Youth Development

Corral Riding Academy, Inc.

For a leg up in life.

aka CORRAL Riding Academy, Inc.

Cary, NC

Mission

CORRAL is a Christian non-profit where girls in high-risk situations experience healing and transformational life change with a rescued horses and a loving community. We believe that anyone who has been broken can be made whole again and that horses can reach the heart of an at-risk girl in a way that others in their lives often cannot.

Ruling Year

2009

President

Joy Currey

Main Address

3620 Kildaire Farm Rd

Cary, NC 27518 USA

Keywords

Teen girls, high risk, disadvantaged girls, equine assisted learning

EIN

26-3122904

 Number

7559043811

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Equestrian, Riding (N69)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015.
Register now

Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

CORRAL has identified that there is a particular need surrounding young women- a demographic frequently overlooked when dealing with at-risk and adjudicated youth. Recent statistics have shown that female gang involvement is on the rise. And, according to the OJJDP, women now make up one-third of gang-involved youth. This number increases in areas where gang-involvement is heightened, as is the case in Wake County. During the 2011-2012 FY, females accounted for 30% of all juvenile arrests in Wake County, while this was a decrease from the 2010-2011 FY, CORRAL still believes that young women need an intervention specific to their needs.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Overview

The Riding Academy

Equine Rescue

Join the Herd

Where we workNew!

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Due to CORRAL's diverse approach to helping at-risk girls, the goals of this program are highly varied and, very often, long-term. Every year CORRAL staff creates a plan alongside each individual participant dependent upon their personal goals in academics, riding, and life in general. These individual service plans (ISP) are the basis for individual goals. CORRAL holds each girl accountable for the overall program goals. These annual goals include the following:
• 90% of girls completing the program will attend school over 95% of the time
• 75% of girl completing the program will have C's or better on their final report card
• 75% of girls completing the program will show at least a 10 point increase in Emotional Intelligence
• 90% of girls completing the program will have no court complaints during program participation
• 80% of girls completing the program will meet their individual service plan goals

At CORRAL, our long term goal is that each young woman who completes our program, no matter where she come from, has the skills, tools, ability and confidence to reach her full, God-given potential.

In order to keep track of the progress of each participant and horse in the CORRAL program, CORRAL keeps constants measures of success. Each week CORRAL staff checks in with each participant's school to keep track of grades and behaviors. CORRAL is in contact with each girl's referring agency and guardian no less than once a month to ensure that each girl is staying on course with the general and specific goals set forth by CORRAL and by the participant's ISPs. In order to keep track of the riding and horsemanship skills of each girl, CORRAL breaks the curriculum down to a series of markers. Instructors track when a rider is introduced to a new skill, is showing progression in that skill, or exhibits proficiency with that skill. This allows all instructors to know exactly where a participant stands in the curriculum, and at the end of the year, how much progress a student has made overall.

Finally, CORRAL has an Emotional Intelligence metric by which staff members assess the individual development of life skills in each participant. This measurement tool evaluates the less tangible aspects of participant growth including communication, leadership, individuality, confidence, problem-solving, and empathy. Each participant's intake procedure measures all the aforementioned metrics so that progress and areas of need can be recalculated annually.

CORRAL has a set or program wide metrics we use to measure success which are too lengthy to include here, but in summation: Short-term we see drastic academic improvement, with girls sometimes catching up 2-3 grade levels in less than a year. We also see improved peer relationships, better attendance in school, increased positive behavior and attitudes, and increased responsibility. Long term, it is our goal that each participant will leave the program as a conscientious, responsible, and independent young woman who is capable of setting and achieving goals, maintaining healthy relationships, and taking care of herself and those around her.

CORRAL is the only EAP organization in Wake County; CORRAL provides an intensive intervention- our service hours are much higher than other local interventions (15-20 hrs/wk); we are gender specific (only girls); we provide long-term, holistic wrap-around services; and we have found a niche of being faith-based while working “with the system".

Imperatively, CORRAL is a village. Last year, 680 volunteers donated 11,384 hours of service on the farm and 872 donors told our girls they are worth investing in. CORRAL has high expectations for our girls but provides high levels of support which makes meeting those expectations possible!

When a teenage girl graduates from our program, she is on track to be a strong independent individual that is ready to make a difference in the world. She is making and maintaining healthy relationships with peers who are a positive influence and she is MOTIVATED & DRIVEN to excel and PROUD of what she has accomplished. She believes in herself and has the CONFIDENCE to accomplish her dreams even though they are probably not easy. She understands the concept of hard work and has an ambitious attitude to make a difference. THIS is a CORRAL graduate.

Internally, we measure risk factors, GPAs and emotional intelligence scores and have seen positive changes at our regularly scheduled Parent/Team Meetings where individual goals are created, supported and celebrated by our teams and with our girls and families.

Founded in 2007, CORRAL Riding Academy has grown from one girl and one horse to serving 20 young women annually in our intensive intervention program with a herd of 11 horses.

Since inception, CORRAL has served 143 girls. 100% of the girls who have been involved with CORRAL have grown in their social and emotional skills. while 82% of girls entered the program were failing at least 1 class, by the end of the school year our average final grade was a B-. 100% of our high school senior have matriculated into college!

Last year Our most recent cohort of girls saw great success, here is a glimpse into their progress:
-Our girls' average GPA is 3.02
-70% of girls are passing classes with C's or better after one year in the program
-School attendance rose to 95.47%
-100% of girls are no longer involved in gangs or court after 1 year in the program.

What's next? We set aside time for strategic planning annually.

Here is our focus for the next 3 years:We will have a stronger work culture and staff development; we will have increased organizational capacity and operate CORRAL via established, effective, strong policies and procedures (maintain continuity regardless of staff turnover, including a leadership program for key leadership roles including mental health); we will define those to serve and serve them well; we will steward our property (which we now own); we will hone the program to make CORRAL a replicable example for other organizations beyond Wake County; we will be fully tapped into the community; nurturing donors, etc.

And most excitingly, by July 1, 2019 CORRAL will open their first satellite campus.

External Reviews

Photos

Financials

Corral Riding Academy, Inc.

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Need more info on this nonprofit?

Need more info on this nonprofit?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to view a Sample Report.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Not Applicable

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable