Humility of Mary Housing

"Guiding the way to self-sufficiency for over 30 years."

aka HM Life Opportunity Services   |   Cuyahoga Falls, OH   |  www.hmhousing.org

Mission

TO PROMOTE AND STRENGTHEN THE SELF-SUFFICIENCY OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES, ESPECIALLY THE POOR,THROUGH ADVOCACY, SUPPORTIVE SERVICES AND QUALITY HOUSING.

Ruling year info

1946

President/CEO

Mr. Fred Berry

Main address

2251 Front Street Suite 210

Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44221 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

25-1592420

NTEE code info

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Supportive housing is a highly effective strategy combining affordable housing with intensive coordinated services to help vulnerable individuals and families stabilize and thrive. As identified by the Corporation for Supportive Housing, Ohio ranks as the state with the fifth highest need for supportive housing – after only Texas, California, New York, and Florida. High poverty rates and chronic underfunding of rental housing assistance programs converge to create this reality across northeast Ohio with low-income urban regions like the Cuyahoga-Elyria, Akron, Youngstown-Warren-Boardman Metropolitan Service areas particularly hard hit. In Ohio, on average there are only 43 affordable units of available rental housing per 100 Extremely Low Income (ELI) households. These factors lead to homelessness - locally and across the state. On any given day in Ohio, it’s estimated over 10,000 individuals are homeless, 999 are family households and 643 are unaccompanied young adults ages 18-24.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

HM Life Opportunity Services

HM Life Opportunity Services serves families trapped in the cycle of homelessness. The cycle is broken through supportive housing programs by helping families set goals to gain independence, stability and to reconnect with the community for supportive services, housing and employment.

HM Life Opportunity Services in Akron, Northfield Center, and Stow offers quality housing and support services to homeless, single parent families. Participants receive housing while they work with a case manager to identify goals and determine a plan of action for themselves and their children.

Population(s) Served
Families
People with disabilities

Faith House serves families trapped in the cycle of homelessness. The cycle is broken through supportive housing programs by helping families set goals to gain independence, stability and to reconnect with the community for supportive services, housing and employment.

Faith House, in in South Lorain, offers quality housing and support services to homeless, single parent families. Participants receive housing while they work with a case manager to identify goals and determine a plan of action for themselves and their children.

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people

Opportunity House serves young men, ages 18 - 24, trapped in the cycle of homelessness. The cycle is broken through supportive housing programs by helping the youth we serve set goals to gain independence, stability and to reconnect with the community for supportive services, housing and employment.

Opportunity House in, Garfield Heights, Oh, offers quality housing and support services to homeless, young men ages 18 - 24. Participants receive housing while they work with a case manager to identify goals and determine a plan of action for themselves in their efforts to regain and maintain self-sufficiency

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
Homeless people

The Emmanuel Community Care Center (ECCC) began as part of the outreach ministry of St. Rose Parish in Girard and the Sisters of the Humility of Mary. It is continuing its service to the needy as part of the HM Housing Ministry. The center provides four units of housing and supportive services for homeless individuals as well as food, clothing, emergency financial assistance and educational services to countless needy individuals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Humility of Mary Housing provides housing to low income seniors 62+ at Saint Patrick Manor in Wellington, Saint Timothy Manor and Saint Timothy Park Apartments in Garfield Heights, the Villa at Marian Park in Akron, and seniors age 55+ at Saint Martha Manor in Akron. With 206 units, in total, we provide safe, affordable, and quality housing. Combined with onsite property management and care coordination services seniors are able to live independently for as long as possible.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

CARF International 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Homeless people, People with disabilities

Related Program

HM Life Opportunity Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We meet the basic need of safe housing first, followed by frequent supportive services to address issues related to homelessness. Longer stays, fewer people served, means people are using services.

Average change in income of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

HM Life Opportunity Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Increase in income here is calculated for those who have exited the program (unless there were no exits).

Number of low-income families housed in affordable, well-maintained units as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

HM Life Opportunity Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Holding steady would indicate that people maintain their housing longer and turnover has decreased as a result.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of Humility of Mary Housing is to promote and strengthen the self-sufficiency of individuals and families, especially the poor, through advocacy, supportive services and quality housing. In serving the poor, the organization targets our community’s most marginalized populations - including low-income seniors, chronically homeless young men, and chronically homeless single parent families. The vision of the organization is to empower those served to live a more abundant life. All activities are executed under HMH’s core values of respect, integrity, justice, collaboration, and compassion.

Unlike other shelter options, families may stay as long as they need to build a stable pathway out of chronic homelessness. Faith House is the only Lorain County program operating under Humility of Mary's Caring Compass model - providing safe housing first, establishing a support plan, working at lasting independence, and strengthening life skills. There are always families waiting to enter Faith House. In essence, community need is never met,

Humility of Mary Housing’s Permanent Supportive Housing model revolves around the organization’s custom intervention approach - the Caring Compass. The Caring Compass provides an array of program and property management services designed to assist individuals and families to achieve residential stability and strengthen their support networks. The goals of the Caring Compass approach are to assist individuals and families served in:
1. avoiding a return to homelessness;
2. obtaining and maintaining permanent community housing
3. increasing employment opportunities;
4. enhancing financial wellbeing,
5. expanding participation in the community; and
6. promoting physical and mental wellbeing.

Humility of Mary Housing’s Permanent Supportive Housing programs have two prongs that work together to maximize success for residents.

First, the organization provides housing. At all Humility of Mary Housing sites, apartments are one, two, or three bedroom units and include a full kitchen, bathroom, living room, and independent heating and air conditioning systems. Most buildings also include a common entrance foyer with a controlled-access entry system. All apartments are fully furnished and equipped with appliances and on-site laundry facilities.

Second, the organization provides supportive services. HM Housing staff assist participants with any and all concerns that impact their ability to maintain housing. The type and scale of the specific supportive services available to participants is highly individualized, based on each household's strengths and special needs. Upon enrollment, the needs of each participating head-of-household are assessed around mental health, chemical dependency, and medical problems; educational and vocational/employment needs and interests; and parenting or children’s challenges.

Outside its core structure, the Caring Compass model has some key features designed to ensure that households remain in Permanent Supportive Housing or move to other appropriate permanent housing:

First, the model is designed to stabilize participants upon entry. Under the model, HMH staff offer assistance and intervention to help participants learn the basics of independent living and identify and change the patterns of behavior which threaten their ability to live a stable life.

Second, the model leverages the support of community partners. While the network of services provided by HMH staff is comprehensive, it should be clear that it is not meant to provide for all of the participants' needs. HMH staff link with other community agencies to form a multi-disciplinary group offering an array of resources.
Third, the Caring Compass approach to supportive services incorporates the Stages of Change model. Program staff members recognize that changes in behavior occur gradually - with the individual moving through stages from being uninterested to deciding and preparing to make a change. Once a commitment to change is made, determined action is taken and, over time, efforts to maintain the new behavior occur. Program participants receive a level of intervention appropriate to their position on the Stages of Change continuum.

Finally, HMH recognizes that substance use, legal and illegal, is a part of the world in which we live. While recognizing that the abuse of alcohol and other drugs is inherently harmful to the wellbeing of the individual, HMH has found it more effective to concentrate on an individual’s behavior rather than on the detection of alcohol or substance use. As a rule, HMH staff will not conduct alcohol or drug testing on program participants.

Humility of Mary Housing brings many capabilities to their mission and supporting programming.

Longstanding Support from the Sisters of the Humility of Mary - Humility of Mary Housing was started by the Sisters of The Humility of Mary. Still today, the mission enjoys support from the Sisters in many ways and the spirit of their charism resonates throughout the organization.

Strong Leadership and Experience - A senior leadership team including an Executive Director, Finance Director, Director of Programs & Services/ Quality Improvement, and a Director of Property/ Housing Services coalesce to run the organization. Together this group 40 years of nonprofit management experience combined. They and their team members regularly attend professional development opportunities. They are supported by a strong board of community leaders including a Sister Carolyn Marshall, HM, retired principal of Magnificat High School for girls.

HUD Oversight and Continuum of Care Involvement - Humility of Mary enjoys support and funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. We report back to HUD and other funders annually at a minimum out measurable outcomes to include successful program completion, income attainment, housing stability, and financial management. The organization is also part of the Continuum of Care entities across its service region.

Rigorous Evaluative Processes - Professionals at Humility of Mary are committed to quality evaluative processes. These are conducted for the purposes of outcome tracking, refining of organizational processes, improving resident experience, contributing to meaningful community and statewide data, and funder and stakeholder reporting.

Facilities Across the Region - Humility of Mary Housing provides housing & supportive services to homeless individuals and families and low-income seniors in four northeast Ohio counties for over 30 years.

CARF Accreditation - Humility of Mary Housing is proud to recently have achieved CARF Accreditation. CARF (The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities) Accreditation signals Humility of Mary Housing’s commitment to continually improving services, encouraging feedback, and serving the community.

Strong Community Partnerships - Humility of Mary Housing’s model leverages the support of community partners. Case managers help link residents with other community agencies to form a multi-disciplinary group offering an array of resources designed to meet the variety and complexity of needs presented by program participants. Estimate how many community partners across region?

Use of Best Practices - Permanent Support Housing is a nationally recognized model, widely considered best practice in meeting the needs of homeless individuals and families with disabilities.

Strong and Regularly Updated Strategic Plan - Humility of Mary operated under a Strategic Plan addressing organizational sustainability, evolving community need, and communications.

Recently marking its 30th anniversary, and under the leadership of newer Executive Director Fred Berry, Humility of Mary Housing has achieved several notable organizational accomplishments. First, leaders worked to address the sustainability of the organization. The endowment was increased from $425,000 in 2016 to over $560,000. Under the supervision of a new Finance Director hired in 2019, leaders are working to employ best practices, regulations, policies, and procedures to enforce stronger fiscal management and oversight. The organization submitted an application to be able to bill for Medicaid, which will dramatically support financial sustainability. Additionally, leaders made some notable staffing changes to best meet the goals of the organization. Maintenance manager and case manager positions and social work interns were added to fill gaps and expand programming. Job descriptions were reviewed and updated in 2019.

Humility of Mary faces several key future challenges and leaders will work to overcome these in the coming years. Some of these are unique to the organization and some are common among most nonprofits. External challenges include a growing need for services in this region and aging facilities. Internal challenges include unpredictability in government grant funding streams, challenges in identifying new stable long-term funding sources, and the difficulties that come with uniting a consolidated organization with several stakeholder groups and local identities.

Humility of Mary is operating under a Strategic Plan that runs through 2020. Under it, long-range plans are expressed as three overarching organizational goals. These goals address many of the challenges considered above and include 1) Obtaining and maintaining organizational sustainability; 2) Further defining the needs of the community served to respond to ever-evolving needs; and 3) Improving communication throughout the ministry by increasing clarity and promoting a consistent and compelling mission. The organization has made progress on these goals and will continue to work toward them this calendar year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Humility of Mary Housing
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Humility of Mary Housing

Board of directors
as of 6/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Matthew Jentner

Jentner Wealth Management

Term: 2017 - 2019

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/13/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/28/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.