ALIMA USA, The Alliance for International Medical Action

Caring, Innovating, Together

aka ALIMA USA   |   New York, NY   |  www.ALIMA.ngo

Mission

ALIMA is a humanitarian medical aid organization based in Dakar, Senegal. It's ALIMA’s firm belief that all people should have access to quality health services, regardless of where they live and what resources they have. Our unique model adheres to three overarching principles: to provide high quality medical care and humanitarian assistance to vulnerable families in need; to partner with and help build the capacity of local medical organizations; and to conduct medical and operational research that brings innovation to the field, leading to sustainable solutions and improved delivery of humanitarian assistance. ALIMA centers everything we do around the patients we serve. ALIMA operates in some of the most underserved areas in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Notes from the nonprofit

ALIMA is a humanitarian medical organization based in Dakar, Senegal. Founded in 2009, ALIMA has quickly risen to be a respected actor in international humanitarian aid. It is ALIMA’s firm belief that all people should have access to quality health services, regardless of where they live and what resources they have. We center everything we do around the patients we serve. Nearly 90% of ALIMA’s programs occur in insecure areas or in the vicinity of conflict zones, and the majority of our patients are the most vulnerable: children, women, refugees and internally displaced people (IDPs). Our unique model adheres to three principal areas of expertise: • Providing direct medical care to the people who need it the most; • Partnering with and supporting the development of national medical organizations in our countries of operation; • Conducting operational and medical research to bring innovation to the field to improve the delivery of humanitarian aid.

Ruling year info

2008

Executive Director

Ms. Charlie Kunzer

Board President

Dr. Pierre Cremieux

Main address

One Whitehall Street 2nd Floor

New York, NY 10004 USA

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Formerly known as

Community Health International (CHI)

EIN

26-0397519

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

Hospitals and Primary Medical Care Facilities (E20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CHAD

Context:
Chad has one of the lowest human-development indices in the world, ranking 183 out of 187 nations. Life-expectancy barely reaches 50. It is also the 5th leading nation for infant mortality in the world (Unicef, 2012), the main causes of which, according to the WHO in 2012, are malaria, acute respiratory-tract infections, diarrheas, premature births and HIV.

The state of children’s health is greatly weakened by a strong prevalence of malnutrition, which exposes them even more to these pathologies. According to the Ministry for Water, only 47.3% of the population have access to drinking water and 12% to adequate sanitation.

ALIMA in Chad:
In partnership with the Chadian NGO, Alerte Santé, ALIMA is working in Ngouri district, which has a population of 197,000 people, about 40,000 of whom are aged under five.

To fight malnutrition ALIMA and Alerte Santé offer an integrated response that includes treating severe and moderate acute malnutrition by improving the quality and accessibility to care and treating the priority pathologies (diarrhea, malaria, respiratory-tract infections, etc.), which clearly are only made worse by malnutrition.

ALIMA and Alerte Santé also rehabilitate health-center infrastructures to provide access to water and sanitation and raise awareness of good hygienic practices in the communities in order to improve children’s health to prevent malnutrition.

To reach the greatest number of children, the program offers care free of charge to all patients and has a therapeutic feeding center and 15 out-patient feeding centers. It also implements screening from village to village by community health workers in order to detect disease as early as possible. This enables families to reduce their travel and to limit overcrowding in health facilities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Context:
Niger is the world’s 12th highest-ranking country for the mortality rate of children under five. Mainly because of malnutrition and the shortage or total lack of primary health care.

ALIMA in Niger:
Alima and a Niger NGO, BEFEN (Bien-Être de la Femme et de l’Enfant au Niger) work together in the fight against malnutrition and malaria in children under five (the most vulnerable age group) in the Mirriah and Dakoro districts, two of the most affected areas.

Alima and BEFEN are running a program for treating malnutrition and malaria. The partnership is also conducting the MUAC (Mothers Understand And Can do it) study so that mothers can be offered the opportunity to detect malnutrition.

Bien Etre de la Femme et de l’Enfant au Niger (BEFEN–Rayuar Iyali) is an humanitarian charity founded in 2002 under Niger law by a group mostly composed of Niger doctors. Politically unaffiliated, its purpose is to "promote well-being in Niger women and children in health and education”.

Alima and BEFEN work together with various others players to support the Niger Ministry of Health to try and reduce infant-childhood mortality. Unicef supplies therapeutic foods and medicine to malnutrition-treatment centers. WFP (World Food Program) supplies food to the accompanying mothers. Alima and BEFEN supervise the medical quality of the care and the project’s proper operational management.

The Alima/BEFEN program guarantees adapted treatment according to the children’s state of health through out-patient and in-patient care. Severely malnourished children who do not present medical complications or suffer from simple malaria are not admitted to hospital but are treated in out-patient care. Alima/BEFEN provide hospital care for those children needing more thorough medical follow-up.

Alima also trains community outreach agents in the early detection of severely malnourished children within the community. Early detection not only makes it possible to save lives but also limit, even avoid, the after-effects of malnutrition.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

The context
Mali is West Africa’s second largest country. Covered two-thirds by desert, it has a population of over 15 million.

The country’s primary cause of death is malaria, which accounts for 36% of all medical consultations. Children under five, an age group that is particularly vulnerable to the risk of death from it, are the most affected. With a chronic emergency level of malnutrition, Mali, despite the government’s efforts and the progress made, has the second highest mortality rate of children under five in the world. (WHO’s World Health Statistics Report, 2012).

At present there are an estimated 3.5 million people living in food insecurity.
This already perilous situation was made even worse early in 2012 when armed conflicts broke out in the country’s northern regions. Nearly a third of the north’s population has been displaced by the conflict, about 467,000 people.

Alima in Mali
Alima and its Malian partner, AMCP (Alliance Médicale Contre le Paludisme) have been present in southern Mali’s Koulikoro region since 2011, striving to reduce infant mortality, especially malaria and malnutrition.
Alima and AMCP are provding support for the medical, human and financial resources in local health facilities and support the implementation of a community workers network, which systematically screen children under five for malnutrition and refer children with severe acute malnutrition to community health centers.
The most serious cases are referred to and hospitalized in referral health centers where ALIMA and AMCP provide free quality treatment to children with severe acute malnutrition and malaria with complications.

Because of the poor health situation of the people living in the Timbuktu region, ALIMA opened a project in the Diré health district in April, 2012 and later in the Goundam district to improve health and nutritional conditions for all those affected by the conflict in the area.

Through this project, ALIMA provides free health care to the local population. Mobile clinics and support of the working community health facilities make it possible to treat the most common pathologies among the most isolated populations (malaria, diarrheas, skin diseases and respiratory-tract infections, etc.).

By placing the emphasis on treating children and pregnant women, ALIMA hopes to reduce infant mortality while ensuring free health care to the entire population affected by the conflict in the Diré and Goundam health districts.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

The context
In sub-Saharan Africa one child in nine dies before their fifth birthday, which is the world’s highest rate of infant-childhood mortality. The 2012 mortality rate of children under five in Burkina Faso was 146% (2012 UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation report), which makes it the 9th highest mortality rate in the world for this age group. In September 2012, the overall acute malnutrition rate stood at 10.9% (SMART survey), i.e. above the WHO’s 10% critical threshold.

Alima in Burkina Faso
In reaction to this worrying observation, the Burkina NGO, Keoogo contacted Alima with a view to creating a partnership so as to detect and treat malnourished children in Yako district.
A shared project for fighting severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children under five in the Yako health district has been operating since June of 2012.
A second project for treating SAM and pediatric emergencies was opened in June of this year in the Boussé health district.

Both these projects are being done through the partnership of two Burkina NGOs, Keoogo and Alima-supported SOS Médecins.

The TreatFOOD research project was opened in late January of this year in Yako in order to treat moderate acute malnutrition.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Africa's second largest country, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), lives in a constant state of health insecurity, suffering from chronically high health indicators, in particular infant mortality, and constant political insecurity in many of its provinces. Humanitarian operations are made all the more difficult by the country’s immense size and a lack of a road infrastructure.

ALIMA in DRC
ALIMA has been active in DRC since August 2011, with a focus on emergency outbreak response. This includes multiple outbreaks of cholera, measles and Ebola. Between 2013 and 2017 in the former
Katanga province, ALIMA had in place an emergency intervention team, known as RUSH, which supported the epidemiological surveillance, investigation and response to possible outbreaks.

In 2017, ALIMA continued to respond to emergencies, most notably, an outbreak of Ebola in the Bas-Uélé province and an outbreak of cholera in the Kanda-Kanda area.

In response to five confirmed cases of Ebola, including four deaths, in Likati (Bas-Uélé province) in May, ALIMA trained 20 medical staff on the management of patients with Ebola, supported three health
centers and set up two isolation units in Muma village. We also donated nearly two tons of medications and medical equipment, including protective kits to health authorities.

A few months later, in November, in response to an outbreak of cholera in Kanda-Kanda health district in Kasai, ALIMA treated more than 3,000 people for the water-borne disease. We also provided supplies of treated water to prevent the spread of the disease, and launched community awareness campaigns to
promote good hygiene practices.

Beyond emergency response, ALIMA started a new project in January 2017, which provides access to primary health care in the Opienge health district (Tshopo Province) for the host population and people displaced by conflict further east. In addition to primary care, ALIMA provides emergency obstetric and neonatal care, emergency medical care for victims of sexual violence and routine immunizations.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

ALIMA in Guinea
About half of Guinea’s population lives below the poverty line. The healthcare system is especially fragile and access to basic social services is extremely difficult for most of the population. It was in this very precarious medical and social context that Guinea experienced its first Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in December 2013.

On March 21, 2014, WHO officially declared the beginning of an epidemic. In Guinea, the epidemic accelerated throughout the month of August and saw a rapid expansion that was without precedent. On August 8, 2014, WHO declared a public health emergency of international concern and called for the adoption of appropriate measures to halt the epidemic’s spread. Given the emergency in Guinea and the rapid rise in the number of cases in August and September; in October, as part of the fight against EVD, ALIMA teams conducted an exploratory mission in Guinea to analyze the priority needs.

Working through the World Food Programme (WFP), Alima quickly built an Ebola Treatment Center (ETC) in Forested Guinea in Nzérékoré­­—the second largest city in the country. Support was also provided by the three transit centers in Nzérékoré, Beyla, and Lola. The ETC covered these three prefectures, where nearly a million people were affected. Opening on December 2, 2014, with an initial capacity of 25 beds; the ETC by the end of December had 40 beds in operation. From December 2, 2014 to February 2, 2015 a total of 125 patients were seen by ALIMA teams at the ETC, including 69 confirmed cases, 7 suspected cases, and 49 negative cases. 23 individuals were cured and 39 died.

Although the epidemic has been on the wane since December and January, there are numerous affected households and transmission chains that persist, especially in Forested Guinea. As of February 1, 2015, the country had recorded 2,975 cases with 1,944 deaths (63.5%). Fighting Ebola with medical and psychological interventions the medical management of Ebola-infected patients primarily consists of symptom or palliative treatments. The treatment of symptoms makes it possible to reduce pain experienced by patients and the non-specific intensive care increases their chances of survival. These measures include invasive procedures (the injection of drugs, perfusion, etc.), rehydration, and the treatment of symptoms (fever, pain, nausea, vomiting, dyspepsia, anxiety, agitation). The treatments are coordinated with biological analyses of the patients (renal function, electrolytes, etc.) that are performed on a daily basis. Medical management is accompanied by psychological support for the patient and family from the start of the intervention. This support continues regardless of circumstances, including when a patient is cured and the family desires to visit.

When a patient dies strict safety procedures must be followed for burial. The family has the opportunity to view the body of the deceased and follow the funeral conducted by the health teams. ALIMA also organizes activities to foster a trusting relationship between medical personnel, community workers, and the communities. The aim is to strengthen a sense of ownership among communities vis-à-vis the disease, so they can overcome their reticence and confront the situation at hand. These activities help raise awareness, inform and train populations about the disease, and explain the treatment methods used at the ETC. The ultimate goal is to quickly raise a red flag and get symptomatic people speedily admitted to the ETC in order to increase their chances for survival.

HOPE FOR A CURE
Because Ebola epidemics has been so rare, especially in Guinea, medical personnel lack information and data on treatment options and their impact on human health. With this in mind, and given the high mortality rate in treatment centers, ALIMA has participated since December 17, 2014 in a clinical trail in Guinea using the antiviral Favipiravir. This study is sponsored by INSERM and funded by France and the EU. The drug, known as Avigan, is produced in Japan by the Toyama Chemical laboratory and was originally used to treat the flu. One of the studies was conducted at the ALIMA ETC in Nzérékoré. Preliminary results indicate that this antiviral halves mortality among adults and adolescents presenting with a low viral replication rate and accelerates their recovery. The study is ongoing in the ALIMA treatment center, not only to further research, but also to improve patient chances for survival.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Following the takeover of the Seleka group in March 2013, the humanitarian situation in the Central African Republic has become precarious.
Conflicts between armed groups have created a context of extreme violence in which civilians are the victims.
In the district of Boda, outside the capital of Bangui, the violence has led to a split between the Muslim communities living in the area called the Enclave and the non-Muslim communities. This fragmentation, coupled with peaks of violence, severely damaged of the quality and access to basic health care. ALIMA opened programs in the area in June 2014 to ensure access to quality medical care to all people without discrimination.

As part of the medical response ALIMA implemented support activities at the general hospital in Boda, and a health center in the Enclave where more than 6000 people reside.
On both sites, ALIMA conducts medical activities in pediatrics, prenatal consultations, surgery and primary care. Despite the uncertain security situation, the ALIMA teams have maintained their activities in this area. In total, 17,000 general consultations, 2,000 hospitalizations, 209 deliveries and 300 surgical procedures were performed in 2014, a great challenge in this area at the center of a conflict where the health system has completely broken down.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

ALIMA is providing emergency medical care to thousands of displaced children suffering from severe malnutrition and a deadly measles outbreak in northern Nigeria. Following a United Nations alert in May about the dire situation of people displaced by conflict in north-eastern Nigeria, ALIMA conducted an exploratory mission in Monguno, a city in Borno state where more than 150,000 displaced people are seeking refuge. ALIMA found alarming high rates of acute malnutrition and increased risk of death. Working alongside the Ministry of Health, ALIMA supported the vaccination of children against measles.

ALIMA has now deployed additional resources including a full international medical team and opened a clinic to provide urgent medical care to displaced people in Monguno. ALIMA medical teams have already treated large numbers of children suffering from severe acute malnutrition and continues to care for dozens of patients each day. A deadly measles epidemic is raging and ALIMA has treated over 700 cases in Monguno. ALIMA is also preparing to provide medical support to others in need in Borno State.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Since May 2016, ALIMA is providing medical and nutritional care at the Mokolo district hospital, near the Nigerian border. ALIMA provides nutritional and pediatric care for children under the age of 5 who suffer from medical complications and require hospitalization.

At the intensive therapeutic feeding center at Mokolo Hospital, ALIMA teams treat children suffering from severe acute malnutrition. The organization also hospitalizes and treats refugee children from the Minawao camp, which represent more than 30% of admissions. The most frequently treated pathologies include respiratory infections, neonatal infections, watery diarrhea, and malaria.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

The medical provision in Lol State in the north west of Sudan has been badly affected by the civil war. The violence has forced the closure and disruption of medical facilities in the region, and few humanitarian agencies are operating there.

ALIMA began running medical programs in Lol State in May 2017. The organization supports the State Hospital in Lol’s capital, Raja, where a hospitalization and care unit has been set up. Medical teams treat children suffering from acute malnutrition, as well as acute diarrhea and respiratory infections.

The organization is also providing medical care in an IDP camp located in the heart of the village of Deleba, a two-hour drive from Raja’s hospital. During an exploratory mission in May 2017, ALIMA screened nearly 200 children. This nutritional screening revealed an overall malnutrition rate of 30%, with severe acute malnutrition present among 2% of the children. A mobile team now works in the IDP camp, conducting an average of one hundred pediatric consultations per day and offering free ambulatory care.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ALIMA's innovative operational approach and research programs aim to deepen the impact of our humanitarian work and help us save as many lives as possible.

ALIMA's goal is to treat more patients and save even more lives by providing high-quality medical care that is adapted to each humanitarian crisis.

To offer improved treatments in ongoing medical crises such as malaria, acute malnutrition, and associated illnesses. We also aim to deliver comprehensive and systematic pediatric treatment programs to reduce infant and child mortality.

We invest in medical innovation by using research to improve what we do in humanitarian crises, we seek to deliver sustainable medical solutions to people who wouldn't otherwise have access to treatment.

Financials

ALIMA USA, The Alliance for International Medical Action
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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ALIMA USA, The Alliance for International Medical Action

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Elya Tagar

Alan Harper

Catherine Dumhait-Harper

Pierre Cremieux

Elya Tagar

Glenda Hersh

Julie Rousseau

Cecily Gallup

Kris Torgeson

Anne Catherine Faye

Bernard Yancovich

Alon Unger

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data