Uganda Village Project

Mission

To facilitate community health and well-being in rural Uganda through improved access, education, and prevention.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Ms. Kelly Child

Board Chairperson

Dr. Alison Hayward

Main address

340 S Lemon Ave #8979

Walnut, CA 91789 USA

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EIN

26-3025897

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Community Health Systems (E21)

Rural (S32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Healthy Villages

"Healthy Villages” is an innovative, grassroots approach to addressing rural healthcare and public health in Uganda. Its goal is to improve the provision of healthcare and of preventative health education to underserved populations across rural Iganga District (http://www.ugandavillageproject.org/where-we-work/iganga). Healthy Villages targets the primary health risks of the region at a village-by-village level, in partnership with the District Health Office of Iganga, the Sub-County officials, and the local Health Center staff.

We launched Healthy Villages in five villages during the summer of 2009, and continue to expand in the 70 targeted villages. All villages are based around five health centers, and all fall into the bottom quartile in sanitation and access to clean water. In this way, we have chosen to work with the most underserved villages in Iganga District.

Healthy Villages at Work
Through the Healthy Villages program, we work at a village-by-village level to address the most pressing healthcare concerns of each community: malaria, HIV/STIs, household sanitation and hygiene practices (which includes latrine coverage), and family planning access. We partner with community based organizations, non-governmental organizations, international and national interns, volunteers, and government officials ranging from the district to the village level.

Population(s) Served

Education
We educate our village communities about the importance of safe water in a variety of ways.  We hold village outreaches about the importance of gathering water from clean water sources (even if it means a longer walk to the source), and importance of treating, or at least boiling water intended for consumption.  We also educate villagers about the nature and danger of water-borne diseases contracted by drinking contaminated water.  We may also bring in local Community Based Organizations (CBOs) to do educational performances or outreaches about safe water. In addition to safe water information, we educate communities on sanitation best practices, including handwashing and proper sanitation facilities such as a latrine and garbage pit. These sanitation facilities do not only reduce the burden of diarrheal disease, but also reduce mosquito breeding grounds, helping to combat malaria. We conduct house-to-house visits where we address misconceptions and provide consultation on best practices based on a family's unique situation.

Throughout the years that we work in a village, UVP continues to facilitate safe water outreaches. Village Health Teams also continue to sensitize the community about the dangers of contaminated water, and how to best treat (http://www.ugandavillageproject.org/what-we-do/safe-water/safe-water-systems/)  water for consumption.

Population(s) Served

Virtually unheard of in wealthier nations, obstetric fistula is an affliction of the very poor, and is predominantly caused by neglected, obstructed labor. The result is a severe medical condition in which a hole (fistula) develops between either the rectum and vagina or between the bladder and vagina, making women incontinent. Most women with fistula are isolated from family, society, and employment.

Though a simple surgical repair can mend most cases of obstetric fistula, most women go untreated, afraid to admit to the condition or too poor to afford the repair.

We working to spread awareness and combat misconception about fistula through birth attendant education, community educational outreaches, and community drama group performances about fistula. Drama groups are a natural source for education on health issues, and are commonly utilized by Ugandan village communities.

In order to repair women with fistula, we partner with a UK-based organization called Uganda Childbirth Injuries Fund. We first identify women with obstetric fistula though a number of avenues – village outreaches, health center referrals, radio shows, and simple word-of-mouth between women. We then transport women three times a year to "repair camps” at Kamuli Mission Hospital, where they are repaired by surgeons from Uganda Childbirth Injuries Fund. In Uganda, all hospital patients must arrive with a friend to feed, attend and nurse them, and so we also transport one attendant for each patient.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We added an activity to our HIV program that reaches a demographic that was previously underrepresented within the program area.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Uganda Village Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Uganda Village Project

Board of directors
as of 5/8/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Alison Hayward

Alison Hayward

Richard Schroth

Alicia Majeau

Nathan Tauger

Brian Ourien

Rachel Piontak

Winnie Sabbat

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/08/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/08/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.