PLATINUM2022

NORTHWEST MOTHERS MILK BANK

Saving babies drop by drop.

aka NWMMB   |   Tigard, OR   |  www.donatemilk.org

Mission

Our mission is to improve the health and survival of the Pacific Northwest's most vulnerable babies.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Lesley L Mondeaux

Clinical Director

Joanne Ransom

Main address

15875 SW 74th Ave

Tigard, OR 97224 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-3458029

NTEE code info

Public Health Program (E70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We aim to improve the health and survival of our region's most vulnerable babies. One in eight infants across the Pacific Northwest are born premature. Prematurity puts and infant at risk for life-threatening infections, prolonged hospital admissions and lifelong disabilities. Evidenced-based research shows the use of human donor milk from an accredited milk bank should be the standard of care for supplementation of hospitalized premature and ill newborns, particularly those in neonatal intensive care units. An exclusive human milk diet for all infants is proven to provide the essential nutrients and immunological protection necessary for optimal growth and improved long-term health. Neonatal Intensive Care Units are one of the most expensive units in any hospital. However, studies show that for every dollar spent on donor milk, eleven dollars are saved in healthcare costs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Milk Donor Recruitment

Mothers and birthing parents whose babies arrive prematurely are often unable to produce breast milk, even though breast milk can be life-saving for premature babies. NWMMB screens healthy, non-smoking lactating people who have more milk than their own infant needs. Surplus breast milk from milk donors can save the lives of medically fragile babies. All babies deserve access to the best nutrition possible. All babies should have a chance to thrive.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We charge a processing fee to cover the costs associated with screening and processing donor milk. We never want that processing fee to be the reason an infant with a medical need cannot receive the donor milk they need. Evie's Fund is our community care program that ensures families with financial need can receive safe, donated, pasteurized breastmilk for their medically fragile babies.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Infants and toddlers

Expression of Care is a program based on the collaborative work between Northwest Mothers Milk Bank (NWMMB), Coffee Creek Correctional Institution (CCCI) and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHS). The program is designed to reduce breastfeeding barriers by providing lactation support, supplying milk collection bags, and offering a reliable milk delivery/shipping service for women who participate in the CCCI Breastfeeding Program. The program also supplies infant caregivers with educational resources about infant feeding and the importance of breastmilk feedings.

In 2019, NWMMB received an Immediate Impact grant from the Women’s Foundation of Oregon to implement the program. Financial donations and unopened boxes of milk collection bags are accepted to provide continued support for this essential program.

Population(s) Served
Detainees
Low-income people
Caregivers
American Indians
People of Latin American descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of ounces of donor milk dispensed to hospitalized infants.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of approved milk donors.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Women and girls

Related Program

Milk Donor Recruitment

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We saw a drop in milk donors, as did HMBANA milk banks nationwide. We feel this is partly due to mothers going back to the office as COVID restrictions eased in many places.

Number of ounces of donor milk dispensed to outpatient infants.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Low-income people, Women and girls

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We saw a significant increase in the demand for outpatient donor milk. We were able to meet that demand in 2021. We may need to decrease that amount in 2022, due to a drop in milk donation.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We envision a region where all babies have access to the human milk they need to grow and thrive. We aim to increase access to pasteurized donor human milk and to protect, support and promote breastfeeding with a specific focus on underserved and culturally diverse populations. We aim to partner with healthcare providers and researchers to advance evidenced-based practice.

Screening - we provide screening for healthy, nonsmoking, breastfeeding women who have more milk than their own baby needs. This screening is comprehensive and involves detailed health histories, medical consent from healthcare providers and a no-cost blood screening. Approximately 10% of our milk donors are bereaved. Our bereavement program supports mothers who wish to donate their milk after experiencing a loss

Milk Collection -Approved milk donors drop-off or ship frozen milk in individual collection containers. We carefully log each donation into a milk tracking software system.

Milk analysis - milk donations are analyzed using a mid-spectrum infra-red analyzer for macronutrient content. This information is provided on the label of each bottle of milk. This helps hospital staff as they create a feeding plan for premature infants.

Milk pasteurization - milk is gently mixed, bottled, and pasteurized using the Holder method of pasteurization. Milk is then frozen and a random sample is sent to an independent lab for testing.

Milk Distribution - safe donor milk is distributed by prescription to infants when their own mother's milk is not 100% available. Milk is distributed to both hospitalized and outpatient infants in Pacific Northwest communities.
Our community care program, Evie's Fund, supports families in need when their compromised baby is released from the hospital with an ongoing medical need.

Community Outreach - we work to raise awareness about milk banking and the importance of milk donation. This outreach includes hosting symposiums, tabling at professional conferences, and planning events to support new families. Over the last two years, COVID safety measures required us to move to the virtual space. Through community partners in both business and nonprofit, we've hosted outreach experiences using video and live social media experiences.

In 2021 we
Since 2020, Northwest Mothers Milk Bank has increased our milk drop partnerships from 39 locations to 46. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, hospitals, clinics and storefronts host Milk Drops. Approved milk donors can drop their frozen milk donations at these Milk Drops where they are temporarily stored in a deep freezer and promptly shipped to the Northwest Mothers Milk Bank for processing. Busy mothers are spared the task of packaging and shipping the donor milk. Milk Drops benefit by promoting the importance of breastfeeding and increasing foot-traffic in their facility.

Based on the belief that every baby deserves access to human milk, a community care program named Evie's Fund was established in 2014. Evie, born with no immune system, was our first recipient of community care. She was hospitalized for the first 10 months of life, enduring two bone marrow transplants. She is now a thriving eight-year-old. Evie’s Fund was established as a resource for families for whom the milk processing fees are a barrier. Through this fund we ensure that families with babies that have medical need can obtain human donor milk, regardless of their ability to pay. Evie’s Fund has grown each year, which has allowed vulnerable infants to receive life-saving donor milk after hospital discharge at no or reduced cost.

Northwest Mothers Milk Bank continues to respond to growth and increasing demand for human donor milk in both hospital and outpatient settings. Since opening our doors in July of 2013, the Northwest Mothers Milk Bank has distributed over 2.5 million ounces of donor milk throughout NW communities. In 2021 alone, we dispensed a record 582,555 ounces of donor milk and granted over $165,000 of assistance to families through Evie's Fund. We approved 846 milk donors, an 86% increase over our first year where we approved 122. We anticipate continued demand for donor milk and financial assistance in 2022. Our goal is to continue to meet that need.

Like other milk banks nationwide, we are experiencing a high demand for human donor milk combined with a decrease of milk donors. We have stepped-up our outreach for milk donors through social media efforts and community partnerships with local businesses and other nonprofits. We've increased staffing for donor screening and streamlined our screening process to shorten the time between the first contact with a potential milk donor to final approval.

In 2021 we increased our hospital-based milk distribution sites from 3 to 5 locations. At these sites, families are able to access donor milk for their infant within their geographic community. Milk distribution sites serve to eliminate the barrier of shipping when the need is immediate. Our goal is to open one more site in Washington during 2022.

COVID-related service changes that we continued in 2021 include: mobile phlebotomy services in many cities in order for potential milk donors to safely have their blood drawn; volunteers offering safe-distancing porch pick-ups of donated milk at donor's homes; and curb-side pick-up for milk for outpatient families and drop-off for milk donors. We will continue these services in 2022.

During 2021, our entire staff participated in a year-long diversity, equity and inclusion training program with consultant Teela Foxworth. We remain committed to ongoing education and learning opportunities for staff and board throughout 2022. In 2022, we will continue to build and grow relationships in our communities with culturally specific organizations that serve communities of color where there is an increased infant mortality and low breastfeeding initiation rates.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, Majority of babies we serve are unknown to us due to medical privacy issues

Financials

NORTHWEST MOTHERS MILK BANK
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NORTHWEST MOTHERS MILK BANK

Board of directors
as of 07/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cynthia Jackson

Retired - Providence Health & Services

Term: 2021 -

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/29/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability