FOOTPRINT POSSIBILITIES

Do a Lot with a Little FAST!

aka Footprint   |   Saint Petersburg, FL   |  http://www.footprintpossibilities.org/

Mission

a. Its mission includes organizing and seeking funding for communities of need, both in Panama and other international points of interest. These efforts range from construction to educational opportunities and events that engage the community with the environment, children, cultures, health and education. Mentor, monitor, host, coordinate and supervise program development and project execution including logistics planning, procurement and control. Serve as a point of contact for and local agent of US based student organizations wishing to work in Panama.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are small, but driven. Results include, whether on return to our sites we see a community using, maintaining and operating what was donated correctly, safely and for the good of the majority. Community capacity remains the overarching goal and will always be the weak link in the chain of events that lead to renewable projects and success. Footprint strives to not abandon investments in communities of need and returns repeatedly to determine long term effectiveness of its work. Multiple outside agencies are brought in and solutions provided in the past are maintained, expanded and extended to additional users, for the benefit of all community members.

Ruling year info

2008

President

Mrs Nancy Field Montanari

Vice President

Mr Riziero Fernando Montanari

Main address

125 12th Ave North Unit B

Saint Petersburg, FL 33701 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-2354591

NTEE code info

Community Coalitions (S21)

Citizen Participation (W24)

Management & Technical Assistance (R02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We need financial assistance and funding for projects from outside entities. Our Programs are listed in our Profile entry. At present Footprint is self-funded. This limits the scope of work we can accomplish. Since 21Apr08 Footprints has found and supports local community citizen associations with technical support, funding and coordination for infrastructure improvement. These efforts are to enhance general health and provide sustainable platforms for increased educational and cultural opportunities. Cultural events are all local, but can include trips to the USA for educational outreach as well as regional trips to broaden our base of understanding. Starting 2019 Footprint has entered into agreements with NGO and other non profit entities outside of Panama. These organizations found Footprint on the Web and asked for assistance. Help was provided in the form of distance coordination, mentoring, monitoring and professional services. Services focus on engineering design.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

San Francisco Sect 3 EWB UC Berkeley: 5 Year Program Completion

Work To Be Done

In 2020, IDAAN, community members, and local government came together to connect existing water distribution systems in El Valle de San Francisco, Panama to a larger gravity-fed distribution system connected to a large storage water site(PRODEC). The India and Pollo systems that EWB-UCB, FPP, and the communities in Sector 3 have constructed over the last four years are now connected to this larger system and require maintenance work and improvements in order to function reliably.

FPP will see to the implementation of enhanced measures to improve the functionality and longevity of the Pollo and India systems, and construct erosion and pressure failure preventative features.

FPP is responsible for overseeing the construction of all possible items, ensuring the safety of hired workers, and ensuring all built items are safe for intended usage as well as safeguarded against accidents.

FPP will obtain the final prices for the items listed on the bill of materials and confirm these with EWB-USA prior to purchase.

FPP will purchase all materials listed on the bill of materials using funds given by EWB-UCB and inform EWB-UCB before altering the bill of materials.

FPP will hire and ensure the timely compensation of skilled workers for the amount of time specified on the bill of materials.

FPP will store all project materials in a secure location when not in use and ensure that all materials are counted before and after construction in order to track material inventory for future work.

FPP will record GPS points of each new addition to the system and share with EWB-UCB.

FPP will provide accurate dimensions of the system post completion to EWB-UCB to inform as-built drawings.

Population(s) Served
Families
Indigenous peoples

1. Census- Interview with communities interested in the recycling program. Verify waste collection infrastructure.
2. Generate a list of materials needed to build a collection center in each community.
3. Bid for purchase. Payment, warehouse delivery, inventory and dispatch preparation.
4. Tender for the purchase of manual toilet press. Closing arrangement, freight payment, reception, assembly and delivery to each press community.
5. Open RECIMETAL accounts. Create file for each community. Check which RECIMETAL scale generates Albaran (scale printout) as proof of delivery.
6. Promotion, technical market, corporate presentations.
7. Promotion, technical market, Governmental presentations.
8. Program start-up. Opening; promotion, advertisement, press. Program start.
9. Collection, delivery, verification, delivery of monthly Albaran to each community, with a breakdown of each type of recycled material. Fences upgrade.
10. Close first year. Promotion, technical market. Event. Presentation to the people. Determination to continue / expand the program.

Population(s) Served
Families
Multiracial people

Components/description of the project:

The proposed project is based on Education Sector Performance Report (ESPR) 2017, which has been facilitated by Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition (GNECC). The implementing organization Child Survival Aid Ghana (CSAG) was one of the partners in the ESPR study in District and covered two districts and explored the ground realties of accessibility and adaptability of primary education among the children from reading, writing and basic arithmetic skill level along with stakeholders level participation in ensuring quality primary education for all children from 6 to 14 years age group.

A small glimpse of Education Sector Performance Report 2016 – North Tongu District is given for justifying the importance of this project as the call of hour –

• Out of 19 schools in North Tongu district, primary school constitutes the majority;
• CSAG has visited Five (5) Primary Schools during ESPR Survey 2017 and met
• approximately 40 school going and non-school going children along with their parents, school teachers and villages community members;
• CSAG found that 25.2% children were unable to read small paragraph with short sentences at Class II to V level;
• CSAG found that 59.2% children were unable to read a ‘Story’ text with some long Sentences at Class II to V level.
• CSAG found that 26.1% children were unable to calculate 2 digit subtractions with
• borrowing at Class II to V level.
• GNECC found that 75.2% children were unable to calculate 3 digits divided by 1 digit at Class II to V level.

• In view of the above facts and figures, a library based accelerated reading project introduced for two years duration mainly for children of 6 to 14 years age group in North Tongu District will be helpful.

The proposed project is indented to set up ten (10) community owned children Libraries in ten (10) villages for scaling up two (2) Reading Classes per village for 30 children every day. The Reading Classes will be either ‘Ghana Education Service’ or Learning to Read (Learning to Read) classes or one of each depending on the local needs. These will be started to impart / enhance reading skills for beginners/under-performing children.

The project also plans to involve community-based organizations, school teachers, village education committees, parents and other important stakeholders in the program for children who have the serious difficulties in access to quality primary education. The multi- stakeholder approach will ensure a combined sustainable effort for making complete reading villages.

In each village, a community mobilization meeting will be held by CSAG team members with the village community members, and all village elders, where children will also be invited, the issue of primary education will be discussed, and CSAG will impress upon the village elders on the virtues of primary education for all round community progress. At the meeting the location of the village library will be decided. This will be done in full collaboration with important stakeholders in the community. The location of the library could be in a Local Youth Club, Local Village School or any other public place of attraction where patronage will not be jeopardized.

To embark on the project, two (2) village volunteers per village will be selected in consultation with the village elders, who will be subsequently trained to run all afore- mentioned learning to Read modules including Library. The training will be Village Level training where all volunteers will be present. The modalities will be worked out at a later date.

The Village Libraries will be the first priority. Prior to the launch of the project, a village survey will be conducted and all children will be assessed on their reading ability which will form the Baseline Test. Depending on the local requirement any or all the Learning to Read modules will be introduced, after 1 month of the launch of the village library.

The proposed program will be community based both in and out of school with children. Both the library and the classes will run according to their convenience. All classes, apart from the libraries, will have one (1) volunteer teaching 25 children, maximum.

Mid-Term and Final Test will be conducted at different times with the same set of children, depending on the module they are in.

Population(s) Served
Families
Multiracial people

Support Two Programs:

1. Historical Documents Capture; Saint Mary's Parrish, Balboa Panama

About the Organization
Affiliated with Engineers Without Borders, Footprint Possibilities strives to improve basic health conditions through community outreach and the supply of healthy foods and vitamins to those unable to afford them. Access to clean water and disposal of wastewater are other key focuses. Footprints Possibilities finds and supports local community centers and meeting centers with technical support, funding, and coordination for infrastructure improvement in order to enhance general health and provide sustainable platforms for increased educational and cultural opportunities. This year, Footprint Possibilities is partnering with St. Mary’s Parish, located in Panama City. The Parish is the Episcopal See of the Archdiocese of Panama – work on the Cathedral Basilica of St. Mary began in 1688, and was not completed until 108 years later.

About the Project
This Parish celebrated its 100th birthday in 2014, but it has historical records that predate the Republic of Panama; they are literally filed and stored in their offices. Its urgent for the office of the Parrish to get these records captured electronically as there is always a fear of catastrophic loss. The historical value of the archives cannot be appreciated until the data is captured. In many instances the Parish served these early colonial areas as a quasi-government entity and future researchers can make use of this data base in their efforts to explore early Panamanian rural life.

The Parish has need for someone to develop a database, recommend a platform, and begin data capture of these records. Funding is available for procurement of software or hardware if needed. The records are all handwritten, many in binders and all in (stunning) script. There is some data capture involved in this project, but it would be in line with demonstrating entry and fine tuning the solution proposed, as opposed to bulk data entry. More important for this project is the development of a database that will store the information, along with a link to the image of the certificate, book, page, or original document in question. The goal for the project is therefore not to finish the capture, but to structure the database, start the capture, demonstrate, train and then turn over the effort to a follow-on team. Footprint Possibilities would be part of this team to assure its sustained over time until the capture is complete.

2. Virtual Museum Tour: El Cano Foundation, Cocle Panama

The project name is “Virtual Tour of the El Caño Archaeological Park and Museum”.
It would entail creating a tour that would be housed on website and would be from the viewpoint of a visitor walking through the park and the museum. A virtual tour is the simulation of an existing location with the help of sequential videos or still images. Other multimedia elements like music, sound effects, floor plans, etc., could also be used.

This project is different from the self-guided tour application created by WPI students in 2019 in that virtual tour will let you “walk” from each point to each point and “see” the park and every item in the museum. The self-guided application requires you to be present in front of each item, especially the museum, and read the information in the app and look at the artifact. The application does not include individual photographs of each artifact on exhibit, just an overview photo of each exhibit window.

If the students can construct an addition “virtual exhibit room” we can add more displays. They would need to photograph and measure the physical museum in order to create a virtual version, requiring them to be in the park.

For this project we do have a need of people with graphic and computer skills to help us with a project. The students would need to spend sufficient time at the park to take needed photos, videos and measurements for GPS coordinates as needed to make the program reasonably user friendly and realistic. We are open to the specific layout and design. High definition cameras would be needed to create the virtual tour. There are currently reasonably priced 360-degree virtual reality cameras available. Fundación El Caño is willing to reach out to their contacts to determine if one may be available for the students to utilize.

The deliverable for this project would be a program loaded to our website that is of sufficient quality and detail to allow someone clicking on it to be able to see the park and museum from the comfort of their home. This program will need to be in both English and Spanish at a minimum. The information text is already available in both languages.

If time permits, when creating the tour of the museum, we would like to have a blank template of the museum created that would allow us to add exhibits as desired. This would enable us to virtually exhibit artifacts we do not have the space for. Below is a link to our database where the students can see what kind of artifacts there are and the information we have on each item.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Catholics
Indigenous peoples

FPP San Lorenzo SSF Maintenance Site Visit

Four years ago the Mayor of the city of Panama requested that Footprints go to this village. The purpose was to improve the 5.7 Km aqueduct which supplied water to a filter. The filter was empty at that time and not working. The University of Reno Nevada visited the site and over the course of three years along with FPP rebuild the filter. It had been working until about 4 months ago.

Unauthorized and uncoordinated alterations to the piping Network were made. The in-line chlorinator’s were no longer connected to supply treated water to the storage tank. Notwithstanding, a yearly cleaning of the bio filter in the slow sand filter was needed. In addition maintenance to the filter manifold and fencing closure were required. For this purpose Footprints mobilized its supervisor and performed maintenance and re-work over a four day period.

The bio filter layer (the top 100 mm of the sand bed) was cleaned and replaced. This filter is made of manufactured sand. The sand is extremely difficult to make and expensive in its investment of time. This filter was cleaned all debris removed and it was returned for service. The water tank pipe manifold had been damaged by repeated entry. This was also repaired and reanchored to the wall. The tank enclosure fencing had openings and these were sealed to prevent unauthorized access to the control valves. All the chlorinator’s were reconnected, refilled with chlorine tablets and the system was returned to operation.

Community fountains were inspected for chlorine content. Water has been chlorinated again and both the homes connected to the network and the community fountains show its presence. The system has been returned to operation again. Footprints is pleased to conduct these activities annually. We work with the community to make sure that changes to their system are not made without contacting Footprints first. Hopefully this is better understood. We look forward to continued work on this important program.
201121 FPP San Lorenzo SSF Maintenance Site Visit

Four years ago the Mayor of the city of Panama requested that Footprints go to this village. The purpose was to improve the 5.7 Km aqueduct which supplied water to a filter. The filter was empty at that time and not working. The University of Reno Nevada visited the site and over the course of three years along with FPP rebuild the filter. It had been working until about 4 months ago.

Unauthorized and uncoordinated alterations to the piping Network were made. The in-line chlorinator’s were no longer connected to supply treated water to the storage tank. Notwithstanding, a yearly cleaning of the bio filter in the slow sand filter was needed. In addition maintenance to the filter manifold and fencing closure were required. For this purpose Footprints mobilized its supervisor and performed maintenance and re-work over a four day period.

The bio filter layer (the top 100 mm of the sand bed) was cleaned and replaced. This filter is made of manufactured sand. The sand is extremely difficult to make and expensive in its investment of time. This filter was cleaned all debris removed and it was returned for service. The water tank pipe manifold had been damaged by repeated entry. This was also repaired and reanchored to the wall. The tank enclosure fencing had openings and these were sealed to prevent unauthorized access to the control valves. All the chlorinator’s were reconnected, refilled with chlorine tablets and the system was returned to operation.

Community fountains were inspected for chlorine content. Water has been chlorinated again and both the homes connected to the network and the community fountains show its presence. The system has been returned to operation again. Footprints is pleased to conduct these activities annually. We work with the community to make sure that changes to their system are not made without contacting Footprints first. Hopefully this is better understood. We look forward to continued work on this important program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Two projects 2020:

1. Kuna Nega (KNG) Septic Tank Construction Program:

Program Description
Kuna Nega was incorporated in Panama as a indigenous community in 1986. The community is platted and formally registered with the Panamanian government. Its home to 2500 inhabitants. Footprint Possibilities Inc has been sustaining projects and implementing programs in this area for over 7 years. One project completed in 2017 was the design, construction, start up and hand over of a potable water distribution network. The network included 3 storage tanks of 20,000 gallons each. Kuna Nega has adequate distribution and storage of potable drinking water. This water is provided by IDAAN the Panamanian National water authority. Kuna Nega (KNG) does not have a municipal sewer connection. Homes were outfitted at various times with single family septic tanks. In general these are never serviced and when full they are abandoned. Presently sewer is either disposed of on the surface as runoff, or its piped in the local waterways where its washed downstream. With the introduction of a reliable and consistent supply of water into homes the need to handle the grey and black outfall is urgent. Footprints has built 5 septic tank installations in the community; all are working to this day. Three (3) are multi family, one located at the community center, one at the Catholic Church and Children’s Cafeteria and one at the KNG Association meeting hall, senior lounge and office facility. These tanks have not reached the point where they need to be serviced by truck and have sludge pumped out.

Major Task Breakdown

Task 1: Topography; determine the layout and topography of the community inside its established polygon. Identify Sectors and in each locate septic tanks with absorption pits to service 3-5 families. Assure all sewerage flows by gravity; no Lift Stations.

Task 2: Design; provide a design; produce a Conceptual, Intermediate and Final Design for the network. At each milestone conference with key stakeholders, explain progress, collect input, revise and proceed to the deliverable work product. Minute all conferences.


Task 3: Final Design package; provide a final design report. The package should include a Final Design Report, Final Design Drawings, Bill of Materials Breakdown, Project Program, Equipment Specifications and a DRAFT O&M Manual.

Task 4: Education Stakeholder/ By-in/ Community Vote; with the Final Design hold community meetings. Coordinate with the office of the Mayor and local elected representatives. With their expected support educate the local community on the benefits and positive impacts from proceeding with the handover of this utility to their Association. Hold a vote and transfer future construction, operation, maintenance and servicing of the multifamily septic tanks to the KNG Association.

2. CSAG Child Survival Adie Ghana: Water Sourcing Storage and Distribution Program

Program Definition

The main problem of the project communities is the poor health of its people. In the absence of reliable and accessible potable water supply and effective sanitation facilities in the identified communities, the rate of death associated with the ten most common diseases, which are preventable, has increased steadily in the last 5 years.

Infant mortality rate is presently high. Seven 7 out of every 10 deaths result from diseases such as Malaria, Severe Diarrhoea and Upper Respiratory Track infection. The high rate of deaths associated with these preventable diseases is now a major concern to all stakeholders in the District.

“Poor Health” in this context means being impacted by general lack of infrastructure in the communities. This is notable in faecal matter of both humans and animals on the ground surface, their joint use of the same source of water and the inability to collect, transport, store and treat raw water to potable standards. Low awareness about these problems and the misperceptions of the target population about their causes and their effects on the health of the community still remain as a major problem. For example, cultural practices in some of the communities continue to be a hindrance to the campaign to provide treated drinking water for the people in these villages. Notable among them is the beliefs that water from streams are “thicker” and “tastier” than that taken from “pipe and wells” with pumps. Communities also believe that water from streams has “carried” their ancestors from creation to the present generation and so they are reluctant to depart from them, or accept that treated water is an acceptable substitute. In this regards, beyond the technical aspects of the design, an educational campaign is needed to promote the benefits of ‘treated’ water over its natural counterpart.

Major Task Breakdown

Potable Water System

1. Verify user base; establish the population count, gender, age and location.
2. Mapping of user base; provide GPS coordinates for the village. Map out polygon for community, streets, common ways, utility locations, and community property.
3. Clarify source of water; determine sources of water. Require a minimum of 3 options. Include pumped wells as a solution. Provide GPS coordinates for each. Test inflow rate (lph) and water quality for each source. Identify and exclude sources that are not sufficient in flowrate.
4. Routing for pipeline; for each source identify the route of pipeline. Map the route with GPS. Assure pipeline does not cross into private lands.
5. Identify storage location; determine where the community water storage tank will be constructed. Assure land is available and is public. Provide GPS coordinates for up to 3 options.
6. Overlay survey data; place results of educational survey as GIS overlays to the mapping work products. Show locations of homes, current utilities and any other natural feature. Show all community or public buildings.
7. Determine water treatment method; based on water testing propose 3 alternatives to treat water. Provide a cost benefit analysis with a final cost proposal that includes life cycle costs of maintenance and operation.


Sanitary Treatment System

1. Verity points 1 and 2 of Potable Water; determine accuracy and applicability of data collected for potable water system. Adjust as needed.
2. Topography of polygon; determine the topography of the village. Identify areas to locate multi-family septic systems that will serve 5-7 homes. Assure access to tanks via light truck for future service.
3. Determine water treatment method; propose 3 alternatives to treat water. Provide a cost benefit analysis with a final cost proposal that includes life cycle costs of maintenance and operation.


Deliverables

1. Provide a design; produce a Conceptual, Intermediate and Final Design for the network. At each milestone conference with key stakeholders, explain progress, collect input, revise and proceed to the deliverable work product. Minute all conferences.
2. Final Design package; provide a final design report. The package should include a Final Design Report, Final Design Drawings, Bill of Materials Breakdown, Project Program, Equipment Specifications and a DRAFT O&M Manual.

Population(s) Served

MOU FPP-OCL Olotepesi Comp Ltd Kenya

International Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into as of 25Oct20, by and between Footprint Possibilities Inc, a 501C3 Private Charity EIN 26-2354591 (known jointly herewith as FPP) and Oletepesi Company Limited, Kenya (known jointly herein as ENTITY,or OCL) (Appendix 1 –OCL Certificate of Incorporation).

FPP’s mission is “to collaborate with other NGO groups, like-minded organizations, and sponsors to improve the quality of life of communities of need through education and implementation of sustainable engineering projects, while creating new experiences for engineers, engineering students, and similarly motivated non-engineer volunteers.”

ENTITY mission statement states; “Olotepesi exists to improve the lives of those living in poverty in Kenya.” Its VISION statement states; “Olotepesi exists to improve the lives of those living in poverty in Kenya.” AIMS include; “To make a permanent difference by providing sustainable clean water to impoverished local communities and offer educational, consultative and promotional assistance.”

Both organizations agree to work together to serve as a conduit for the transfer of resources and knowledge from available sources to their respective communities in support of sustainable solutions to their short and long term needs.

Additionally both organizations support community driven programs. Communities, via the ENTITY, develop their own list of priority needs and FPP responds to that list. It is not our joint desire or goal to force technologies or assistance onto any community that does not want it or does not have the capacity to sustain it.

Therefore, both parties agree as follows:

Article 1.0 - Where logistical and geographical considerations allow, FPP will provide ENTITY with the following administrative and technical support:

1.1 Fundraising Support: Raising funding via FPP web site, marketing, stakeholder contact, or other venue, in support of projects and programs jointly selected. Transfer of funds raised shall be covered and detailed by amendment to this MOU and receipt and accounting shall be the sole duty and responsibility of ENTITY. FPP shall use its best efforts to fund raise for pre-selected programs and projects and shall retain 10% of gross funds raised as administrative costs; the balance shall be transferred to ENTITY from which all levees, duties, taxes, fees and transfer costs shall be deducted, as required by transfer policies, regulations and processes.

1.2 Qualified Engineering Support: Qualified engineer staff members who have the capacity to assist the ENTITY with technical support throughout the project lifecycle. This support can include conceptual, or final design of engineering projects which are within the scope of work available from FPP stakeholders, or volunteers. At the onset of each project, FPP and ENTITY will work together to determine the amount, expertise, and availability of such engineering support understanding that each program, each community, and each engineer volunteer are different. If provided, each engineering program or project shall have its own MOU in which the duties, roles, responsibilities and support limitations shall be clearly described.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Children and youth

Where we work

Number of people receiving safe drinking water from community systems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

San Francisco Sect 3 EWB UC Berkeley: 5 Year Program Completion

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Focus has shifted to providing distance support to US based Universities. In 2020 very few; none could travel due to the COVID19 crises. Footprint serviced fewer clients locally, but more support.

Total weight of materials recycled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Plastic Recycle Community Empowerment Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This program is pending a sponsor and funding. Recycle company RECIMETAL has agreed to provide recovery containers and pick up plastic. Subsidies, i.e., support is needed to raise the value waste.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

San Francisco Sect 3 EWB UC Berkeley: 5 Year Program Completion

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Volunteers included EWB USA chapters at UC Berkeley. WPI also had two teams of 8. Local support from Kuna Nega and San Francisto along with San Lorenzo round out the figures.

Number of coalition members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

San Francisco Sect 3 EWB UC Berkeley: 5 Year Program Completion

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

UC Berkeley chapter of EWB USA is finalizing its 5 year program. Worcester Polytech Institute from Boston came out for 5th visit. Mich Tech has 2 iDesign Teams assigned.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since 21Apr08 Footprints has found and supports local community citizen associations with technical support, funding and coordination for infrastructure improvement. Outreach includes assistance with support of community centers and meeting halls to include its members and their enterprises and efforts. Footprint Possibilities also strives to improve basic health conditions through community outreach and supply of healthy foods and vitamins to those unable to afford them. Access to clean water and disposal of waste water are key focuses. Where possible Footprints sponsors trips abroad and regionally helping local citizens connect with their families or communities. As a small non profit Footprints can move fast and with few resources have an out sized impact.

Footprint also focuses on other international efforts, in countries other than Panama, where its core services are needed. These include engineering design, coordination, marketing, promotion and mentoring. This area of the non profit mission is in a growth pattern.

Working with US Based Universities Footprint can provide detailed designs for community development projects. Networking with local government entities allows implementation to proceed where other NGO efforts fail. Staying in the same communities for 5 years plus allows work to sustain itself and provides communities in need with follow on technical assistance, guidance and supervision. A local work yard stores materials, tools and equipment used in the development efforts and is shared by all entities who deploy to the area for work.

US University cooperation will be increased with focus on Capstone and other capital intensive entities included. The goals then would be to move into larger, better funded and supported water/ waste water programs. Execution of programs with projects would follow next, with supervision, monitoring and project control services included.

Use of our Google Charity status and AdWord funded campaigns, drive traffic to our web site, improve visibility and increase the opportunities for charitable cooperation.

The Vice President is a licensed Professional Engineer. The President is a retired, US Registered Nurse. This provides a good team arrangement for the promotion of community development projects that directly impact health and welfare. Working in the Panama City area for over 5 years, in the same communities, and focusing on those most in need, provides added capabilities that other NGO entities lack. Most do not focus on areas of dense need and do not re deploy to those same areas year on year to establish and maintain sustainable programs.

6 years working in Cerro Patacon, Panama. Footprint has constructed 5 water storage tanks holding 295,000 Liters of water. Over 15 kilometers of pipe, of 2 and 3 inch, have been installed. 5 working multi family septic tanks have been designed, constructed and commissioned. Two are at community centers or community lunch kitchens. 6 US based Universities send annual trips to Panama to work with Footprint and local volunteers on community development efforts. Local Associations have been formed, supported and empowered in four local communities; each promotes its needs with the local elected representative. Direct contact, affiliation and coordination is done with the National potable water and sewer authority. The office of the Mayor, City of Panama, Community Development, is a key stakeholder with direct contact. Both these entities have donated significant quantities of materials for Footprint projects.

We have erected Panama Cities only fully operational Slow Sand Filter, which uses no power and gravity feeds raw, ground water through prepared sand filters. This filter effectively and efficiently treats ground water making it potable. Meanwhile the 5 year program with San Francisco, Sect 3, Ancon, Panama comes to a close. The areas has been completely mapped and water is now flowing to over 500 residents. In Sectors 2 over 1500 residents now have water that was routed via a design made by Footprints.

Worcester Polytech Institute (WPI) now has come back for a 5th year with Footprint. Together the teams have developed and implemented top of the line work products, to include virtual site tours of Panamas premiere archeological dig, capture of historical documents in the Nation's oldest Catholic Parrish and other work products. This relationship has room to grow.

Michigan Tech (MTU) has worked with Footprint for 5 years and we are now part of its iDesign international effort. MTU and Footprint have designed water distribution networks for villages, one of which was La Playita, Panama. La Playita was the landing site for refugee flows that came up from South America. An MTU designed network was installed in this village. Footprint and MTU have designed other work products to include a Septic Tank Program for Kuna Nega, Ancon, Panama and a Water Distribution Network for Child Surival Aide Ghana. More work to follow.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Changes and adjustments 2020 Evaluation ⁃ Continue to reduce activities in the Cerro Patacon Panama area. ⁃ Expand the area of work in general Panama City metropolitan surrounding communities. ⁃ Close out the engineers without Borders USA five-year program. ⁃ Increased focus on services; design, mentoring, coordination, logistics and other support that can be done remotely. ⁃ Adjust and circumvent COVID19, its restrictions and requirements for health, while maintaining robust charitable activities.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

FOOTPRINT POSSIBILITIES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FOOTPRINT POSSIBILITIES

Board of directors
as of 4/30/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs Nancy Montanari

Footprint Possibilities Inc

Term: 2008 - 2018


Board co-chair

Mr Riziero Montanari

Footprint Possibilities Inc

Term: 2010 - 2018

Meagan Montanari

Footprint Possibilities Inc

Macklin Montanari

Footprint Possibilities Inc

Riziero Montanari

Footprint Possibilities Inc

Nancy Montanari

Footprint Possibilities Inc

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/16/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/11/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.