PLATINUM2024

MILITARY MISSIONS IN ACTION

aka MMIA   |   Fuquay-Varina, NC   |  www.militarymissionsinaction.org

Mission

Dedicated to assisting Veterans with disabilities, members of the Armed Forces, and their families.

Ruling year info

2008

Founder and Executive Director

Mr. Michael Dorman

Main address

411-B North Judd Parkway, NE

Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-1379308

NTEE code info

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Military Missions in Action is dedicated to assisting Veterans with disabilities, homeless Veterans and members of the Armed Forces, and their families. It is a charitable nonprofit organization which serves five basic needs: 1) provides home modification services to ensure that Veterans with mental and physical disabilities can live independently in their homes; 2) provides furniture and household goods to formerly homeless Veterans; 3) supports active-duty service members and military working dogs serving in combat zones; 4) supports North Carolina homeless Veterans with health and hygiene items, clothing, shoes, and blankets; 5) strengthens the awareness of military children with special needs through social inclusion activities and directly assists with home modifications. MMIA provides services for all 100 counties in North Carolina.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Operation Building Hope

Making homes handicap accessible and providing necessary repairs for safe and independent living for Veterans in need.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Families

Provides new/gently used furniture and household goods to formerly homeless Veterans who have received assistance through the Housing and Urban Development / VA Supportive Housing program. Furniture and household items that have been donated but are not able to be utilized in a small Veteran apartment are sold. MMIA's able to keep 100% of the profits, which allows us to go out and purchase items still needed to complete Veteran deliveries, such as a new mattress or bathroom supplies

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Families

Fill the Footlocker consists of three programs:

1) Supports deployed service members and military working dogs with care packages.

2) Supports homeless Veterans by providing health & hygiene items, clothing, boots, and seasonal items at stand downs throughout the state.

3) Operation Rescue Christmas - providing new toys, gift cards and financial assistance to Veteran or active duty enlisted families in need of support.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

Where we work

Awards

2010 AAAA Edward M. Kennedy Community Service Award 2010

American Association for Affirmative Action

Jawbreaker Humanitarian Award 2010

Jawbreaker Promotions

Best Non Profit 2023

Cary Magazine

Best Non Profit 2022

Cary Magazine

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of health/hygiene product and/or tools of care (mosquito nets, soap, etc.) administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Fill the Footlocker

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide backpacks full of sundry items to unhoused veterans at event all across North Carolina. In the last two years we've attended 24 such events.

Number of clients living independently

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Operation Building Hope

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Home modifications designed to keep veterans and their families living independently in their homes. We've assisted 98 veterans and their families through the program in the last two years.

Number of new clients within the past 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of households furnished

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homes for Healing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We've provided home furnishings to 291 veterans and their famile members in the last two years.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. To provide home modification and handicap accessibility to veterans and their families.
2. To provide previously homeless veterans all the furnishings and equipment for their new apartment/house.
3. To provide homeless veterans hygiene kits and food.
4. To provide service members with care packages each month that contain food, hygiene items, and personal items.
5. To provide disaster relief when needed.
6. To provide toys/food/gifts at the Holiday season to veterans and their families.

Our main goal is to help eliminate homelessness through working with the VA. We want to see our veterans come home to a healthy place of support and love. We want to be a safe place they can call and come to for needs and advice. We want them to not suffer with PTSD alone. Since World War II, the United States has been involved in multiple conflicts and many veterans have experienced the trauma of war and returned home with physical injuries, Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs), and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). These conditions, often combined, make it difficult for our returning service men and women to integrate back into family and community life. Under the best of conditions, government systems can be difficult to navigate, but it can be an overwhelming task for veterans to navigate through the VA system to receive treatments and services that are available to them when they are dealing with PTSD, TBIs and physical injuries. Far too often, a veteran will not find needed support and will become chronically homeless and that homelessness often includes the veteran’s spouse and children. Many of our homeless veterans are still young men and women who need assistance and support in the overwhelming aftermath of their military service on our behalf. Often, they feel guilt and shame because their families have been caught up in homelessness as well.

The MMIA’s Homes for Healing program’s collaboration with the HUD/VASH program is a tangible way to show support and appreciation to veterans and their families for the sacrifices they have made. A furnished, comfortable home is paramount in creating a safe environment for a veteran to pursue a healthier and brighter future. The major goal of the HFH program is to give back to our veterans who have selflessly served the country and help them to feel “at home,” as much as possible. Each apartment receives on an average $2,000 worth of items.

MMIA participates in ensuring future generations of North Carolinian's have the opportunity to prosper is through the multiple volunteer opportunities we have. Many of these can be accomplished by people of all ages, giving everyone a chance to make a difference.

MMIA is not affiliated with any political, religious, corporate or civic entity. We always welcome any group or individual who desires to support our heroes. In addition to Veterans and retirees, MMIA’s volunteer force includes church and community youth/adult groups, Boy and Girl Scout troops, homeschooling, college students, youth fulfilling court-ordered community service, and individual young people.

Staff or other assisting adults work with our younger volunteers to let them know what projects they will be working on and what needs to be done. In making contributions to our Veterans, military members and their families, these youth also are developing result-driven and interpersonal skills that will contribute to their success as adults.

We rely on a small staff and countless volunteers to help reach our mission. We are on the ground working in very tangible ways to ensure that Veterans are not going hungry or without their basic needs being met.

We rely on funding from individuals, churches, civic groups and grants. We have a staff of 5 team members who work in leadership roles over each of these programs. We then rely on our dedicated volunteers who show up day in and day out to pack care packages, fix broken furniture, build wheel chair ramps, pick up donations, deliver furnishings, fix toilets, etc. We really have the most incredible volunteers!

As of Dec 31, 2019:

1. 94 cents of every dollar donated to us, goes to our programs and services
2. Assisted over 58,000 homeless veterans
3. Shipped over 63,100 care packages to our active duty servicemen/women
4. Completed 731 building projects
5. 533 families received furniture and household goods
6. 1,918 children benefited from Operation Rescue Christmas

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Many we serve do not have reliable communication platforms.

Financials

MILITARY MISSIONS IN ACTION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MILITARY MISSIONS IN ACTION

Board of directors
as of 03/07/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Brent Orr

North Carolina National Guard

Term: 2025 - 2024

Brent Orr

NC National Guard

Julie Dillon

Hughes Pittman & Gupton, LLP

Lauren McAndrew

Blanchard, Miller, Lewis and Isley, P.A.

Jason Walters

N-able

Jayson Parish

Density

Paul Pierce

United States Federal Government

Dan Evans

AlliedUniversal

Roger Lush

Alliance Careers

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/7/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/07/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.