PREEMPTIVE LOVE COALITION

To Stop the Spread of Violence

aka Preemptive Love Coalition   |   Hewitt, TX   |  www.preemptivelove.org

Mission

Preemptive Love Coalition (PLC), a US 501(c)(3) organization, is a global movement of peacemakers committed to unmaking violence by confronting fear with acts of love. Millions of lives have been devastated by violence, pandemic, and crisis in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Latin America, and around the world. We stand on the frontlines, working alongside conflict and crisis-affected communities to provide relief to help families survive today, jobs to increase stability for tomorrow, and peacebuilding education to break the cycles of violence

Ruling year info

2009

President & Founder

Mr. Jeremy Courtney

Main address

1300 Darbyton Dr

Hewitt, TX 76643 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-2450109

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International Relief (Q33)

Promotion of International Understanding (Q20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Millions of lives have been devastated by war. In Syria, Iraq, and around the world. But the world keeps trying the same failed solutions to war, fighting fire with fire, going to war to prevent war. There's another way. We serve on the frontlines of conflict: mending the wounds of the war, while working to stop the next one before it starts. We help fast by providing emergency relief at the frontlines of conflict areas. We offer help that lasts by starting jobs that reduce the risk of recruitment into militias and terror groups. We help heal the past by changing the ideas that lead to war through relationships and education.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Job Creation and Microfinance

Families who have been displaced by conflict don’t need a handout. They need a hand up. We turn victims of violence into small business owners, employers, and sustainable sources of income and hope. Our empowerment grants equip soapmakers, bread bakers, shop owners, and other entrepreneurs in Iraq. We also empower displaced children by putting them back in the classroom—advocating with local officials to prioritize education, refurbishing schools, and providing uniforms and supplies for the classroom.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

We provide emergency food, shelter, and supplies to families on the run, as well as lifesaving support for those trapped by violence.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Asylum seekers
Refugees and displaced people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clinic visits provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Middle Eastern descent, Immigrants and migrants, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Emergency Aid in Conflict Zones

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

This metric can vary significantly as we move in and out of conflict zones. Decreasing metric means an increase in stabilization.

Number of businesses developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Middle Eastern descent, Immigrants and migrants, Unemployed people

Related Program

Job Creation and Microfinance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019 number includes one-to-one job creation in Iraq (167) and the number of farm businesses developed in Syria (250). 2020 numbers were down due to COVID-19.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Middle Eastern descent, Immigrants and migrants, Unemployed people

Related Program

Job Creation and Microfinance

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

IT workers trained and deployed into the workforce

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Preemptive Love Coalition (PLC), a US 501(c)(3) organization, is a global movement of peacemakers committed to unmaking violence by confronting fear with acts of love. We provide essential relief—food, water, shelter, and medical care—for families on the front lines of conflict and empower refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Iraq, Syria, and the U.S. Border, survivors of war, violence, and disaster, through business grants so they can rebuild their lives.

Everything we do is about building local capacity, investing in local institutions, and strengthening communities that will endure.

Delivering aid in conflict zones, and development in the aftermath, requires close coordination with local government, community leaders, and military officials. Partnering locally allows for quicker access, better ability to identify and meet needs in a culturally appropriate way, and ensures continuity and sustainability in services and overall infrastructure growth into the future. We are committed to long-term, lasting development and have a vision for sustainable solutions to issues facing those impacted by the regional conflict.

Once a population is liberated, after years of living under ISIS control or the oppression of violent conflict, they desperately want the opportunity to rebuild. To stem the population of those leaving a particular region, we focus our efforts on immediate needs with long-term impacts, helping rebuild infrastructure that will help the most vulnerable remain in or quickly return to their homes and communities.

Specifically focused on sustainability is our empowerment livelihood program. PLC embraces a human-centered approach to design solutions based on need and preferences of those we serve. True empowerment is based on relationships, and begins with listening. We spend time with families in their homes and hear their stories. They set their own goals and define their own successes. We work alongside new business owners as they develop their skills, coaching each individual in a way that empowers them beyond training into a self-sustaining business.

With more than a decade of continued presence in the Middle East, we have built meaningful relationships, allowing a deep understanding of the needs in each local environment. Our work is based on relationship, living alongside the people we serve, building trust across cultural, religious, and ethnic divides.

Our staff consists of individuals with knowledge and experience to specialize in nonprofit development, donor development, program management, financial prudence, and communications.

Financing is provided by a growing community of donors all over the world, including individuals, foundations, and partner NGOs.

With the rise of ISIS in 2014, PLC began responding to the critical needs of both those fleeing conflict, and those who remained in their homes suffering from the violence and lack of food, water, and other resources.

As this need grew in Iraq and later in Syria, so did our response. Since 2015, the number of people we fed in the form of month-long food packs increased by 2,828% and the number of empowerment businesses we helped start increased by 377%. We ended 2016 with a significant increase in restricted funding for our response to the fall of Aleppo and the resulting refugee crisis. As a result, we significantly expanded operations in Iraq and Syria.

In 2019 with the crisis on the US-Mexico border, we expanded our work to address the needs of legal asylum seekers with shelter and workforce training. In 2019 we began providing medical care to asylum seekers in Colombia. In 2020, we began providing emergency food to families in Venezuela. Our yearly impact reports can be found on our web site at www.preemptivelove.org.

We are working to build the most diverse community of peacemakers on the planet. We provide global peacebuilding educational content to support day-to-day peacemaking efforts to help heal what divides us. By providing relief, jobs, and community, we can stop the spread of violence and change the ideas that lead to war.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We show up with emergency relief—food, water, medical care, and more—for families on the frontlines of violence in Syria, Iraq, Mexico, and Venezuela. But then we stay, long after the immediate crisis has passed. We help refugees start small businesses, so they can provide for their families and rebuild their lives, without having to depend on handouts. Sectarian division lies at the heart of almost every conflict. So we put reconciliation at the heart of everything we do. This is about more than food, water, or medicine. It’s about healing hearts. We form coalitions across as many divisions as possible—Christian and Muslim, Sunni and Shia, and more—in pursuit of the more beautiful world our hearts know is possible.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Through clinics we support, we were able to add additional services for refugees and displaced persons who had special needs. We also added some trauma services related to gender-based violence when we identified the need. We've added additional support for reproductive health in areas with critical need. We move to new areas with relief aid when our partners see populations migrate. We listen obsessively to business beneficiaries to understand what economic needs are in their neighborhoods and identify market saturations to avoid starting new businesses that cannot survive in those markets.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback helps us build trust with those we serve. They know that our primary posture is one of listening and that we build our programs based on their needs. This helps foster dignity and autonomy.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Our beneficiaries are often refugee and migrants so follow-up is sometimes challenging.,

Financials

PREEMPTIVE LOVE COALITION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

PREEMPTIVE LOVE COALITION

Board of directors
as of 6/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Michelle Fisher

Jeremy Courtney

Preemptive Love Coalition

Pete Flowers

Preston Fischer

Chris Bonfield

Justin Blount

Clint Brown

David Statham

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/28/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.