FLINTRIDGE CENTER

Relentless Committment, Transformed Lives

Pasadena, CA   |  www.flintridge.org

Mission

Mission: To break the cycle of poverty and violence through community planning, innovation and action.

Vision: A healthy, safe community where families thrive, youth reach their full potential, and equality and opportunity are accessible to all.

Ruling year info

2008

Executive Director

Josh McCurry

Main address

236 West Mountain Street, Suite 106

Pasadena, CA 91103 USA

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EIN

26-1559274

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Flintridge Center's programs focus on adults and youth impacted by incarceration and community violence in Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena. 14% of Pasadena residents live in poverty and the unemployment rate has more than doubled since 2000. The majority of low-income individuals are concentrated in the Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena communities. There are 12 active gangs in Pasadena that frequent schools, community centers and parks, making it extremely difficult for local youth to avoid exposure to gang activity and violence. When individuals aren't given the opportunity to make positive choices, they resort to unhealthy behaviors to make ends meet. California has 171 mandatory employment restrictions for people with felony convictions, and the Center for Economic and Policy Research finds that incarceration can reduce an individual's chance of finding employment by 30%. In LA County, 32.3% of those released from prison will return within three years.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Apprenticeship Preparation Program (APP)

In 2008, Flintridge launched a free training program to prepare former gang-affiliated and high-risk young adults for paid apprenticeships and jobs in the construction trades. The 140-hour course covers the skills and information needed to successfully apply for union apprenticeships. The course includes field trips to construction sites and union training centers, hands-on experience with tools, guest speakers from the construction industry, and a 16-hour life-skills component. The course is accompanied by case management and job development services, which continue for up to a full year beyond graduation. Flintridge Center is the lead agency. Community partners include the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council AFL-CIO, Parsons Corporation, the City of Pasadena, dozens of other community partners, multiple contractors and 16 construction trade unions.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Economically disadvantaged people

Youth of Promise (YOP) is a youth development program serving youth in the Northwest Pasadena and West Altadena communities who have been impacted by poverty, community violence, gangs, and incarceration. Our goal is to see all of our youth finish high school and enter college. We provide them with support, resources and positive alternatives to joining gangs and becoming entangled in the justice system. Our youth live in high-need, high-risk circumstances, but have tremendous potential when they receive support from adults who believe in them. We call them Youth of Promise because when we care for and invest in them, they are full of promise.

YOP provides youth with comprehensive services, including academic tutoring, community service opportunities, life skills workshops, college and career planning, mentoring from caring and supportive adults, and fun and educational field trips and events. Committed volunteers recruited from the Pasadena and Altadena communities serve as mentors, providing emotional support through life's challenges and transitions. Flintridge staff case managers provide advocacy and referrals for youth and their families to ensure that their immediate needs are met.

The results we see go beyond just improved grades — the YOP program leads our youth to healthier relationships and lifestyle choices, improved interpersonal skills and increased self-esteem. We have witnessed youth grow from barely attending class to graduating high school and going off to college. It's amazing what youth can achieve when they are supported and encouraged.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Students

We offer reintegration services for community members returning from incarceration. The reintegration process can be overwhelming, so we provide case management and systems navigation services to help ease the transition between incarceration and the outside. We help community members set goals and make plans, navigate complicated processes to get social services, and complete necessary steps to successful reintegration, such as getting a driver's license, finding housing and employment, paying child support, and much more.

Coordinated by Flintridge Center since its formation in 2010, the Reintegration Network is a coalition of local service providers and public agencies working together to meet the needs of formerly incarcerated individuals returning to our community. Trying to prevent recidivism, the multisector coalition includes the Pasadena Police Department and community-based, faith-based, philanthropic, business, civic and educational organizations. By providing a safety net of effective and comprehensive services and resources for out-of-custody life, the Network seeks to lower the rate of recidivism. The Network's key initiative is the Pasadena/Altadena Community Team (PACT) monthly resource fair. Flintridge Center coordinates these monthly events and follows up with each community member who attends the fair.

Using a dignified and compassionate approach, we seek to help community members meet their needs and leave the cycle of violence, repeating offenses, and poverty. Moreover, with the efforts to reduce recidivism, we are also working to ensure the safety and well-being of our entire community.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

When youth and young adults have encounters with law enforcement, what are their rights? How should they conduct themselves? What questions should they ask? What responses should they provide? How should they respond to requests to search? At Know Your Rights Workshops, volunteer attorneys provide important information, advice and guidance. Youth-serving organizations throughout Pasadena and Altadena may request traiings.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students showing improvement in test scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Youth of Promise Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Youth of Promise Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Youth of Promise Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percentage of clients who return to incarceration after receiving services (recividism rate)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Apprenticeship Preparation Program (APP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Apprenticeship Preparation Program (APP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Flintridge Center's overarching goal is to prevent cycles of incarceration and community violence, which result in intergenerational poverty. We aim to see the community members we serve pursue higher education, secure lasting careers, and obtain the support they need to thrive.

Flintridge Center's programs create positive opportunities for youth and adults impacted by gangs, violence, incarceration, and poverty. We believe that by uplifting individuals that need the most support, we can make communities stronger and healthier for everyone. Our Reintegration programs serve adults leaving incarceration and/or gangs, and include case management, systems navigation, employment development, and life skills. Our Apprenticeship Preparation Program is a 10-week, trauma informed workforce development program that readies formerly incarcerated and/or gang impacted individuals for careers in union construction trades. Our Youth of Promise Program youth development and diversion program serves youth at risk of falling in to the juvenile justice system.

Flintridge Center has been serving Pasadena's most underserved community members for thirty years. Service to the community began with the work of the Flintridge Foundation, which operated as a grantmaker from 1986 to 2007. The foundation planned to conclude its grantmaking programs in 2007, but was informed by community members that deep gaps in youth development and justice-impacted families would emerge in the Foundation's absence. Responding to the needs of the community, Flintridge transitioned to a direct service 501(c)(3) organization focused on preventing and intervening in cycles of community violence, intergenerational poverty, and incarceration. For a full decade now, Flintridge Center and its community partners have provided a continuum of youth development and adult reintegration services for underserved community members.

In 2010, the Pasadena City Council named Flintridge Center as the City of Pasadena's Institutional Home for Violence Prevention/Intervention and Positive Youth Development. Until 2017, we served as a community hub for stakeholders to collaborate on strategies to reduce community violence. In 2017, Flintridge Center obtained funding from the California Board of State and Community Corrections under Proposition 47 to align and strengthen the community's reintegration services to better address the needs of the reentry population. Under a new strategic plan, we serve as the convener and coordinator of reintegration services in the Pasadena and Altadena area – in partnership with Pasadena Police Department, the City of Pasadena Public Health Department, and nine other community-based organizations. For all the formerly incarcerated individuals we serve, only 7% return to incarceration (compared to an LA County rate of 30%). 80% of youth we serve show improvements in behavior. Looking forward, we hope to expand our youth services to children of incarcerated parents, and further align our adult and youth services to create a continuum of care that nurtures the entire family.

Financials

FLINTRIDGE CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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FLINTRIDGE CENTER

Board of directors
as of 4/5/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

James Kossler

Lorna Fitzgerald

VP of American Funds Distributors, a division of The Capital Group Companies

Harry Yohalem

Caltech - Retired

James Kossler

Pasadena City College - Retired

J. J. Tebo

Conexus

Gloria Sanchez-Rico

Huntington Hospital

Alexander Moseley

Ali Barar

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/13/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/24/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.