AUTISTIC SELF ADVOCACY NETWORK

Nothing about us, without us!

aka ASAN   |   Washington, DC   |  www.autisticadvocacy.org

Mission

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network seeks to advance the principles of the disability rights movement with regard to autism. ASAN believes that the goal of autism advocacy should be a world in which Autistic people enjoy the same access, rights, and opportunities as all other citizens. We work to empower Autistic people across the world to take control of our own lives and the future of our common community, and seek to organize the Autistic community to ensure our voices are heard in the national conversation about us. Nothing About Us, Without Us!

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Julia Bascom

Main address

PO Box 66122

Washington, DC 20035 USA

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EIN

26-1270198

NTEE code info

Autism (G84)

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (G01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The ASAN Policy Center

The ASAN Policy Center produces flagship memos and briefs on current topics in the federal discussion of progressive disability policy, as well as issue-specific systems change toolkits for advocates which can be used on a local, state, or federal level.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This program, designed for undergraduate students who identify on the autism spectrum and who have a strong interest in the Disability Rights and Autistic Rights movements, is a once a year, week long leadership academy. Participants how to effect systems change in their individual campuses and increase their own skills in self-advocacy and self-help. Alumni receive support and technical assistance in implementing their advocacy goals following the training.

Some years may include a “Hill Day” event, in which participants visit Capitol Hill, discuss how laws are made, and meet with their representatives in Congress. In the past, this event has been held in Baltimore, MD, but has been moved to Washington, DC itself, and allows additional access to our nation's capitol and the opportunities accessible there.

Students must identify as autistic and have at least one year remaining in higher education to qualify, and is open to students with any level of support need so long as the above qualifications are met. Transportation and lodging are provided.

The program is currently made possible with the support of the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation.

Population(s) Served
Students

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network is developing a catalog of publications to benefit our community via The Autistic Press, a micropress serving the cross-disability community. We released the Navigating College handbook in 2011, the Loud Hands anthology in 2012, and both the Empowering Leadership guide for disabled students and an Autism Acceptance e-book in 2013. Additional self-advocacy resources soon to be released include an Employment anthology and a collection of essays on Relationships and Sexuality. More details about each of these publications can be found by following the links below.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Every year on March 1st, the disability community gathers across the nation to remember disabled victims of filicide–disabled people murdered by their family members or caregivers.

We see the same pattern repeating over and over again. A parent kills their disabled child. The media portrays these murders as justifiable and inevitable due to the “burden” of having a disabled person in the family. If the parent stands trial, they are given sympathy and comparatively lighter sentences, if they are sentenced at all. The victims are disregarded, blamed for their own murder at the hands of the person they should have been able to trust the most, and ultimately forgotten. And then the cycle repeats.

Since 2012, ASAN, ADAPT, AAPD, Not Dead Yet, the National Council on Independent Living, the Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund, and other disability rights organizations have come together at local vigils across the country to mourn those losses, bring awareness to these tragedies, and demand justice and equal protection under the law for all people with disabilities. On March 1st, we will come together again, and we ask you to join us.

We’ve also launched Disability-Memorial.org, a memorial to the people with disabilities who were victims of filicide. Active cataloging of cases started in mid-2014; the site contains cases from 1980 to the present.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of manuals produced

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Resources and toolkits

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network seeks to advance the principles of the disability rights movement with regard to autism. ASAN believes that the goal of autism advocacy should be a world in which Autistic people enjoy the same access, rights, and opportunities as all other citizens. We work to empower Autistic people across the world to take control of our own lives and the future of our common community, and seek to organize the Autistic community to ensure our voices are heard in the national conversation about us.
In order to support this mission, ASAN's goals over the next 5 years are:
To support our chapters and grassroots in becoming more sustainable, active, and independent so that they have the resources to advocate for the needs of autistic people in their own communities.

To increase availability of resources in multiple formats and languages to better serve a diverse community of self-advocates.

To increase knowledge of pertinent policy issues among self-advocates at all levels and to support them in exercising their rights as disabled people.

To continue to actively engage in high-impact policy advocacy in order to shape the future of disability policy in the United States, particularly as it relates to: legal capacity and guardianship, community integration, Medicaid, bioethics, subminimum wage and employment, the rights of students, and all areas pertinent to the civil rights and self-determination of people with disabilities.

Goal 1: Strategies to support our chapters/grassroots.
The ASAN Chapter Coordinator will provide ongoing and strategic support to enable ASAN chapters to become more active and grow in size, capacity, and visibility.
The ASAN Chapter Coordinator will support chapters to achieve independent 501(c)3 status and hold local leadership trainings, while also ensuring that new chapters are continuously added to the ASAN chapter network.
ASAN will hold annual leadership academies and increase participation of chapter leaders.
ASAN will use PADSA state plans to guide technical assistance (TA) activities in PADSA (West Coast) states, and these activities to guide overall TA resource development.
ASAN will facilitate regular network building by developing comprehensive and reliable contact lists.

Goal 2: Strategies to increase availability of diverse resources.
ASAN will increase diversity of resource formats, including audiobooks, large print editions, and e-reader versions of print resources.
ASAN will increase diversity and efficacy of resource dissemination methods.
ASAN will create and distribute resources to real-life community hubs.
ASAN will launch and maintain a cross-disability micropress.
ASAN will begin translating all existing and future resources into multiple languages.

Goal 3: Strategies to increase knowledge of policy issues.
ASAN will provide educational materials about key issues in disability policy, including ongoing information on ASAN's disability policy activities.
ASAN's grassroots will participate regularly in state disability policy discussions at the legislative and executive level.
ASAN's grassroots will form and maintain relationships with disability and related organizations in their states.
Members of ASAN's grassroots will be represented on State DD Councils and other state and local policymaking bodies.

Goal 4: Strategies to engage in high-impact policy advocacy.
ASAN leadership will testify at hearings and submit comments on autism research policy.
ASAN will hold a symposium for autistic leaders, researchers, policymakers and other relevant stakeholders to discuss autism research.
ASAN will work to create innovative model legislation related to issues pertinent to our community.

ASAN National is headquartered in Washington, DC, at the center of American policy decisionmaking. We also have 21 US chapters, as well as affiliates and partner organizations in Australia, Canada, Scotland, and Israel that help us in achieving our mission.
Both ASAN National and our chapters engage in grassroots advocacy and systems change. ASAN's national office promotes best practices and provides support/technical assistance through: policy briefs and toolkits, leadership and advocacy trainings, the Pacific Alliance on Disability Self Advocacy (PADSA) and PADSA technical assistance resources, webinars, the Autistic Press and general resource development and dissemination activities. We actively engage our community via these resources, and maintain an active social media presence, websites, blogs, and email alerts.
ASAN has a detailed public policy agenda guiding our engagement in legislative activities. Besides working to influence policy within the federal and state executive and legislative branches, ASAN also files amicus briefs when needed.
Local ASAN chapters engage in individual and public policy advocacy at the levels of local and state government. ASAN's national office supports local advocacy by curating a central knowledge base, facilitating information sharing between chapters and chapter leaders, and hosting leadership academies. ASAN informs the public about the concerns, needs, and issues pertinent to autistic people. We work to translate the results of community-based participatory research into practice through working relationships with researchers and research institutions. We provide accessible information and resources through social media, websites, blogs, television, print and other media, in addition to dissemination via our local chapters and affiliates.

Thus far, we've seen marked improvement in the capability of our PADSA-affiliated groups to advocate on the West Coast and participate in weeklong academies. There has been excellent follow-up with alumni from all of our academies. However, we are still in progress with regards to compiling and centralizing a list of key contacts within this network. We have had to scale back some of our ambitions with regards to launching The Autistic Press this year; however, we still have a few publications in the pipeline, and the conversion of many of our existing publications into eBook and other formats on the horizon. Perhaps the biggest hurdle we face during the period 2016-2017 is developing and implementing a robust and comprehensive fundraising strategy. Fundraising strategy development is currently in progress and should be complete by early to mid fall of this year, and this should enable us to revisit some of the goals we have been unable to achieve thus far.

Financials

AUTISTIC SELF ADVOCACY NETWORK
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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AUTISTIC SELF ADVOCACY NETWORK

Board of directors
as of 02/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Victoria Rodríguez-Roldán

Meg Evans

Ari Ne'eman

Hari Srinivasan

Sarah Pripas-Kapit

Cal Montgomery

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data