Nuru International

Ending extreme poverty, together, one community at a time.

aka Nuru   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.nuruinternational.org

Mission

Nuru International works to cultivate lasting meaningful choices in the most vulnerable and marginalized communities in the world.

Ruling year info

2008

CEO

Mr. Aerie Changala

Main address

2020 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Ste 600

Washington, DC 20006 USA

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EIN

26-1250716

NTEE code info

Rural (S32)

Agricultural Programs (K20)

International Economic Development (Q32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

85% of extremely poor people live in remote, rural areas. Currently, over 50% of people living in extreme poverty live in sub-Saharan Africa and by 2030 that number is projected to rise to 90%. State fragility will be a driving factor in the concentration of extreme poverty, as fragile states are forced to prioritize scarce resources toward security and away from already limited public services.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

International Development

We believe that everyone has a contribution to make toward ending extreme poverty, and that we should be using our resources to do just that. Nuru’s contribution toward ending extreme poverty is centered in areas that are likely to be the last hold-outs for lasting change as the world pushes toward ending this atrocity in our lifetime. We believe that the best way to solve a problem like extreme poverty is to come alongside a community and work together with them for a solution—the best solutions emerge from resourceful local people, and Nuru works to unleash that knowledge so farmers and their families can live a life of opportunity and purpose.

The Nuru Model not only improves livelihoods, but also builds resilience in the communities where it works as well as among the local staff Nuru trains. The Nuru Model is distinctive in its development of a “Sustainability Engine” which employs 1) a leadership development program that restores agency to local leaders and equips them to build and scale poverty-fighting solutions long after the intentional exit of expatriate staff and 2) long term service delivery for all program interventions via farmer organizations or cooperatives. After 5-7 years, Nuru leaves behind a completely self-sustaining impact model owned and operated by empowered local leaders that then expands to additional regions.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2011

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2013

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2015

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2018

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2019

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2020

Kenya: percent increase in crop yield compared to baseline

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Increase in crop yield far exceeds targeted goal. Target: 32%

Ethiopia: percent increase in crop yield compared to baseline

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Increase in crop yield far exceeds targeted goal. Target: 32%

Nigeria: percent increase in income for farmers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Data not available before 2020, as programming had not fully launch

Ethiopia: Percent increase in income for farmers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Nuru is dedicated to cultivating lasting meaningful choices in the most vulnerable and marginalized communities in the world. Ending extreme poverty is more than addressing a lack of money or material resources. It’s about creating an enabling environment where people have the ability to make meaningful choices. Choice is powerful and opens the door to hope, opportunity, change and a better future. Our mission is to build resilience corridors by eradicating poverty and unlocking economic potential within fragile communities in the Sahel to stop the spread of violent extremism by 2030.

Locally-Led:
The best solutions to the problem of extreme poverty come from within the community. Nuru has helped establish successful local organizations in Kenya and Ethiopia and has been able to directly impact thousands of farmers, helping them move from subsistence to farming as a business enterprise. Nuru has helped these farmers build dozens of viable businesses to help connect them to the global market.

Climate Change:
Nuru works together with farming communities to identify nutritious crops that can also be sold commercially. It then trains farmers in best agronomic practices to ensure higher crop yields and farms that will continue to produce over time to build resilience in both households and communities.

Exit Strategy:
Nuru knows that if an intervention really works, our presence will not be needed in a community forever. From day one, Nuru works to develop and strengthen the capacities of local communities so we can work ourselves out of a job and leave communities better than we found them.

Impact:
Nuru helps farmers chart a path out of extreme poverty by helping them improve crop yields, increase income, and build sustainable businesses.

Nuru works in places where many other organizations are either unable or unwilling to go, because we believe we have a part to play in creating a more just and equitable world.
Our team is composed of people who have come from both the Peace Corps and the Marine Corps, from the humanitarian sector and the business sector.

We believe that everyone has a contribution to make toward ending extreme poverty, and that we should be using our resources to do just that.

Nuru’s contribution toward ending extreme poverty is centered in areas that are likely to be the last hold-outs for lasting change as the world pushes toward ending this atrocity in our lifetime.

The Nuru model has already helped nearly 140,000 people begin to lift themselves out of extreme poverty for good. Nuru has exited expatriate staff from two country projects (Kenya and Ethiopia), and equipped a local NGO team with the requisite skills to continue to manage and scale impact to new communities. Nuru exited Kenya in 2015 and Ethiopia in 2018. Nuru recently launched its third country project in northeast Nigeria, and has plans over the next seven years to build 'resilience corridors' to serve approximately 1.7M people living in areas of the Sahel that have increased vulnerability to exploitation by violent extremist groups.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Nuru International is dedicated to eradicating poverty and unlocking economic potential within fragile communities. Nuru serves smallholder farmer households in remote rural areas of Kenya, Ethiopia, and Nigeria. Participants in Nuru programming are rural farmer households that are organized into agricultural cooperatives. Services are offered through local NGOs–Nuru Kenya, Nuru Ethiopia, and Nuru Nigeria–that work with other stakeholder partners to serve farmers through cooperatives. The intended impact is to increase crop yields, food security, income, and healthy behaviors among farmers, to promote sustainable livelihoods and thriving rural agribusinesses.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Human-centered design is part of Nuru’s DNA. Every facet of Nuru’s intervention is designed by, with, and for participants. In rolling out interventions to communities in northeast Nigeria, Nuru launched an intensively facilitated four-month-long process of localized design in 2019. Through multi-stakeholder collaboration, community strengths and needs were assessed and solutions were designed. These activities were implemented over the subsequent years with weekly, monthly, and quarterly monitoring as well as annual evaluation with both quantitative and qualitative data collection. Findings were regularly discussed and pivots in programming were made, including expanding vegetable gardens that focused on food security to cash crop activities for income generation.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback is a critical function to sustaining interventions and reinforcing local ownership over solutions. What we have learned is that sustainability is not doing the same thing the same way forever. Dynamic challenges arise - whether diseases, pests, unexpected seasonal weather patterns, conflict events, or economic factors. Feedback, paired with thoughtful design and bold action, is the mechanism for making a sustainable impact. Sustainable solutions need to change and adapt over time in order to stay relevant, effective, and impactful in the face of dynamic challenges. The presence of a solution alone is not sufficient to tell whether a solution is effective or sustainable. Feedback from participants themselves is the best indicator of continued impact and potential roadblocks.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Nuru International
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Nuru International

Board of directors
as of 6/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. John Hancox

Mountain State Dermatology

Jake Harriman

Nuru International

John Hancox

Mountain State Dermatology

Donald Faul

Athos

Jen Easterly

Morgan Stanley

Kim Keating

Keating Advisors

Beth Van Schaack

Stanford Law School

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/02/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/09/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.