PULSE

Cultivating a community of young servant leaders to transform Pittsburgh

aka PULSE   |   Pittsburgh, PA   |  www.pulsepittsburgh.org

Mission

PULSE cultivates a community of young servant leaders to transform Pittsburgh. We invite talented university graduates to partner with Pittsburgh nonprofits for a year of service and leadership.

Ruling year info

1996

Principal Officer

Chris B. Cooke

Main address

5615 Stanton Ave

Pittsburgh, PA 15206 USA

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Formerly known as

Mennonite Urban Corps Pittsburgh

EIN

25-1725062

NTEE code info

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

PULSE Year of Service

SERVE -
We partner with Pittsburgh nonprofits to develop
young adults to be the next generation of servant
leaders in our city. Nonprofit partners receive a
young, talented university graduate to build capacity
in their organization while the fellows receive
training and skill development.

LIVE -
We cultivate community by having our fellows live
together. Our fellows share meals, household tasks
and life together. As a result, they grow and develop
as individuals and as a cohort group of young
adults working to make change in Pittsburgh.

GROW -
We train and equip our fellows to become servant
leaders in Pittsburgh. We provide regular,
on going personal and professional development,
mentoring relationships and other opportunities to
give our fellows the support they need to succeed.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of the PULSE expansion is three-fold:
• To increase the civic engagement of more young adults (PULSE fellows) in Pittsburgh.
o Serve 30-40 young adults annually.
o Develop young adults through more than 40 seminars, two weekend retreat, mentoring relationship and one-on-one supervision meetings with program staff.
• To increased capacity-building and value added staffing services to the Pittsburgh nonprofit sector.
o Serve 30 nonprofit organizations annually.
o Supply 50,000 hours of skilled volunteer support to Pittsburgh nonprofits.
• To increase neighborhood and community engagement and social capital in the East End, Northside, and South Hilltop.
o Expand its neighborhood presence in East End, Northside, and South Hilltop by having six houses in these respective communities.
o Expand to have at least five micro-community engagement “nodes” out of the PULSE houses and office.

With ten years of sustained results, increasing interest from young adults as well as partner nonprofits and a strong balance sheet, PULSE is well positioned to As applications from highly qualified, university graduates has soared, so has interest from nonprofit partners seeking a nonprofit partnership with PULSE. The result is an increasing surplus of supply (talented university graduates) and demand (nonprofit partners) for service. The strategy involves capitalizing on the excess supply (talented university graduates) and demand (nonprofit partners) for service by focusing internally on quality outcomes through its program and nonprofit partnerships.

PULSE plans to strengthen and develop staff, maintain three to four months of operating reserves and spend a considerable amount of time assessing and strengthening policies, procedures and processes within the organization.

Externally, PULSE plans to respond to favorable market conditions (excessive interest from young adults and nonprofit partners). PULSE will continue to work to strengthen neighborhood partners and collaborate with organizations and individuals to increase engagement and maximize impact. PULSE has the growing reputation of delivering high quality young adults to nonprofits and working well with local residents to collaboratively meet needs in the community.

As mentioned, PULSE continues to see an increasing surplus of talented university graduates and demand from nonprofit partners. Couple this surplus of supply and demand for service with increased revenue from individuals, foundations and events and a solid staffing plan, and PULSE is poised for growth. PULSE has seen across the board growth on the revenue side. PULSE continues to operate at 80% earned revenue from nonprofit partners, creating a sustainable, market-based financial model that can successfully manage future growth.

Financials

PULSE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

PULSE

Board of directors
as of 10/2/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Laura Debick

Sisterson & Co. LLP

Term: 2019 - 2020


Board co-chair

Maggie Graham

Meet Maggie

Term: 2019 - 2020

Feyisola Alabi

City of Pittsburgh

Annie Clough

UPMC Health Plan

Laura Debick

Sisterson & Co. LLP

Maggie Graham

Meet Maggie

Victoria Hoang

GSPIA

Harry Kunze

Sapientia, LLC

Leilani Mears

PNC Bank

Kristian Penn

FedEx Ground

Justin Romano

Attisano & Romano

John Tompkins

PNC Bank

Mick Torre

Ernest & Young LLP

Nathan Troxell

PPG Industries

Josh Van Dyke

PNC Bank

Erin Williams-Hatala

Chatham University

Lucas Miller

K&L Gates

James Sisley

Bootay Bevington & Nichols LLC

Shawn O'Brien

PNC Financial Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No