with state associations Feeding Pennsylvania and Hunger-Free Pennsylvania, as well as the United Way of Westmoreland County.

This year, the Westmoreland Food Bank projects that approximately $775,000 is needed to purchase food commodities which will be distributed to those seeking charitable food assistance. Being a member of the Feeding America network affords the organization the benefit of purchasing food through the Choice System. This access allows the Food Bank to purchase five dollars in retail food value for every dollar – maximizing the funds raised by the organization five-fold. The Westmoreland Food Bank maximizes all resources to efficiently serve 7,200 households each month. This work could mean the difference as to whether our less fortunate Westmoreland County neighbors go hungry or receive the food that they so desperately need.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve all individuals who self-declare they are at or below the 150% of federal poverty guidelines.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    During the pandemic, our pantries changed their distribution method from indoors to a drive thru.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Getting feedback from our consumers helps us to better understand their needs. We are able to ensure they are receiving food they can use and fits their dietary needs. We are also able to verify that they are being treated with respect at our agencies.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Westmoreland County Food Bank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Westmoreland County Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 02/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Kelly King

Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University

Term: 2021 - 2024


Board co-chair

Mr. Ronald Eberhardt

Lyn Marie Dwyer

Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill

Ellen Katter

Excela Health

Shujuane Martin

Private Industry Council of Westmoreland/Fayette Inc.

Judith Morrison

Wallace Tobin

Westmoreland County Children's Bureau

Marcia Kubas

William Penn Continuing Care Campus/Loyalhanna Continuing Care Campus

Matthew Rigo

AmeriServ Financial Bank

Brenda Batenburg

Brenda Batenburg Consulting

Kelly King

Saint Vincent College

Dan Hudock

Attorney

Graham Watkins

Giant Eagle, Inc.

Marcia Kubas

Loyalhanna Continuing Care Campus

Sean Sullivan

Live! Casino Pittsburgh

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.