LINN COUNTY ANIMAL RESCUE - LCAR Equine Rescue

Speaking for those who can't

aka LCAR-Equine Rescue   |   Lebanon, OR   |  www.lcarhorse.org

Mission

Provide a safe and nurturing environment for abused, abandoned, neglected, and elderly horses; with a lifelong responsibility for the animals we acquire. To find those who are adoptable a healthy, happy, forever home for a 2nd chance at life. To have a safe loving environment for those that are not adoptable and must remain at the facility for life. Offer a safe caring place for hospice dog from Linn County Animal Control, these are older throw away dogs that owners no longer want. They need respect and care in their end of life just like people. These are loving animals that have spent their whole life serving people. We love them and care for them. We work with Linn County Mental Health to offer programs for addiction, developmentally disability, PTSD, with human/animal interaction.

Notes from the nonprofit

Working with Linn County Mental Health, the next to last Saturday of each month there is a time for developmentally disabled individuals to spend time with the support rescue horses. The last Saturday are for those with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. It is a rewarding time for both human and horse. Many of the horses have been thru traumatic experience and also suffer from PTSD. They seem to have a special connection and share the calming gentle time. We are working to expand both these programs. We have expanded our services to include Hospice Dogs. In keeping with our original mission to help animals, LCAR works with Linn County Animal Control to help with the old and forgotten dogs. Its sad when a faithful dog is thrown away because they got old or have out lived their owners and are not wanted by family members. Its hard to imagine how terrible it is to have to die alone and in a cement cage. We offer a warm loving place to live out their lives no mater how short.

Ruling year info

2008

Founder/ President

Ms. Cindy R Orr

Secretary, Treasurer, Grant administrator

Mrs. Bonnie J Orr

Main address

PO Box 2669

Lebanon, OR 97355 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-2147632

NTEE code info

Other Services (D60)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Other Services (D60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Starvation is a terrible problem, there is so many needs. LCAR has chosen to work to help the unwanted and neglected equine. It was a natural calling as we already had a passion for horses. The local law enforcement had no-one to turn to for help with abused and neglect equine. There were no Equine Rescues in the area. The need to help combat animal cruelty is a large one and Linn County Animal Rescue wants to help by offering a safe and caring place for healing and rehabilitation. To throw away dogs when they get old is not acceptable. They need a place to end their life in safety, comfort, being cared for and fed. LCAR offers that place. We try to educate people that a pet is a life time commitment. In working with the underprivileged and developmentally disabled there are many rewards but it takes dedicated volunteers and lots of time and patience. We thank everyone who gives. We have expanded on "Healing Hearts with Horses" program by improving the access to the arena.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adoption to forever home

Adoption Program: Our goal is to rehabilitate the animals to a point it can be adopted out to a forever loving home. There are very strict adoption rules, the last thing we want to do is recycle the poor animal from one bad situation to another. We have an adoption agreement form, adoption form, property inspection, and all parties must have a background check done by the Linn County Sheriff’s Office. LCAR always retains ownership of the horses and they have to be given back if there is a problem, they can not be sold, given away, or bred.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Some of the rescued horses are not adoptable, because of age, or special needs. These horses are life residence of LCAR, they need sponsors to help take care of them. We offer a program when an individual can contribute to the financial care of a life resident.  Even $50 or $100 a month is a great contribution to the care of a horse with special needs. Their care and feed cost more than a healthy horse. The experts say an average healthy horse cost about $10 a day (care only-does not include a place a year). A rescue horses needs quickly increase this to $25 a day.
The person can have a picture and come visit and keep an update on the horse. This program is usually for someone who does not have the space necessary to keep a horse of their own but still want to help.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Offer opportunities for special needs individuals to learn about horses. We work with developmentally disabled, addiction, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, depression, and other problems we have in our communities. This is done thru human/animal interaction. It is a great therapy program with many wonderful rewards.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Economically disadvantaged people

To educate the public about the difference between the "fantasy" of the horse and the "reality " of the horse. Teach respect for all life and understanding responsible care.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Re-feeding starved animals, including humans, is not an easy process. They can develop re-feeding syndrome when they are given concentrated calories, and this in turn can lead to heart, respiratory, and kidney failure usually 3 to 5 day after the initial meal. Immediate needs: water, electrolytes (phosphorous and magnesium), good quality hay (alfalfa), and concentrated complete grain. The process has to be very slow at first. Water (free choice), electrolytes, and hay several times a day. Depending on body condition (each horse needs to be treated as an individual) by 2nd or 3rd day hay free choice. Also 2nd day small amounts of grain ( handful) every two hours or 6/8 times a day. This is repeated with increases slowly in grain, and all the hay they can eat for the first 5 day to a week, depending on the horse. If the animals organs has already shut down they may die in first 3 days. The first 5 to 6 months are critical for nutrition and medical attention to give the horse a 2nd chance to have a decent life. Older horses that have been starved for a long period of time (body score of 1 or 2) may start to recover and gain weight, but if internal organs are too damaged they can not recover and usually die within 6 months. Related health factors, degree of emaciation, and the horse’s response to re-feeding will direct the re-feeding plan. Initial weight gains of one to two pounds (up to five or six) per day would be expected for a favorably responding horses with a body weight between 900 and 1000 pounds.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Horses are great for therapy for humans problems. This program is set up to allow individuals who suffer with PTSD, to have a caring connection with a safe, gentle, non judgmental animal. LCAR is working with the local health department to select needy individuals.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
People with disabilities

Where we work

Awards

Award of Merit 2010

Linn County Sheriff's Award

Certified Peer Support Specialists eligible to work in Addiction and Mental Health Recovery 2018

State of Oregon Certifications

Volunteer award 2019

State of Oregon

Affiliations & memberships

American Humane Association 2009

Humane Society of the United States 2009

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 2012

Points 4 Profit award 2019

Linn County Sheriffs Office 2008

Linn County Sheriffs Office Animal Control 2018

Points 4 Profit Award 2020

Oregon Dept of Ag-license 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals with freedom from hunger and thirst

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Special Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The idea is to be able to decrease the hunger and thirst that haunt animals. To improve human nature and teach respect for all life. To be reasonable to a point of responsible care. To offer help.

Number of animals with freedom from pain

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Special Needs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

To work to stop human cruelty and abuse of animals. To work with Linn County Mental Health to offer programs of horse/human interaction to help both. To offer education and training on how to help.

Number of animals with freedom to express normal behavior

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with psychosocial disabilities

Related Program

Special Needs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The life residents are allowed to be as free and natural as possible. Normal horse behavior is very important in their rehabilitation. Programs to help establish trust thru horse/human interaction.

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with disabilities, People with diseases and illnesses, Substance abusers

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

To rehabilitate the needy animals is the major goal of our rescue. Those that can be are adopted to a forever home. Others become life residence. We also work to offer programs to help our community.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, People with disabilities, People with diseases and illnesses, Substance abusers

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of animals rescued depends on our space and available finances. To be a responsible rescue the number of animals should not be greater than the resources available.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Adoption to forever home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Thru a strict adoption procedure, the aim is to not move the animals from one bad situation to another bad situation. It's not just rehoming the animal, but placing in a forever loving home.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With both short term and long term goals, we want to positively affect the publics attitude about animals and change lives. To accomplish a better Quality of life and understanding, for the public and the animals we share our space with. Help solve the problems in our society, created by unwanted, abused, and neglected equine. Since the beginning of civilization, horses have been vital to human survival. Although their role has changed, they continue to win our hearts and imagination. Horses change lives: they give young people confidence and self-esteem; they provide peace and tranquility to troubled souls: and give all of us hope. The idea is to change the attitude of law makers, law enforcement, and the public itself, including horse owners. So many individuals feel “why bother, its just an animal". But without these animals, what would our world be like? A horse is the projection of peoples' dreams about themselves - strong, powerful, beautiful - and it has the capability of giving us escape from our mundane existence.~(Pam Brown). Thanks to the generosity of individual donors and Foundations grants, LCAR is able to save some of these beautiful creatures that have been abused, abandoned, and neglected. The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated" ~Gandhi. Our all volunteerBoard of Directors work to increase our ability to promote what we do, to the public and ask them to financially partner with us with cash, in-kind donations, and volunteer labor.The aim is to make a difference in the lives of people and animals. Education and compassion are important things for the public to learn and understand. Education is the most powerful weapon which can be used to change attitudes in the world. LCAR offers information that aims to help everyone understand the delicate balance between humans, animals, and nature. It is better for us all when we help each other. The idea is to help everyone understand the needs of the rescued horses and how important it is to report cruelty. The idea is to work with law enforcement and our legislators. "To educate our people, and especially our children, to humane attitudes and actions toward living things is to preserve and strengthen our national heritage and the moral values we champion in the world". ~ John Fitzgerald Kennedy
Sometimes you can accomplish a point by setting an example. education, rehabilitation, and responsible care is a big order. Programs like "Healing Hearts with Horses" brings people and horses together for mutual support. People have PTSD, horses have PTSD. The hands on interaction has a mutual benefit for both. We offer this program for free to our community and surrounding communities. It is hard work but very rewarding to see both the person and animal improve in attitude and peacefulness.

Stop Animal Cruelty: Thru Education / Rehabilitation and Responsible Care. To have a capable facility with the knowledge to rescue, offer a second chance to the horses, caring place for hospice dogs, and offer relief and education to the public. Located on 53 beautiful acres in rural Linn County Oregon, 5 building, 42 stalls, indoor arena for programs, indoor and outdoor kennels. With knowledgeable dedicated volunteers, who work to care for the injured and neglected animals. Bring people and animals together to help each other. Increase Board capacity for Fundraising, create annual fundraising goals and budget to maintain 30 horses and 16 dogs at the facility. Secure funding to meet necessary goals. Work to increase; our ability to promote what we do; work with the public to financially partner with us (with cash, in-kind donations, and volunteer labor). Fundraising events, grants, donations, endowments, exchange of services, rental parking space, boarding, sponsorship, beneficiary life insurance/wills, Mix of short term and long term outcomes, measurable progress in numbers. As a 100% volunteer managed and 100% donation funded rescue, the biggest challenge is generating enough financial support to substance our important programs. Re-evaluate some of our funding events to determine if they produce enough funding to make them worth doing. As a results, we have dropped some events and are exploring other events and funding sources such as: increasing the number of boarded horses as well as increase the charges to create some stable sustainable funding sources. Conduct “mini" brain storming sessions to explore other new ways to raise and create revenue. Education to help discount the rumors, misunderstandings, and fads, that seem to influence public attitudes. The strategies we offer includes: presentations to service groups; classes to teach the young to care about all life; booths at events with brochures and pamphlets full of helpful information; open correspondence with law makers and legislators to help them make proper and enforceable laws. Educate to correct the situations that produces such a devastated, depressed creature as an abused neglected animal. A special re-feeding program, abrupt re-feeding can cause dysfunction of the body's metabolic systems. LCAR feeds according to the individual horses needs. Re-feeding of a starved horse must start out slowly, from a hand full of concentrated grain to 25 pounds, a handful of hay to an unlimited supply. Hopefully we get the horses before their internal organs have shut down to a point they can not recover. The question is not Can they reason? Nor Can they talk? But Can they Suffer?
Bring humans and animals together with a mutual understand of the needs of all living things. To understand we need each other, to care for a chosen animal is a life time project. The interaction between people and horses is a proven benefit of mental and physical health for both.

LCAR facility was built from with heart and determination, always keeping the needs of the horses and community in mind. A capacity of around 35 animals, we have cared for 73 animals at one time after a big seizure. Resources were stretched past anything we had ever done, but it meant life or death for the horses. With dedication and faith, we survived and so did most of the horses. Will lots of support from different agencies: HSUS, Linn County Sheriff's Office, local veterinarians (especially Ben Braat DVM), Foundations; SummerLee, ASPCA, American Humane, and the community, we were able to work together for the welfare of the rescued animals. Capable volunteers worked double time to give the horses a chance. Some taking turns sleeping in the barn for a 24 hour vigil for the most critical of the bunch. We had IV's hanging rom the rafters and dedicated one end of the barn to intensive care. It was a very hectic but rewarding time, the financial struggle was day to day. Another seizure involved: LCAR, LCSO, BLM, HSUS, Light House Sanctuary, local veterinarians, dog control, SafeHaven, 15 horse trailers, and 20 volunteers. It was an all day job as the owner had turned some of the horses loose rather than let them be saved. LCAR had 6 volunteer riders on horseback rounding up loose horses in timber companies property. It was very much a coordination effort between LCAR and LCSO. A long day but all the horses seized were saved, including 3 in critical condition. LCAR took 11 of the worst horses, others went to BLM and Light House Sanctuary, SafeHaven and Dog Control took the dogs. A great effort of working together to help the animals.Four dedicated volunteers (1 man, 3 women) put the tin roof on a 120 by 36 stall addition to have a dry place for the horses. Almost all (90%) of the labor to build all the structures has been done by volunteers. Capable individuals care for the welfare and healing of the horses under the direction of local veterinarian (Ben Braat DVM). An active board handles the marketing and fundraising for financial support by reaching out to the public, business, service groups, events, and grant foundations.
It was a natural step to add the "Healing Hearts with Horses" programs. With help from the Linn County Mental Health Department we were able to set up a unique program involving addiction, developmentally disabled, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and other problems for individuals to have a healthy interaction with animals. It has had great results and we hope to expand in the future.
Working with other non profits like KATA, Safehaven, Hand in Hand, and Points 4 Profit. 10 key volunteers: 350 years horse experience; 50 years medical experience; 98 years office experience; 20 years management. A great passion for needy animals and humans make all the work worthwhile.

A work in Progress, 2008 to 2022 from a cow barn no stalls to 7 buildings with 36 stalls, a separate hay barn, indoor arena, two tractors, and other farm equipment. 100% volunteer managed and 100% donation funded. Thanks to grants and public donations the operation went from a $6000 family operation trying to help needy horses to a $100,000 operation offering different programs dedicated to; the welfare of the animals, the education of the public to responsible ownership, the fight against animal cruelty, and programs to help interaction with us all. A successful re-feeding program. LCAR has been built by volunteers with sheer determination, hard work, a love for animals, and a dedication to make a difference. The number of needy horses went from 7 to working with 35/50 on a daily bases. The progress has not been easy and there have been a lot of setbacks, if not for the strong will of Cindy Orr and her compassion for the injured, neglected, aged, and abandon horses, LCAR would not have survived. The reward is knowing the 450 plus needy animals that has been treated thru the facility (some still here) received the best of care and attention. Each animal that is saved, rehabilitated, and allowed to continue life with a loving family or as a life resident, is a victory. The before and after pictures in the horses files says it all.
2014 thru 2022 has been a time of growth and upgrades. We got that dependable tractor thanks to Grants and individual donations. We have a very dedicated board. Stats say over 70% of Non Profits don't make it the 1st year, and of those that do make the first year over 70% don't make it 5 years. LCAR is happy to be working on our 14th year. There have been lots of bumps in the road, lots of learning, and many animals saved. The passion to help the needy animals and our community is shared by all the volunteers.
We have made great progress with the programs offered to the disabled and needy in the community. Our participation was really growing till the virus took charge of shutting down the whole state. We hope to be able to get back into full swing with the programs next year. To help the needs of any living creature is important.
"Those who bring sunshine into the lives of others, cannot keep it from themselves." The rewards of our programs came be seen in the faces of the individuals, The happy laughter of a young man that has never touched a horse before or the happiness of a person in a wheelchair being able to sit beside a horse and have a hands on experience. The work is very hard but it is very rewarding to see the happiness in the eyes of the those involved, so many tell about the past joys that have been forgotten and now brought to life.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Most of the people we interact with are in Linn County, however a couple of care facilities come from nearby Marion County and participate in our "Healing Hearts with Horses" program. Our goal is to help fill a need in our community for abandon and neglected animals, plus serve those that have limited options available. We do not discriminate against anyone in connection with their choices of gender, religion, color, nationality, politics, or any personal choices. We do like individuals that care for animals and people. Our volunteer system and offered programs are free and open to anyone who cares. We offer training in our volunteer system to educate and help them understand the complicated communication system of animals. We are not a riding academy and do not offer riding lessons.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email, word of mouth,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are conducting a request for new volunteers, so after the orientation we send thank You note for feedback. We followup with a conversation if there ate any questions and suggestions to improve. Suggestion box. A special website for the volunteers so they can discuss duties and share the sign up schedule. There is a daily sign up sheet at the facility to help keep trace of each persons volunteer hours. These hours are turned into a special organizations that awards volunteer hours by send us metals for each volunteer that qualified. We then have a BBQ at the facility to honor and get feedback on the activities we offer.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It seems the feedback offers them a chance to seem more a part of the success and improvement of our organization. As a mater of fact the idea of "Healing Hearts with Horses" came from a volunteers suggestion of a "Hug a Horse" event. No one person can think of all the possibilities available to help improve and update our organization. Volunteers are one of the main forces that make LCAR a success. Asking feedback from our local farmers, contractors, and business owners helps us with the design and improvement of our facilities. This year we were able to convert our grain system from buying the grain in sacks to go to bulk purchases. This was all accomplished by ideas from a volunteer and a contractor. It is working great and dropped our grain bill by 60%. Fantastic!!!

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

LINN COUNTY ANIMAL RESCUE - LCAR Equine Rescue
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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LINN COUNTY ANIMAL RESCUE - LCAR Equine Rescue

Board of directors
as of 02/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cindy Orr

founder LCAR

Cindy Orr

Founder and president of LCAR

Bonnie Orr

retired office manager

Richard Little

retired professor

Karen Little

retired nurse

Laurie Smouse

retired business owner

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/26/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/25/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.