United Against Human Trafficking

We Fight So That All May Live Free

aka UAHT   |   Houston, TX   |  https://uaht.org/

Mission

To end human trafficking through preventing exploitation, educating the community, and empowering survivors.

Ruling year info

2007

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Timeka Walker

Chief Operating Officer

Mr. Titus Benton

Main address

PO Box 541184

Houston, TX 77254 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition

EIN

26-1103492

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of United Against Human Trafficking (UAHT) is to end human trafficking through preventing exploitation, educating the community, and empowering survivors. We fight so that all may live free. Despite its global reach, human trafficking takes place locally — in a favorite nail salon or restaurant; in a neighborhood home or popular hotel; on a city street or rural farm. An individual can be trafficked within any industry or type of work and need not be transported physically from one location to another to be trafficked. An individual is trafficked if force, fraud, or coercion is used to make the individual work, or if a minor is trafficked for sex by any means, regardless of a trafficker’s use of force, fraud, or coercion. The circumstances of victims can vary considerably. Sex trafficking victims may consent to romantic involvement with someone who then coerces them into prostitution.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Client Services

We provide wrap-around case management for survivors of sex and/or labor trafficking as they journey to full, holistic recovery and economic empowerment. We reach out to vulnerable populations to identify overlooked trafficking victims. We facilitate trauma-healing support groups for victims and families affected by trafficking. Our program Family Huddle is the only support group in the area for child sex trafficking victims that incorporates the entire family into the healing process.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Children and youth
Victims of crime and abuse

We train community members and frontline professionals such as social service providers, educators, and hospitality workers how to recognize the signs of exploitation and respond safely. We teach students how to spot trafficker grooming tactics and equip at-risk children with the healthy life skills they need to avoid falling into exploitation. We disrupt demand for trafficking through peer support groups for men convicted of buying sex.

Population(s) Served
Victims of crime and abuse
Immigrants and migrants
Economically disadvantaged people
At-risk youth
Adults

Our 65+-member Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition (HRRC) collectively strategizes local efforts against exploitation. We share resources, provide mentorship, and uphold a united response to human trafficking. Our service referral network The Pathway allows victim assistance agencies and their clients to access diverse care across the Greater Houston Area from the convenience of a single platform.

Population(s) Served
Victims of crime and abuse
Adults
Academics
Activists

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students taught how to avoid and navigate human trafficking situations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Parents, Caregivers, At-risk youth

Related Program

Prevention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth Awareness, Youth Prevention, Parent Workshops

Number of case management clients newly enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims of crime and abuse, Adults

Related Program

Client Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

PROGRAM LAUNCHED IN 2020: Case Management for adult survivors of human trafficking.

Number of clients participating in support groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Adults, Children and youth, Incarcerated people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Client Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Trauma-informed peer support programming to prevent cycles of (re)victimization in survivors of human trafficking and other severe trauma.

Number of potential or current trafficking victims engaged through direct outreach

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Immigrants and migrants, LGBTQ people, People with diseases and illnesses, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Prevention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Prevention

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Training to identify and respond to trafficking situations.

Number of coalition members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Activists, Academics, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Collaboration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Houston Rescue & Restore Coalition (HRRC)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal at United Against Human Trafficking is to end trafficking by unifying the movement and strategically creating programs that fill in the gaps of services for victims and survivors.

We fight both sex and labor trafficking in three ways: prevention, client services, and collaboration.

Prevention: We train frontline professionals such as social service providers, educators, and hospitality workers how to recognize the signs of exploitation and respond safely. We teach students how to spot trafficker grooming tactics and equip at-risk children with the healthy life skills they need to avoid falling into exploitation. We reach out to vulnerable communities such as the homeless, immigrants, substance-dependent, and others to direct them to community resources and identify overlooked victims. We disrupt demand for trafficking through peer support groups for men convicted of buying sex.

Client Services: We provide wrap-around case management for survivors of sex and/or labor trafficking as they journey to full, holistic recovery. We facilitate trauma-healing support and other alternative therapy groups for victims and families affected by trafficking. We assist clients with housing payments to ensure they remain safe and sheltered from traffickers.

Collaboration: Our 55+-member Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition (HRRC) collectively strategizes for local efforts against exploitation. We share resources, provide mentorship, and uphold a united response to human trafficking. Our service referral network The Pathway allows victim assistance agencies and their clients to access diverse care across the Greater Houston Area from a single platform.

UAHT is led by Timeka Walker, a Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW) with over 17 years of experience in nonprofit management and operations. As the CEO, Ms. Walker ensures the overall operation of the organization in order to achieve its mission. Her leadership role in the Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition with 50+ other Executive Directors /CEOs allows her to be on the pulse of survivor needs in Houston. She leads a strong and experienced team of social workers, project managers, and development professionals.

UAHT is governed by an active Board of Directors that meets 12 times a year and holds special meetings as needed. The Board is made up of professional and entrepreneurial leaders in the community, all passionate about UAHT's mission. Board committees (Executive, Finance, Development, and Strategic Planning) review finances; review, initiate, and support fund development activities; initiate, implement, and review long-range planning goals; review and update/revise organizational policies; provide general oversight; address governance issues; plan special events; and other tasks as needed.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS
1. Appointed by the Attorney General of Texas in 2010 to serve on the state-wide Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force.
2. Developed a comprehensive health care training program on human trafficking called Human Trafficking and the Health Care Professional: Look Beneath the Surface and H.E.A.R. Your Patient in 2010. This program educates health professionals on identifying victims in the clinic setting.
3. Launched the first prevention training program in Texas for at-risk youth in 2011. The program aims to prevent youth from falling victim to labor and sexual exploitation. It is the first program of its kind in Texas.
4. Appointed by the Mayor of Houston in 2012 to serve on the Mayor’s Advisory Council on Immigration and Refugee Affairs and to Chair the Sub- Committee on Human Trafficking, which transitioned in 2015 to the Houston Area Council on Human Trafficking. UAHT chaired the Prevention Sub- Committee.
5. The Department of State designated UAHT as a key organization for international delegations to consult with while looking to improve anti-trafficking efforts. UAHT has met with 12 delegations from countries all over the globe. As a result of this work, the U.S. Embassy in Cyprus invited UAHT to work in collaboration with the government of Cyprus and provide additional training on human trafficking, building coalitions/partnerships, and technical training to government officials, law enforcement, and health care providers in 2013.
6. Produces effective annual media campaigns since 2008, including multi-lingual billboards, taxi cab signs, airport shuttle signs, and mall signs.
7. Recipient of the 2014 FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award due to our many years of service to the community and, most notably, our 2014 Media Campaign entitled “Let Them Be Heard,” which spanned 17 cities across the state of Texas.
8. Became a member of the Texas Governor's Office of Continuum Care for Child Sex Trafficking Victims, allowing UAHT to advocate for children in the juvenile justice system.
9. Developed the country's first referral database specifically for survivors of human trafficking and their service providers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Victims, survivors, and persons at risk of human trafficking (sex and/or labor) exploitation.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    UAHT has worked directly with trafficking survivors since 2017. In response to feedback and needs expressed by survivors, we began implementing case management services in 2020 and rental assistance in 2021.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    UAHT seeks to disrupt the power imbalance and lack of autonomy experienced by trafficking survivors. Our programs are trauma-informed and survivor-centered to prevent the replication of these potentially retraumatizing dynamics. We actively seek feedback from clients and help them set their own goals for what recovery looks like.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

United Against Human Trafficking
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Against Human Trafficking

Board of directors
as of 1/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Wendy Fong

Chief Gigs


Board co-chair

Mr. Eric Bartz

Big Brother Properties, LLC

Annie Wade

Comcast

Angela Kohl

RectorSeal

Caroline Vetterling

Blazek & Vetterling

Abnet Tsegai-Hurst

Center for Clinical Studies

Chuck Combs

Enterprise Products

Mark Peavy

Resilience Natural Resources, LLC

Tom Kennedy

Global Wealth Advisors

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/04/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.