GOLD2024

These Numbers Have Faces, Inc.

aka These Numbers Have Faces   |   Portland, OR   |  www.thesenumbers.org

Mission

We educate and equip Africa’s brightest young leaders, empowering them to cultivate thriving communities.

Ruling year info

2008

Principal Officer

Mr. Jim Pressnell

Main address

PO Box 13056

Portland, OR 97213 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-0416765

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Higher Education Institutions (B40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many of Africa’s problems today are leadership issues. Africa needs educated, young people with the leadership, vocational and professional skills required to make a transformational difference in their communities. Unfortunately, access to a university education is difficult for the poor, disadvantaged, and displaced in Rwanda. Only 5% of high school graduates attend university. Nor does successful university graduation guarantee vocational and professional success. Finding meaningful employment is still challenging and difficult. The Inter-University Council of East Africa found the majority of university graduates do not have the vocational and professional skills to be employable. In 2020, Transforming Employability for Social Change in East Africa identified five skill areas as most deficient: · Analytical skills · Teamwork and interpersonal skills · Self-development and Leadership · Self-management · Communication skills These are the skills we develop in our students

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Africa Programming - Leadership Development and Community Impact

Educate. We recruit very bright students from poor, rural, and post-conflict communities who otherwise would not have opportunity to attend university. We provide tuition, room & board, books, and school fees to access a university education in Rwanda.

Equip. We facilitate monthly Leadership Development Workshops to grow the professional skills of our students so they can be successful servant leaders who make a transformational difference in their communities.

Empower. We require all of our students to give at least 50 hours every school year to a Community Impact Project they design and implement to meet a need and make a difference in their communities. This is where our students, as servant leaders, apply what they are learning in their classrooms and Leadership Development Workshops to real life community development opportunities.

Just $4,200 provides a full year of tuition, books, transport, and programming.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

Where we work

Awards

Nonprofit of the Year 2010

African Messanger

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our overall goal is to have each of our students graduate from university and our program with the vocational and professional skills necessary to be strong, employed, empowered leaders facilitating sustainable, transformational change within their communities. In Rwanda, only 41% of university graduates are able to get paying jobs within two years. However, currently, 90% of students graduating from our program are able to get paying jobs within two years -- 70% get good jobs within six months. This is a direct result of our monthly Leadership Development Workshops, which are designed specifically to develop the vocational and professional skills necessary to be effective leaders.

Our program activities are specifically designed to help us achieve our goals. Our strategies are organized around three key words: Educate, Equip, and Empower.

Educate: We recruit very bright students from poor, rural, and post-conflict communities who otherwise would not have opportunity to attend university. We provide tuition, room & board, books, and school fees – whatever is necessary for our students to access a university education in Rwanda.

Equip: We have built our monthly Leadership Development Workshops on East African research identifying the most critical vocational and professional skill sets lacking in the majority of university graduates in Rwanda: analytical skills, teamwork and interpersonal skills, self-development and leadership, self-management, and communication. We work hard to address these critical needs so that our students are indeed sought after as new employees upon graduation. In addition, almost all of our workshops are facilitated by Rwandans who know the Rwandan context well and can address critical issues from a Rwandan perspective. Also, we incorporate input and feedback from our students to identify the issues they see as most critical to address, which we then incorporate into our workshops. Finally, and perhaps even more importantly, we know that less than 5% of young women in sub-Saharan Africa actually attend university. Yet, we also know that educating women is one of the most effective ways to address poverty both within their families and within their communities. Therefore, we work hard to ensure at least half of our students are women. In addition to our monthly Leadership Development Workshops, we also offer quarterly workshops just for the women in our program, bringing in successful female leaders from the community, including nonprofit, business, and government leaders. Our goal is for the women in our program to be strong, empowered women who make a transformational difference within their families and their communities. We also offer quarterly workshops for the young men in our programs to help them mature as men who know how to be selfless leaders who work well with empowered women.

Empower: We require all of our students to give at least 50 hours every school year to a Community Impact Project they design and implement to meet a need and make a difference in their communities. This is where our students, as servant leaders, apply what they are learning in their classrooms and Leadership Development Workshops to real life community development opportunities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

These Numbers Have Faces, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

These Numbers Have Faces, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kris Kuhn

FLHS

Term: 2018 -

Kris Kuhn

FLHS

Courtney LeBoeuf

Hasson Company Realtors

Claude Nsengiyumva

Lutheran Community Services Northwest

Benson Nsanzabandi

Lewis and Clark College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/18/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/30/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.