Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP)

It Takes a Network to Fight a Network

Washington, DC   |  http://www.occrp.org

Mission

By developing and equipping a global network of investigative journalists and publishing their stories, OCCRP exposes crime and corruption so the public can hold power to account. As an investigative reporting platform for a worldwide network of independent media centers and journalists, OCCRP is reinventing investigative journalism as a public good. In the face of rising costs and growing threats to independent media, OCCRP provides media outlets and journalists with a range of critical resources and tools including digital and physical security and allows those covering the most sensitive topics to work in teams with trusted editors.

Ruling year info

2012

Co-Founder and Publisher

Andrew Sullivan

Co-Founder and Chief of Innovation

Paul Radu

Main address

1220 L St. NW Ste 100 #497

Washington, DC 20005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-0898750

NTEE code info

Media, Communications Organizations (A30)

Citizen Participation (W24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The last five decades have seen the dramatic globalization of organized crime & corruption, now totaling trillions of dollars every year. With the help of a “criminal services industry” — corrupt banks, law firms, & lobbyists — criminal networks have steadily grown their markets, and the world’s most corrupt officials & tycoons easily loot, launder, & hide stolen money for future use. The result is an unprecedented transfer of wealth & global web of high-level corruption & organized crime that has fueled inequality, the rise of extremist groups, & the decline of democratic institutions all over the world. People living in developing countries pay the highest price, losing $20-40 billion yearly — funds that are exploited, stolen, & siphoned off into private accounts in the West instead of supporting development. The rise of disinformation coupled with the threat to a free, independent press further exacerbates the problem as the public suffers from a lack of credible information.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Networked Cross-Border Journalism

OCCRP pioneered a cross-border reporting model that allows for exposing corruption in one part of the world enabled by illicit actors and financial flows in another. By partnering locally and working globally, we build a better understanding of how regional actors and networks fit into the larger web of global crime. The symbiotic relationship with our member centers and partners on the ground brings more data and insights, in turn, building the network’s unique understanding of how global corruption operates. Journalists in our network learn from each other and, with each new dataset and project, gain expertise in criminal patterns and trends, which helps us identify new opportunities for collaboration in the public interest. This gives OCCRP the unique ability to understand and dissect criminal networks down to their smallest components and to expose and halt the mechanisms that allow them to flourish.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Global Anti-Corruption Consortium was launched to accelerate the fight against corruption around the world by combining hard-hitting investigative journalism with the skillful engagement of civil society.

By developing sophisticated follow-the-money data tools and strategies, OCCRP helps journalists around the world uncover complex illicit financial schemes. Advocacy groups, in turn, are well-positioned to demand justice and more accountable governments. The Global Anti-Corruption Consortium turns headlines into action by arming civil society with the information and evidence needed to create meaningful change, whether by holding corrupt officials to account, calling for policy reforms, or generating grassroots campaigns.

While corrupt officials and criminal networks are increasingly organized and globally coordinated, journalists and civil society have often worked in silos. We believe that strategic alliances between those fighting corruption are essential if we are going to drive real change.

The Global Anti-Corruption Consortium brings together investigative reporting from OCCRP and advocacy efforts driven by Transparency International. Since 2016, it has exposed money-for-influence scandals, global money-laundering vehicles, and how corrupt officials have exploited natural resource wealth, and pushed for reforms to combat graft around the globe.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship 2020

Skoll Foundation

Tom Renner Award 2019

Investigative Reporters and Editors

Best Data-Driven Reporting - Large Newsrooms 2020

Sigma Award

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Illicitly acquired funds returned to the public sphere

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Networked Cross-Border Journalism

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since we began recording impact in 2011, our investigations have contributed to: $7.3+ billion in fines levied and monies seized

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

OCCRP is reinventing investigative journalism as a public good and aims to build a world where lives, livelihoods, and democracy are not threatened by crime and corruption. We reveal and explain the relationship between money and power and serve as a catalyst that arms others with the information needed to drive positive change. As investigative journalists, we expose crime and corruption at the highest levels. Using these revelations, advocates can press for policy reform and package information for law enforcement, which has the authority to act on evidence and deliver justice. Policymakers can point to investigative findings to pass legislation and advance reforms. Citizens who read our work get the information they need to act and organize on their own behalf. We see a future where corruption and organized crime are drastically reduced and democracy is strengthened as a result of a more informed citizenry, increased accountability, and sharply higher costs for criminal activity.

OCCRP’s unique way of working includes rebuilding trust in investigative journalism, sustaining the field by supporting and protecting the journalists in our 50+ member center network, and partnering with civil society to accelerate the impact of our reporting. At a time of historic disinformation, we are rebuilding the public’s trust in investigative journalism through a fierce adherence to the truth. With more than 40 editors around the world, OCCRP takes a ‘training by doing’ approach to working with investigative reporters across our independent media outlets around the world. A team of core editors coordinates stories across continents, while our regional editors work with our local member centers and publishing partners to drive cross-border and global projects. With a number of OCCRP regional editors embedded in our member centers and a rigorous fact-checking process for every story, our editorial structure and process ensures our global network adheres to the highest editorial standards. With investigative reporters too often smeared and discredited by the subjects they expose, strengthening the quality and value of investigative reporting ensures citizens know the truth — and helps rebuild critical public trust in independent media.

From digital and physical security to pro-bono legal assistance to fundraising, OCCRP provides its member centers with a range of services and support essential to doing and sustaining the work at a time of growing challenges for independent media around the world. For smaller, independent outlets that regularly face smear campaigns and unfounded charges — often from government-affiliated media and officials — OCCRP offers a global voice, amplifying threats and bringing cases to the attention of the global press freedom community to push back.

Protection and safety of journalists is paramount for OCCRP. Our collaborative journalism model brings scrutiny and helps deliver justice. In cases of imprisonment and murder, our collaborative, cross-border approach sends a clear message killing a journalist will not kill the story.

OCCRP believes that strategic alliances are essential to driving real change. We lead the Global Anti-Corruption Consortium (GACC), bringing together OCCRP’s global network of journalists and Transparency International’s global movement of anti-corruption advocates to arm civil society with the information and evidence needed to mobilize grassroots campaigns, advance policy reforms, and bring corrupt officials to justice.

OCCRP pioneered a cross-border reporting model that allows for exposing corruption in one part of the world enabled by illicit actors and financial flows in another. By partnering locally and working globally, we build a better understanding of how regional actors and networks fit into the larger web of global crime. The symbiotic relationship with our member centers and partners on the ground brings more data and insight, in turn, building the network’s unique understanding of how global corruption operates. Journalists in our network learn from each other and, with each new dataset and project, gain expertise in criminal patterns and trends, which helps us identify new opportunities for collaboration in the public interest. This gives OCCRP the unique ability to understand and dissect criminal networks down to their smallest components and to expose and halt the mechanisms that allow them to flourish.

Our top-notch data and tech teams equip journalists with cutting-edge tools to follow the money, distill webs of relationships, and communicate securely. We developed OCCRP Aleph, an investigative data platform that enables collaborative, secure investigations. Aleph gives journalists the ability to search and cross-reference more than a billion records to trace criminal connections and patterns and efficiently join forces across countries. The power of Aleph grows with each investigation as media outlets in our network add data, contributing to OCCRP’s ability to identify and expose global illicit activity.

Since 2006, OCCRP has pioneered a global investigative reporting model that proves how networked, collaborative journalism creates real and lasting change. OCCRP has grown from six journalists working in five countries to one of the world’s largest investigative journalism platforms, with more than 150 team members in more than 30 countries.

Working with our member centers and top-notch data, technology, and research teams, we’ve uncovered four massive financial vehicles — which we’ve called Laundromats — that allow corrupt politicians, organized crime figures, and wealthy business people to secretly move money across international borders and invest their ill-gotten millions, launder money, and evade taxes. The published Laundromat investigations resulted in sanctions and arrests, bank closures, stronger laws, and new watchdogs measures. For example, following our 2017 Azerbaijani Laundromat series, which exposed a $2.9 billion money-laundering operation and slush
fund run by Azerbaijan’s ruling elite, the UK passed the Criminal Finances Act, which introduced the Unexpected Wealth 
Order, a new tool for use against those suspected of money laundering. Thirteen members of the Parliamentary
 Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) were thrown out of the organization for accepting gifts and bribes from the 
Azerbaijani government. The Estonian branch of Danske Bank was shuttered.


Our 2019 Troika Laundromat series revealed a scheme that channeled billions out of Russia and was cited by German 
authorities as prompting raids on suspects accused of laundering $8.3 million in Germany. Spanish authorities opened an investigation into four lucrative properties allegedly bought with the laundered money off of Costa Brava, whose cost ran to $14 million.

We developed OCCRP Aleph, an investigative data platform that processes and sorts the massive amounts of data we receive to better conduct collaborative, follow-the-money investigations. Aleph gives journalists the ability to search and cross-reference more than a billion records to trace criminal connections and patterns and efficiently join forces across countries. We open source Aleph’s technology so other industries can benefit from what we’ve built.

OCCRP and its member centers continue to win a host of top awards every year and we were the first media organization to win the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship in the award’s 17-year history, for having a “significant, proven impact on some of the world’s most pressing problems.”

Going forward, we are pursuing an ambitious new strategy to take our work and organization to the next level, with significant innovation in our journalism formats, advancements in audience engagement, equipping and expanding our global network and bolstering our infrastructure — from internal efficiencies to a diversified funding base to increased investment in our culture and people — to support and scale a truly global organization.

Financials

Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP)
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP)

Board of directors
as of 2/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Marina Gorbis

David Boardman

Dean, Klein College of Media and Communications, Temple University

Anders Alexanderson

Executive Vice President, Stockholm School of Economics, Riga

Sue Gardner

Victor Jacobsson

Entrepreneur

Saska Cvetkovska

Co-Founder, Investigative Reporting Lab - Macedonia

Andrew Sullivan

Ex Officio Director

Paul Radu

Ex Officio Director

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data