Gateway Center

Everybody Vs. Homelessness

aka GATEWAY CENTER   |   ATLANTA, GA   |  www.gatewayctr.org

Mission

To connect people experiencing homelessness with the support necessary to become self-sufficient and find a permanent home.

Ruling year info

2008

CEO

Mr. RAPHAEL HOLLOWAY

Main address

275 PRYOR ST SW www.gatewayctr.org

ATLANTA, GA 30303 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-1193832

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gateway Center strives to make homelessness rare, brief, and non-recurring in Metro Atlanta.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Veterans Programs

Veterans Low Barrier Shelter provides short-term beds for veterans who are assessed for services through Fort McPherson. Eligible veterans are transitioned to longer-term residential programs, rapid re-housing, or permanent supportive housing based on needs.

Veterans Contract Beds provides short-term beds for up to 60 days to veterans referred by the VA Office located at Fort McPherson. Veterans receive case management and connected to available services, including mental health, substance abuse support, income benefits, employment opportunities, and housing assistance.

Veterans Transitional Housing provides beds for a maximum of 2 years. This program is a collaborative project funded by the VA office who refers guests from Atlanta’s Homeless Veterans Program to be enrolled in this program. Veterans receive case management and connected to available services, including medical, mental health, substance abuse support, income benefits, employment opportunities, and housing assistance.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Veterans
Men

Assists guests with obtaining economic stability through job training and placement a d bridges the digital divide by providing computer skills education. The CRC assists guests with developing soft skills training, understanding financial management, gaining interpersonal skills, understanding employment expectations, and obtaining sustainable employment at a livable wage. In addition, the CRC utilizes partnerships with local workforce development agencies and businesses to create internships and job opportunities that our guests can participate in, which shapes future careers and inspires them to excel in their personal life as well as in community.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Men
Women

Provides beds for up to 90 days and is a residential addiction recovery program designed to support men in ending their addiction. Guests develop a plan for implementing and sustaining substance abuse recovery and are connected to employment resources and stable housing. Through intensive case management and the utilization of a pre-treatment curriculum, guests remain clean and sober.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Men

Provides beds for up to 90 days for men needing housing and employment case management as they re-enter the workforce. This program addresses systemic factors that may have contributed to guests experiencing homelessness, including educational, legal, and critical life needs.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Men

Assists men who are experiencing chronic homelessness for up to 90 days. Guests have been previously screened by our coordinated entry staff and in the housing queue waiting for a match to be placed into
long-term housing. Cased management services are provided for housing navigations services and linkages to be made to other wraparound services such as substance abuse, mental health, and physical health services.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Men

Diversion is a strategy that prevents homelessness for people seeking shelter by helping them identify immediate alternate housing arrangements and, if necessary, connecting them with services and financial assistance to help them return to permanent housing. Prevention provides tenant-landlord mediation
along with housing navigation support services. Prevention can also provide financial assistance can be used to pay for utilities, a portion of rent and in some case for rental deposits. Short-term rapid exit case management, mediation, and one-time financial assistance to rapidly exit individuals and families from the shelter system within 90 days.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls

Gateway Center launched The Evolution Center (TEC) on December 6, 2017 to address the needs of Atlanta’s chronically homeless in need of a low barrier shelter option. This program provides emotional and physical support for men experiencing homelessness. With funding provided by Partners for Home, TEC addresses the needs of Atlanta’s chronically homeless men who need a low barrier shelter option. TEC is designed to provide rapid access to safe shelter 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Shelter beds are provided to individuals who need it most, prioritizing those who have the highest needs.

Population(s) Served
Men

Serves as a resource center during the day and an emergency response center under special circumstances. While permanent housing is the end-goal for individuals experiencing homelessness, basic human services are critical in building relationships while meeting immediate needs. These services and resources include access to restrooms, showers, storage lockers, telephones, cell phone charging stations, clothing, laundry, hygiene supplies, healthcare (physical and behavioral) services, and referral services (i.e., diversion, ID / Birth Certificate assistance, and employment resources).

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
People with disabilities
Substance abusers
Women and girls
Men and boys

Provides low barrier short-term residential (shelter) for women and children experiencing homelessness. Often, it takes several weeks to find appropriate housing, obtain employment, and ensure security deposits are paid for these women and their children. This program provides wraparound supportive services that include care coordination, intensive case management, behavioral health and substance abuse support, and housing navigation services.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Women and girls
Boys

Provides a coordinated access point to the City of Atlanta and Fulton County’s Continuum of Care, which connects men, women, and families with the most appropriate housing resources to assist them in ending their homelessness. Coordinated entry provides individuals experiencing homelessness with housing
assessments (VI-SPDAT), emergency shelter placements, housing navigation services, and linkage to long-term housing placement options available through the Housing Queue.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Homeless people
Men and boys
Women and girls

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Gateway Center's (GWC) goals are to end homelessness within the greater Atlanta area and provide support and framework for individuals moving out of homelessness to achieve self-sufficiency.

Organizational strategies related to Gateway's goals include: Continuing to improve upon tracking, evaluation, and costing of outcomes to support enhanced assessment, motivational interviewing, and more intensive case management; Building brand upon Gateway's documented successes and enhancing community awareness; Expanding and balancing funding and enhance donor relationships; Enhancing partnerships and collaboration with community agencies; Utilizing more professionals and alumni in volunteering and internships; Implementing a long-term capital improvement and maintenance plan.

Upon Gateway Center's opening, it was well prepared to begin addressing the issue of homelessness in Atlanta. Mayor Shirley Franklin worked with the Regional Commission on Homelessness, United Way, and other partners to pool together the facility, staff, and resources for Gateway. Although designed to primarily serve men, for eight years it operated an emergency shelter for women and families until those functions could be transferred to the City of Refuge in 2013. Since 2005, Gateway Center has served as one of Atlanta's leading partners in the provision of housing and support services for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. The Clear Path program was created in collaboration with Partners for Home in order to provide the initial assessments necessary to quickly place individuals and families experiencing homelessness into shelter and register them for the city of Atlanta Housing Queue. Gateway Center’s Clear Path program continues to serve as a central point of access to the housing continuum for those experiencing homelessness in the city of Atlanta. Coordinated intake and assessment has been recognized as a best practice model by Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Clear Path is the “first stop” for individuals and families seeking housing placement. Gateway Center is led by CEO, Raphael Holloway. He is a community leader often called upon by the city of Atlanta, United Way of Greater Atlanta, and the Regional Commission on Homelessness to lend his leadership, energies, and expertise.

Gateway Center has completed 15 years of service for the most vulnerable citizens of Atlanta. Gateway Center offers different residential programs and services in order to meet the individual needs of our guests including: Veteran support, Workforce Development support, Behavioral Health support, and Addiction Recovery support. Gateway Center provides services and programs for approximately 8,000 unduplicated guests annually. During the most recently finished fiscal year (July 1, 2019 - June 30, 2020), Gateway Center had 1,087 residential guests. 34% of discharges from a Transitional Housing program moved to a permanent housing situation and 10% moved to a temporary housing situation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Individuals and families experiencing homelessness

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    After receiving feedback from our guests regarding challenges in obtaining employment with wages above the poverty line, we began a workforce development program to assist them in obtaining marketable skills training that improves their opportunities to earn a livable wage once they have secured employment through our employment placement partners.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has allowed us to improve and change our programs in order to meet their needs more effectively, which has resulted in their ability to obtain sustainable employment and secure permanent housing.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Gateway Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Gateway Center

Board of directors
as of 08/05/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Edward Hardin

Smith Gambrell Russell

Edward Hardin

Smith Gambrell Russell

Robert Glustrom

RCG Companies

Greg Heston

Ernst & Young LLP

Keith Evans

The Westminster Schools

Cindy LeBlanc

Brewed to Serve

Calvin Ward

Truist

Mary Benton

Alston & Bird LLP

Rayford Davis

Amazon Web Services

Mark Holzberg

Epiphany Dermatology

Kali Franklin

New York City FC

Kimyatta McClary Holder

Modern Health

Will Andrews

The Home Depot

Tammra Credit

The Southern Company

Erica Wright

Project U First

Matthew Keffer

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/5/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/06/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.