ANTIOCH COLLEGE CORPORATION

aka Antioch College   |   Yellow Springs, OH   |  www.antiochcollege.edu

Mission

The mission of Antioch College is to provide a rigorous liberal arts education on the belief that scholarship and life experience are strengthened when linked, that diversity in all its manifestations is a fundamental component of excellence in education, and that authentic social and community engagement is vital for those who strive to win victories for humanity.

Ruling year info

2009

President

Jane Fernandes

Main address

One Morgan Place

Yellow Springs, OH 45387 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-1672457

NTEE code info

Higher Education Institutions (B40)

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

Minority Rights (R22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The liberal arts reflected a belief, profoundly influenced by the paradigm changes of the Enlightenment, that education ought to be both rigorous and broad in addressing the whole person rather than preparing them more narrowly for a single profession. Mann believed this, but he also deeply opposed the obscurantism and other prejudices he thought sectarian, religious-based education fostered and, as we know, insisted on developing Antioch along more progressive egalitarian values in service to humanity.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Undergraduate Liberal Arts College

The College awards the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. The general education program includes courses in the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences; global seminars in which students critically analyze global problems through an interdisciplinary study of resources and systems; theme-based writing and quantitative skills seminars; work portfolios, which are courses that are delivered online while students are on cooperative education work assignments; and the senior reflection paper. As they advance in their studies, students declare a major in one of 11 areas of concentration or work with faculty to devise a self-designed major. Coursework in the major builds upon students’ experiences in the general education curriculum while providing students with pathways to deepen their knowledge or further develop their passion in a particular area of study.  All students participate in the cooperative education program, which requires at least four periods of full-time work.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Glen is a Living Sanctuary, forever protected in the memory of Helen Birch Bartlett. It is a Natural Classroom, where students and the public can learn about the environment and how to live with Earth in mind. It is an Outdoor Laboratory, where ecological and environmental research helps us better understand the world around us.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

The newly renovated 44,000-square-foot Wellness Center is now open for the College and the greater community to come together to focus on fitness and health. The center embraces Antioch’s vision of sustainability by being renovated to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards. The facility will operate at 50 percent reduced energy compared to a conventional building of its size.

The Wellness Center features the following amenities: a six-lane, regulation-length indoor swimming with made cleaner and greener with UV filtration system; a large therapeutic whirlpool; a fully equipped fitness room with state-of-the-art cardio equipment, strength machines, weight lifting equipment and a walking track; indoor courts for basketball, volleyball, badminton and pickle ball; studio spaces for group fitness classes, martial arts, yoga and more; two racquetball courts; outdoor tennis courts; large multi-use space for special events, lectures, conferences, retreats and performances; lounge and patio spaces for gathering; and a healthy grab-and-go snack bar.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

The Coretta Scott King Center for Cultural and Intellectual Freedom honors the legacy of Antioch’s renowned alumna Coretta Scott King ’51 by facilitating learning, dialogue, and action to advance social justice. The CSKC is the site of training, Kingian nonviolence workshops, an annual Social Justice Symposium, and other programs and educational initiatives.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups

The Antioch Farm is a working farm and learning laboratory Opens a New Window. located on Antioch College’s south campus. Started in 2011, the Farm includes a two-acre annual growing area Opens a New Window. with a 600-square foot hoop house Opens a New Window. , pasture for animal Opens a New Window. grazing, two acres of food forest Opens a New Window. , and a composting site Opens a New Window. . And it’s staffed mostly by Antioch students.

The Antioch College Farm utilizes ecological agriculture to provide an integrated context for liberal arts learning. The Farm allows students to experience, explore, and develop methods of sustainability, through its interwoven functions as an outdoor laboratory for curricular study and a living forum where student labor connects to campus dining and recycling.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Farmers

The Olive Kettering Library provides a firm foundation for the development of a modern college library to support the mission of the new Antioch College as well as the community.
Students use the library to consult or check out an array of research materials; find a quiet corner to study; interact with faculty, staff, or other students; attend an instruction session; and enjoy the services of a robust online collection of resources made available through strong library consortium relationships. The OKL is a part of the Greene County Library Exchange.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In going beyond the status quo, we orient this new kind of college to a trans-disciplinary vision, informed and aligned with the most current, science-based understandings about the multi-level, quantum nature of reality and what this might tell us about the universe and how we might best inhabit together our one and only Island Earth. This is what we mean by discovering new and better ways of living and learning.

A trans-disciplinary vision is meant to complement and expand upon, rather than to supplant the vital disciplinary, interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary approaches we are cultivating in the academy. By exploring the interstices of the disciplines and what may lie outside of them altogether, we make possible new combinations and forms of knowledge and understanding through the humanities, social sciences, sciences and arts, and we inspire active dialog among them.

A new kind of college does not lead to a weaker commitment to what we sometimes refer to as academic rigor. Care and accuracy in argument are not to be sacrificed nor are the production and use of verifiable data nor clarity of expression and communication. On the other hand, taking an open, respectful, and humble posture towards the unknown, the unexpected, and the unpredictable are equally essential as is broad-mindedness in acknowledging the right to ideas and truths opposed to our own.

At this new kind of college multiple ways of knowing, doing, and being are welcome and experienced. The use of intellect and abstraction are key educational strategies to strengthen and refine, but these are not to be favored exclusively over intuition, sensation, imagination, body movement or other modes of knowing. To accommodate and encourage the fullest complement of these forms and methods, we will develop and model paradigms of thought, organization and action, which are hospitable to critique, dialog, and change.

In order to become the authors of the change we desire in ourselves, in our colleges, and in our world, we must embrace complexity and employ the other principles of resilience in its planning and operational life. In the new American college, therefore, we accept and agree to work openly with, conflict, adversity, mistakes, contradictions, perspectives, values, and beliefs as part of what it means to be human.

Consequently, in our learning, working and living together we will pursue and be mutually supported in the discovery of unities among opposites and bridges to fresh perspectives.

A New Kind of College…
Antioch is A College of Action.
Antioch prepares students to live lives of intention. Students have agency to design their education, to own that education, to govern their college, to collaborate with their faculty, and extend their classroom learning into the real world.

When you become an Antiochian, you don’t just attend a college that has been around since 1850. You participate in a movement rooted in a tradition of breaking boundaries to face the challenges of now.

We are grounded in experiential learning. This is a laboratory college where you learn by doing. From problem-based projects to makerspaces, cultural immersion to worked-based co-op education, you will have the freedom to experiment, try, fail and grow.

We are committed to community. This is a collaborative college, a place where we practice democracy as a part of everyday life. As an Antiochian, you will participate in the design and governance of the college. You don’t just follow the rules here. You help make them.

We are connected to the world. Your education will be presented through the lenses of both local and worldwide community problem-solving. Whatever path you choose, we will work closely with you to help you translate learning into winning victories for humanity.

Horace Mann, first president of Antioch College, was an abolitionist and educational visionary. He was father of Antioch College and of the American public school. We celebrate his role in leading the College and for providing generations of Antiochians with the ethical direction to win victories for humanity.

In the spirit of Horace Mann, Antioch College believes a healthy democratic society requires institutions that act as catalysts for change and laboratories for invention. This is a role that Antioch College has played throughout its history; the effort to restore it is among the most significant and compelling opportunities in higher education today.

Antioch College has been a pioneering and values-driven secular institution since it was founded in 1850. The College was among the first nonsectarian educational institutions in the United States. It was the first co-educational college in the nation to offer the same educational opportunities to both men and women and it was the first to appoint a woman to its faculty and to its Board of Trustees. It was also among the first to offer African-Americans equal educational opportunities. Throughout the generations, Antioch College faculty, students, staff, and alumni have committed themselves to important causes. Consistent with its curriculum of study and work, Antioch College has always given equal weight to understanding theory, to engaging in practice and to taking action.

In the 20th century, Antioch College redefined liberal arts education by initiating an entrepreneurial and experiential curriculum through the development of its hallmark cooperative work program. Many of the now-common elements of today’s liberal arts education – self-designed majors, study abroad, interdisciplinary study, and portfolio evaluation – had an early start at Antioch College. The College was also among the first to make a commitment to community governance and the authentic participation of students in institutional decision-making.

Over the past year, since achieving full, fast track accreditation last July, our full attention has been devoted to developing a framework—which we call FACT (Framework for Antioch College’s Transition)— for designing and building Antioch as that college

Now entering its second year, FACT has utilized a process of participatory envisioning, creating, experimenting and developing to produce the holistic parameters and value proposition for a college that does not currently exist but is very badly needed in the world. As I see it, our most important task together is to build that college.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

ANTIOCH COLLEGE CORPORATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ANTIOCH COLLEGE CORPORATION

Board of directors
as of 07/05/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Shelby Chestnut

Michael Casselli

Antioch College

Shalini Deo

Antonia Dosik

Coco Gagnet

Antioch College

Noah Greer

Antioch College

Shannon Isom

John Jacobs

Craig Johnson

Maureen Lynch

Pamela Martinez-Ibarra

Susan Mayer

Joshua Miller

Antioch College

Sharen Neuhardt

Ace Portis

Emily Seibel

Steven Thurston

Barbara Winslow

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data