Children's Advocacy Center of Benton County

Empowering Children to Find Their Voice

Little Flock, AR   |  www.cacbentonco.com

Mission

Empowering Children to Find Their Voice.

Ruling year info

2008

Executive Director

Natalie Tibbs

Main address

2113 Little Flock Drive

Little Flock, AR 72756 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-0158723

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Children's Advocacy Center (CAC) of Benton County seeks to provide a safe place for child abuse victims and their families to receive comprehensive services from dedicated professional interviewers, nurses, counselors and advocates in a child-friendly atmosphere through a coordinated team approach as well as provide education to the community. National statistics indicate that 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 5 boys will be sexually abused before their 18th birthday; 1 in 5 children are solicited sexually while on the internet; 20% of children are sexually abused before the age of 8; 65% of child sexual abuse never disclose their abuse in childhood; and 95% of child victims are abused by a family member or someone they know and trust.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Advocacy

The advocacy component acts to afford each family an opportunity for success by networking them with community agencies and offering them continuing support. Every family is assigned an advocate when they walk through our doors. Our role is to offer assistance with any needs and be a support system throughout this process.

Population(s) Served
Families

The forensic Interviewing component acts to provide an opportunity for alleged victims to disclose about maltreatment in a neutral, fact-finding interaction with a specially trained interviewer while utilizing a multi-disciplinary team approach. Forensic interviewers are trained to gather information in a developmentally-appropriate, legally- sound, non-leading, and non-suggestible manner. Our goal is to minimize trauma and the number of times a victim must tell their story.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
People with intellectual disabilities

The medical component acts to provide medical services for the purpose of cultivating healing and offering reassurance in order to instill hope in children during times of need. An on-site medical room is available for alleged victims that meet certain criteria for sexual assault nurse examinations (SANE).

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children

The mental health component acts to provide quality, holistic counseling services to children and their families by treating the whole child systemically in order to alleviate trauma symptoms and promote healing. Services include individual counseling, family counseling, and couples counseling. We offer several counseling approaches such as Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Play Therapy, Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), Trust Based Relational Intervention (TBRI), and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).

Population(s) Served
Families

The purpose of the education component is to empower our community with the tools and resources necessary to end child abuse.  To do this, we provide training and educational opportunities regarding all aspects of child maltreatment; as well as prevention and awareness efforts to highlight the prevalence of abuse and how the community can work together to be a safer place for children.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

National Children's Alliance 2019

Children's Advocacy Centers of Arkansas 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who received initial services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Though our vision is to eliminate child abuse, we hope to serve more children in need and educate the community on signs and symptoms of child abuse and how to report.

Number of counseling sessions conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Evidence-based, trauma-focused mental health sessions are a service essential to treating the whole child systematically to help them cope with the trauma and assist them in the healing process.

Number of forensic interviews conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Forensic interviews conducted in partnership with MDT ensure victims are not interviewed unnecessarily, and provide the opportunity for more children to disclose possible abuse in a safe setting.

Number of individuals educated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Children's Advocacy Center of Benton County's education program helps empower our community with the tools and resources necessary to recognize and report child abuse.

Number of medical examinations conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Specialized medical examinations are offered for the purpose of cultivating healing and offering reassurance in order to instill hope in children during times of need.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The CAC strives to provide comprehensive, efficient and compassionate care to each child and family that arrives at our Center. These evidence-based services are proven to minimize the impact of trauma and long-term effects of child abuse. Services that would otherwise cost thousands of dollars to families in crisis, are provided free of charge. In doing so, our goal is to facilitate healing for child abuse victims and their families to lead lives free of abuse.

Each of the CAC's core components are strategically designed to comprehensively respond to and prevent child abuse across Benton County.

The Advocacy component is designed to educate and guide children and family members in the aftermath of their crisis and trauma, while providing access to needed information, services, and support. If needed, advocates will refer clients for counseling and a licensed counselor will assess the severity of trauma symptoms within 30 days of their initial visit with our center. This early assessment will allow our agency to connect clients to the appropriate services, including ongoing support, more efficiently.

The Forensic Interviewing component is designed to provide an opportunity for alleged victims to disclose about maltreatment in a neutral, fact-finding interaction. Forensic interviewers are specifically trained to gather information in a developmentally-appropriate, legally- sound and non-leading manner. In providing such an environment, the CAC model minimizes re-victimization and decreases the number of times a victim must tell their story.

The Mental Health component provides quality, holistic trauma-focused counseling sessions in both English and Spanish to help diminish trauma symptoms, creating a path toward healing for all children and families. Trauma therapy models used include, but are not limited to, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR), Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), and Play Therapy.

The Education component combats child maltreatment by equipping the community with resources necessary to create a safe environment for children. This component focuses on expanding training curriculum to include content specifically addressing signs and symptoms of child abuse and strategies for prevention to equip professionals and caregivers.

The Medical component provides an opportunity for children to receive a medical assessment for the purposes of evidence collection onsite at the CAC. Currently, contract nurses are utilized for access to medical care at the CAC, rather than sending families to local urgent care facilities or emergency rooms. The team of nurses provides access to care 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for acute and chronic sexual abuse cases. This component also routinely provides physical abuse exams and hair follicle testing for drug-endangered children at the request of investigative agencies.

The CAC coordinates professional services with law enforcement, Department of Children and Family Services professionals, Benton County Prosecutor’s Office professionals and Arkansas State Police Crimes Against Children Division investigators in a child-friendly environment. The CAC and these agencies make up the multidisciplinary team who works collaboratively in response to child abuse allegations. The team meets biweekly for Case Review to discuss recent hotline calls to ensure information is shared so that the child and family are receiving the services needed and that justice may be served, when appropriate.

The CAC staff currently includes: trained forensic interviewers (one bilingual); four child advocates (two bilingual); a team of contract Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners who perform forensic medical exams at the Center with our video colposcope (medical equipment specifically designed for these exams); and four full-time staff therapists (one bilingual) who can each meet with the child and non-offending family members for trauma-focused counseling. CAC staff members not only have appropriate degrees, but they also have been specifically trained and equipped for child abuse issues and know how to provide the services needed for the child and non-offending family members. Interns are also utilized through degree-specific programs from local colleges and universities. Staff are trained to meet the needs of diverse populations, as well as to create an environment that is inclusive of all.

In 2020, the CAC provided initial services and advocacy support for 970 children, offered 910 forensic interviews, performed 95 forensic medical exams for children for sexual assault, and counseled children and their non-offending family members for 2,005 mental health sessions. We also facilitated training and education for 2,644 adults and 3,262 children. Since the CAC opened its doors, we have provided services to over 12,500 child abuse victims and their family members.

In March 2020, the CAC broke ground in Gentry, AR to establish a satellite Center (CAC West) to better serve children and families living in rural Western Benton County communities. Last year alone, an estimated 600 children would have been better served, had a facility existed in their local community. In October 2020, doors opened at CAC West and over 100 children have been served already.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    **** We are improving our waiting room set up to be more trauma-informed after feedback from our multidisciplinary team.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Children's Advocacy Center of Benton County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Children's Advocacy Center of Benton County

Board of directors
as of 3/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Markita Rogers

Kellogg's


Board co-chair

Chuck Hyde

Vistage

Denise Wright

Walmart

Tommy Coughlin

Grand Savings Bank

Hannah Flannigan

Mercy Health Systems

Eric Rowlee

Walmart

John Scudder

Walmart

Onika Williams

Community Member

Adam Holland

GSK Pharmaceuticals

Chad Raith

Ascension

Lori Collins

Community Member

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/06/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/06/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.