Feeding Pets of the Homeless

Feeding Pets of the Homeless is the only national animal network focused completely on feeding and providing emergency veterinary care to pets of the homeless.

aka Pets of the Homeless   |   CARSON CITY, NV   |  https://www.petsofthehomeless.org/help-pets/

Mission

Feeding Pets of the Homeless believes in the healing power of companion pets and of the human/animal bond, which is very important in the lives of many homeless. They find solace, protection and companionship through their pets. They care for their pets on limited resources so they themselves have less. Our task, nationwide, is to feed and provide basic emergency veterinary care to their pets and thus relieve the anguish and anxiety of the homeless who cannot provide for their pets.

Notes from the nonprofit

Feeding Pets of the Homeless is the first and one of a few national animal organization focused completely on feeding and providing emergency veterinary care to pets of the homeless.

Ruling year info

2008

Executive Director

Renee Lowry

Founder/President

Genevieve Frederick

Main address

400 W KING ST STE 200

CARSON CITY, NV 89703 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Feeding Pets of the Homeless, LLC

EIN

26-3010540

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Veterinary Services (D40)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (W12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Homeless individuals feel isolated, vulnerable and outcasts of society. Their pet makes them feel loved, wanted and protected. A pet’s love for its guardian is unconditional, and unaltered by the lack of housing or income. To the homeless individual, their pet is their world, an extension of themselves. Their pet signifies that one thing is right in their world amid the uncertainty of their daily lives. Faced with little or no income, coupled with the uncertainty of where they will sleep each night, the homeless have no funds when their pet requires emergency treatment for an acute illness or injury. The pet guardians served by Pets of the Homeless are just like any other pet guardian; they love their pet and do not want it to suffer. They do not want their circumstances of homelessness to be a barrier to their pet’s wellness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Pet Food & Supplies

Donation
Sites collect
donations of pet food and supplies from the public.  Donation Sites are veterinary hospitals,
groomers, retail pet stores, kennels, churches, other non-pet related
businesses and other animal nonprofits. They or volunteers deliver the donated
food to pet food providers.

 

Pet
Food Providers are
community agencies such as food banks, soup kitchens and sometimes-animal
rescues serving the vulnerable populations with free food for pet and
guardian.  Although
we have a strong network of Donation Sites and Pet Food Providers, occasionally
when they have exhausted the donations, they will request additional food,
which Pets of the Homeless purchases and ships. This
happens when Pet Food Providers are not able to keep up with the demand.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

For
the general population, the life of a homeless individual is unfathomable. For
a homeless individual with a pet, life is hard, and choices few, but watching
their pet suffer is unbearable.  This
program supports pet guardianship by providing free medical care for the animal
that the guardian could not otherwise provide. It eliminates undue suffering
the pet might otherwise have to endure.  

 

 Like all of our programs (treatment,
vaccinations, etc.) they are free to the pet guardians that are homeless.  We pay the hospital directly for pre-approved
treatment.  During a procedure, if
anesthesia is required we ask the doctor if a “spay or neuter” would be
appropriate.  If the answer is “yes,” we
ask permission from the guardian.

 

Diagnoses
include parvovirus, swallowed foreign objects, puncture wounds, injured limbs,
broken bones, lacerations, digestion issues, and infections.  Treatment is costly because it often includes
x-rays, lab tests, sutures, surgery, and overnight stays.  Vaccinations are always updated.

 

This
program is unique because: (1) pets are treated in their community, (2)
licensed veterinarians are paid directly, (3) services are always  provided at a discount and (4) it allows for
immediate treatment thereby improving the health of the animal, and (5) it
reduces the spread of communicable diseases in the community.

 

Our Case
Managers determine eligibility based on organization criteria.  All treatment must be pre-authorized for
payment to the hospital/clinic for their services.

 

If the
pet guardian does not qualify, the Case Manager provides contact information
for other means of support or services that may assist the pet guardian in
providing for their pet.    Our network of over 766
veterinary hospitals go above and beyond to help pets who are injured and need
treatment.  They often write-off the
difference in what we allocate per pet which is $800.  For example, Pets of the Homeless
received a call from a homeless man who lives in a trailer on the streets with
his 12-year-old female Pit Bull Terrier, Stormy who was constipated.  We approved an examination.  The veterinarian called to let us know Stormy
was very ill, needed emergency pyometra surgery and was unsure if Stormy would
survive.  We contributed the maximum
allowable benefit towards the surgery, and the veterinarian discounted over
$960 in order to treat the pet.  The
owner called to say thank you and said we saved his dog’s life.  He was so appreciative and also said the
hospital was great to work with and provided extraordinary care for Stormy.  This is just
one of many examples.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Preventive measures such as
vaccinations for rabies, distemper and parvo are less costly than the treatment
for a pet that contracts one of these diseases. Vaccines eliminate the needless
suffering that the pet endures when they contract a life threatening
disease.  These vaccinations are
inexpensive.  This preventative measure
assists in minimizing the spread of disease from one community to another,
which is highly likely given the transient lifestyle of many homeless
individuals.

 

Wellness Clinics are our most cost
effective program, the result of the veterinarians and staff volunteering their
time.  Many times, the hospital can
obtain free or reduced pricing from their drug distributors or they use
soon-to-be expired vaccinations.  In
2017, the average cost per pet was $16.51 and includes: a basic exam, minor
treatment and medications, core vaccinations if needed, nail trimming,  ear cleaning, matt shaving, and sometimes
flea/tic treatment.  Many times a local
animal welfare organization will offer vouchers for spay/neuter surgeries. 

 

This program serves pet guardians
who are homeless or qualify for low-income services.  All services provided during the clinic are
free to the pet guardian.  Clinics are
held at locations that already serve the homeless and low-income such as a food
pantry.  Some clinics have been conducted
in conjunction with Project Homeless Connects, which occur across the country.

 



 

These clinics also provide education
on the following:

•             Good
pet guardianship including health tips

•             The
importance spay/neuter has on the health of their pet

•             The
importance spay/neuter has on minimizing the pet population

•             Local
licensing

•             Microchipping

 

If a pet is examined at the clinic
and requires more treatment due to an illness, the guardian is referred to our
Emergency Veterinary Care program.  The
pet is seen at the veterinarian’s hospital or another within a few days.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

For
homeless shelters and domestic violence shelters that honor the pet-human bond,
Pets of the Homeless provides free metal collapsible pet crates so that pets
can stay with their guardian. The crate(s) then becomes the property of the
shelter for future use.  This program is
important because unless the homeless can bring their pets in the shelter, they
will stay on the streets preventing them from receiving the needed social
services that will help get them out of homelessness.  This is our least successful program due to
extreme overcrowding in most homeless shelters in the country.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Where we work

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2015

National Coalition for the Homeless 2009

Please select...

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeless women that have needed emergency veterinary for their pet.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Homeless people

Related Program

Emergency Veterinary Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 Homeless women make up 61%

Number of homeless veterans that have needed emergency veterinary care for their pet.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans

Related Program

Emergency Veterinary Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Homeless veterans in 2020 make up 5%

Number of pounds of pet food that was donated.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people, Homeless people

Related Program

Pet Food & Supplies

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of pets served through emergency veternary care.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Emergency Veterinary Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Dogs 88%, most common dog breed: Pit Bull Terrier/mix and Chihuahua

Number of pets receiving vaccinations and care at a wellness clinic.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Unemployed people, Veterans

Related Program

Wellness Clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 only 4 wellness clinics due to COVID

Number of emergency veterinary services for pets of the homeless.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Emergency Veterinary Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Feeding Pets of the Homeless (AKA Pets of the Homeless) is committed to providing pet food and veterinary care to pets that belong to homeless across the U.S.
Our long term strategic plan focuses on the following areas:
1) Pet Food & Crates: Although we have a strong network of donation sites and pet food providers (soup kitchens, food pantries), occasionally a they will request additional food, which we purchase and deliver/ship.
2) Emergency Veterinary Care: Immediate veterinary care for acute illness or injury. This is our most costly program due to urgency and the diagnosis that frequently requires extensive treatment and surgery.
3) Wellness Clinics: We partner with veterinary hospitals to provide clinics where preventive treatment is offered to pets owned by homeless individuals or low-income families usually at locations where the homeless congregate. By sponsoring wellness clinic across the country we are helping to stop the spread of disease and illness.
4) Crates: We provide pet crates free of charge to homeless shelters that allow pets indoors if crated. The crates then becomes property of the shelter for future use.
All programs are free to pet owners who are homeless (the wellness clinics and pet food are extended to low income families).

Feeding Pets of the Homeless is focusing on creating improved ways to communicate with the homeless population and to bring awareness to the general public about pets that belong to the homeless.
• Recruit new donation sites and distributing agencies that will give out the pet food via our vast number of volunteers across the country and our website.
• Many homeless hear about the emergency veterinary care program from other homeless who have used your services, they also find us via the internet.
• Once a hospital has worked with us on an emergency case and learn more about our programs they are ready to take that next step of donating their time to help by having a wellness clinic. Many of our clients' pets have never had any vaccinations and so providing the funding for the hard costs veterinarians can donate their time to go where the homeless congregate and provide vaccinations and offer spay/neuters, which we will pay for after the clinic.
• Provide information on the importance of spay/neutering to homeless, who sometimes believe that they can sell puppies.
• Reach out to homeless shelters about the importance of allowing pets in with their owners. Without the social services provided at the shelters many homeless remain in homelessness.
• Publicize:
o We have updated our website and update it daily to better serve our clients and donors.
o Adding content 5 times a week on our Facebook page.
o Writing complying and heartwarming stories about the cases that we have helped in our newsletter.
o Press releases including our annual “Give a Dog a Bone" campaign to increase donations of pet food and supplies
• Advertise
• Continue to apply for grants from foundations
In 2017, we started an endowment fund which now has $282,000.

In 2017, we started an endowment fund which now has $282,000.
As of June 2021, Feeding Pets of the Homeless has a national presence with donation sites and distributing organizations in 50 states. In addition to another 300+ volunteers in every state and some in Canada. Our newsletter has a current readership of over 14,000 and our Facebook page has over 110,000 “likes". Feeding Pets of the Homeless is recognized as the leader on the topic and has gained the trust of the homeless population. With partnerships with over 1,070 hospitals we have provided veterinary services to over 20,000 pets that belong to the homeless. The 765 tons of pet food and supplies has helped hundreds of thousands of pets across the country.

Three main staff:
o Founder has extensive marketing and promotion experience and a wealth of information on homeless with pets. She has been quoted and appeared in a number of books, blogs, TV, radio and national consumer and trade magazines. She is the grant writer.
o Executive Director has been with the agency since the beginning, first as a board member and then applied for ED when the Board voted to hire. She has her Nonprofit Management Certificate from State University of New York. She is a member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals.

o Office Manager/Case Manager position was filled in Feb 2015. This staff member has widespread experience in social media, accounting, and customer service.

Feeding Pets of the Homeless' website is the main line of communication. It provides the homeless with a wealth of information to keep their pet healthy and well fed, as well as contact information to call us when they have an emergency. It provides the public with answers to their questions about pets that belong to the homeless. Information about the programs that the agency has and an avenue to ways to give donations whether in the form of pet food or monetary donations.

With a dedicated staff of two part time employees and five full time employees, eight board members, an advisory committee of three and hundreds of volunteers our goals are being met.

External strengths of Pets of the Homeless are the many private foundations, donors, and pet food donation sites and distributing centers that help to feed the hundreds of thousands of pets.

We are now registered as a charity in all States that have that requirement.

Feeding Pets of the Homeless has created a nationwide network that includes:
• 200+ donation sites (collect pet food and supplies that are distributed for free)
• 440+ pet food providers sites (food banks, soup kitchens and homeless shelters)
• Collecting and distributing over 765 tons of pet food with an estimated fair market value of over $3.2 million since its inception
• Has provided veterinary treatment to over 20,000 pets across the U.S. with our 1,070 hospitals nationwide.
We have sponsored 559 wellness clinics in 49 locations.
• 82 percent of every $1 donated to the agency directly funds our programs.
Awareness on Facebook has grown exponentially in the last few years as has all social media.
Newsletter subscribers have increased.

Like other nonprofits Feeding Pets of the Homeless has a few obstacles. They include: (1) screening the homeless over the phone, (2) searching for a hospital that the homeless can walk to when transportation is not available, (3) hospitals that will not discount services to our nonprofit, and lastly, (4) managing life threatening emergencies when our office is closed.

Financials

Feeding Pets of the Homeless
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Feeding Pets of the Homeless

Board of directors
as of 7/7/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Genevieve Frederick

Feeding Pets of the Homeless

Term: 2008 -

Genevieve Frederick

Feeding Pets of the Homeless

Renee Lowry

Feeding Pets of the Homeless

Micahel R. Crossley, CPA, ABV, CVA

Retired

Gary L. Ailes, DVM

Sierra Veterinary Hospital

Skylar Young, J.D.

Community Volunteer

Jennifer Rust

Edward Jones

Martin Jones, CPA

Retired

David Kowolek, DVM

Humane Society

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data