INSTITUTE FOR CULTURAL COMMUNICATORS INC

The Institute for Cultural Communicators helps ordinary students become extraordinary leaders.

Murfreesboro, TN   |  iccinc.org

Mission

The vision of the Institute for Cultural Communicators is a global community empowering next generation Christians to influence today's culture.

Ruling year info

2009

Principal Officer

Dr. Teresa Moon

Main address

2441Q Old Fort Parkway #394

Murfreesboro, TN 37128 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-0721544

NTEE code info

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today’s students around the world are plagued by discouragement, disrespect, apathy, bullying, and destructive behaviors. When kids can’t articulate their beliefs, they begin believing the articulate people must be right. Kids raised in Christian homes with Christian education are walking away from church and faith. Today’s family is raising children in not just a non-Christian culture, but in anti-Christian communities. This impacts communities at large. Christian values like integrity, honesty, respect, trustworthiness, and kindness are being replaced in contemporary youth cultures by depression, destruction, and desertion. ICC empowers nextgen Christians to influence today’s culture in the most positive ways. These emerging leaders embody the behaviors associated with our core values: innovation, mentoring, peacemaking, cultural communication, community, and transformation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Chapters

ICC Membership Benefits include:

•Member Portal

◦Member Pricing



•Communication on leading and mentoring students


•Training and Equipping of all chapters members

◦Young Communicators for Christ Student (6-10 years old)


◦Young Speakers Guild Students (11-18 years old)


◦Student Leaders (14 -18 years old)


◦Coaches



•Registration Access and Member Pricing to

◦ICC Forensics Events


◦Leadership Training


◦International Convention (iCON)


◦Learning Academy online courses



•Student Leadership Opportunities for those who meet eligibility

◦Student Leader Training and Calls


◦Area Student Leader Council


◦National Student Leader Council


◦National Student Leader Media Team

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Training the next generation of Christians to stand up for their faith.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

We also maintain the ICC Academy, which gives students and coaches across the globe access to expert personal and professional coaching designed to build communication and leadership skills. The ICC Academy provides resources to intergenerational and leadership teams in digital learning environments when and where it works for them.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ICC exists to build and support a growing global community empowering next generation Christians to influence today’s culture. We help ordinary students become extraordinary leaders. We provide a plan for helping today’s students stay on the path toward living a Christian life.
We help students find their voice. When a student’s voice is found, she or he grows in confidence and conviction, no longer susceptible to destructive beliefs or behaviors.
Students who know they have a voice recognize that they have value. When they are valued, they are no longer susceptible to behaviors that devalue them.
We are helping parents and teachers communicate value to students, calling them up to character-driven leadership of their peers. Our students are becoming better students, more productive workers, more engaged teammates, and more loving family members.

ICC uses various strategies to accomplish our mission and vision, all focusing on empowering competence, community, and character. We have chapters around the world that provide safe mentoring communities for students of all ages to grow and develop communication and leadership skills together. We host live events in many different countries to provide immersive training for all ages of both students and parents or coaches.
We also maintain the ICC Academy, which gives students and coaches across the globe access to expert personal and professional coaching designed to build communication and leadership skills. The ICC Academy provides resources to intergenerational and leadership teams in digital learning environments when and where it works for them.

Volunteers
The Institute recruits and develops volunteers for mission impact. There are currently 160 adult volunteers working alongside another 200+ high school and college volunteers. ICC volunteers coach students of all ages; lead local community groups; host live events; provide hospitality to event attendees and traveling teams; design curricular resources; chaperone mobilized student teams and leadership residencies; coordinate transportation, food, lodging, and communication; and support every aspect of ICC’s mission.

Academy
The ICC Academy provides live instructor-led training and asynchronous, on-demand courses to equip students, teachers, parents, and coaches across the globe. Academy courses make it possible for more students each year to access ICC’s transformational training.

Training Center
ICC’s Training Center features a 4600 square foot residence on 5 acres in central Tennessee. The Center houses dozens of high school students annually in leadership residencies. These emerging leaders have access to coaching in communication and leadership skills; a state-of-the-art media lab; service opportunities in the community; emotional intelligence coaching; and practical teamwork experience. Emerging student leaders receive mentoring in the competencies most sought after in higher education and in the marketplace: communication, collaboration, critical thinking, creativity, and cultural intelligence.

Curriculum
Customized intellectual property has been designed to advance the ICC mission for students of all ages. ICC’s customized content is delivered through live events, online courses, school classrooms, and family-based community groups. ICC’s curricular resources have been digitized for easy access to students around the globe.

Donors
A growing group of partners is committed to supporting the ICC mission and vision. Initiatives to grow this funding are underway. In the meantime, an increasing percentage of ICC’s annual budget is met through the contributions of generous donors.

ICC’s progress is seen in our growing presence in more countries across the globe, the growth in online course offerings, and the competencies and character demonstrated by our emerging leaders.
So far, ICC has identified representatives across the U.S. and in over 20 countries. Private schools and independent family-based curriculum groups are active in many different countries around the world.
The ICC Academy currently hosts courses three trimesters a year for students, parents, coaches, educators, and business professionals. Grade school, middle school, and high school students, teachers, parents, and coaches across the globe have access to this world-class training. The Academy also provides on-demand, easy-access beginning courses for students of all ages along with their teachers and coaches. Some next steps for the Academy include: translating curriculum into other languages (several in-progress); developing more resources to train instructors; providing access to more helpful resources to parents and teachers everywhere.
Our chapters, offered both online and in-person for further reach, produce competent, character-driven communicators and leaders. Our chapter curriculum now equips emerging leaders with greater emotional intelligence each year. Our student leadership programs are preparing more competent leaders every year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently brought back our Communicators for Christ Conferences by popular demand in many regions. After the pandemic, we used phone interviews and feedback forms to decide how we would move forward in hosting our typically-in-person events. We even price our products based on feedback from our audiences and stakeholders.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

INSTITUTE FOR CULTURAL COMMUNICATORS INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

INSTITUTE FOR CULTURAL COMMUNICATORS INC

Board of directors
as of 3/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Teresa Moon

Institute for Cultural Communicators

Term: 2009 - 2025


Board co-chair

Dr. Scott Wilcher

Adjunct Professor at Regent University

Term: 2016 - 2025

Lisa Kays

John McLean

Stacey Campbell

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/12/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data