PLATINUM2024

CITIZENS CLIMATE LOBBY

Our solution to climate change? Democracy.

aka CCL   |   Coronado, CA   |  www.citizensclimatelobby.org

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Mission

Citizens' Climate Lobby (CCL) creates the political will for climate solutions by enabling individual breakthroughs in personal and political power.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Mark Reynolds

Main address

1330 Orange Avenue #309

Coronado, CA 92118 USA

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EIN

26-3521896

NTEE code info

Citizen Participation (W24)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Climate change is the greatest threat to humanity and we need strong public policies to address the issue. The 2018 Global Warming of 1.5C IPCC report states that we have just over 10 years to get greenhouse gas emissions under control before facing irreversible damages, outlining that we must cut carbon emissions by 45 percent of 2010 levels by 2030. In the same report, IPCC scientists wrote that carbon pricing was a necessary first step for industrialized nations to sufficiently curtail emissions. This stance has been echoed by the last four chairpersons of the U.S. federal reserve, 27 Nobel Laureates of Economics, and more than 3,500 U.S. economists. Citizens' Climate Lobby seeks to build political will for climate legislation that will radically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Climate Education and Advocacy Program

A comprehensive educational program with training and tools on topics such as: climate science; policy impacts and solutions; grassroots organizing; securing grasstops support; clean energy economics; overcoming partisanship; strategic communications and motivational interviewing; relationship-based advocacy; media engagement; diversity, equity, and inclusion; and more.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Young adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new advocates recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Climate Education and Advocacy Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of meetings or briefings held with policymakers or candidates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Climate Education and Advocacy Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of stories successfully placed in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Climate Education and Advocacy Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of briefings or presentations held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Climate Education and Advocacy Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CCL mobilizes a growing coalition of well-informed climate advocates to advance effective climate legislation at the state and national level. Our primary goal is to help enact a national carbon pricing mechanism in the form of revenue-neutral carbon fee-and-dividend (CF&D).

Recognizing that political consensus is required in order for climate policies to be implemented quickly and remain long-lasting, CCL is committed to engaging political conservatives and building bipartisanship across the aisle.

Recognizing that climate change disproportionately affects those who have fewer resources and less political influence, CCL is committed to amplifying marginalized and underrepresented voices in the climate movement.

Through a transformative organizing model, CCL enables individual breakthroughs in the exercise of personal and political power, and provides a meaningful conduit for strong civic engagement. CCL supports volunteers to build strong in-district support and skillfully lobby their members of Congress for effective climate legislation.

CCL uses a unique relationship-based approach to climate advocacy, where volunteers are encouraged to first establish connection and common ground before ever broaching the topic of climate change. By focusing on the relationship first, CCL’s messages on climate change tend to be well-received in spaces that were once resistant.

Through a framework called “the five levers of political will,” CCL mobilizes its robust coalition of advocates. This method consists of concrete mechanisms to build public consensus on climate solutions and influence elected officials. The five levers include:

1) Engaging members of Congress, in the form of personal meetings, phone calls, and letters. By building ongoing relationships with elected officials, well-informed constituents are able to present a compelling case for climate action. Reports conclude that direct constituent interactions have more influence on lawmakers’ decisions than other advocacy strategies.

2) Media outreach. Members of Congress keep a close watch on in-district media. Moreover, studies show that public interest in a given issue is driven to higher levels by increased media coverage. By writing letters to the editor and op-eds for publication, volunteers are able to demonstrate political will to their elected officials and increase public support for climate action.

3) Grassroots outreach. By tabling at local events, presenting at local libraries and town halls, and building a social media presence, volunteers are able to recruit additional members to join CCE.

4) Engaging community leaders. By building support for climate solutions among business owners, faith leaders, and other influential people within local communities, volunteers are able to have an amplified impact on public opinion and the actions of elected officials.

5) Chapter development. Through chapter organizing, volunteers are able to take collective action and have greater impact. Chapters are run by Group Leaders, who strive to cultivate a positive culture that’s consistent with CCE values and best utilize the time and talents of volunteers. Many chapters establish committees to help establish shared leadership and support with specific tasks, such as welcoming and onboarding new volunteers or leading efforts for one of the other five levers.

Citizens' Climate Lobby's nationwide coalition of climate advocates has doubled or tripled in number each of the past six years to a current total of more than 200,000. With supporters in all 435 Congressional districts, CCL helps constituents establish trusted relationships with members of Congress based on local impacts of climate change and local benefits of climate solutions. This consistently-respectful approach allowed us to hold 1,714 meetings with congressional offices in 2019 alone.

The June 2019 CCL International Conference provided a window into CCL's capabilities and growth. Following 9,450 collective hours of education on the economics, science, and policy of climate change, nearly 1,500 Citizens' Climate Lobby volunteers held 529 meetings with congressional offices on Capitol Hill, carrying a message of concern—and hope—to the elected representatives of all 50 states.

The conference was also attended by representatives from more than a hundred NGOs; many contributed to panel discussions and participated in breakout sessions, helping to build the robust dialogue necessary to a resilient climate movement.

CCL has mobilized more than 200,000 climate advocates and played an integral role in the following:

The Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (EICDA): CCL volunteers have been the primary driving force behind the introduction and popularization of the bipartisan EICDA. When first introduced on November 27, 2018 by the 115th Congress, it marked the first bipartisan carbon pricing bill in a decade. Since it was reintroduced on January 24, 2019 by the 116th Congress, it has become the most supported carbon pricing bill in U.S. history. If implemented, the EICDA would reduce carbon emissions by 40% over the next 12 years, while creating 2.1 million jobs and protecting low- and middle-income families as energy costs rise.

Since the introduction of the EICDA, seven additional carbon pricing bills have been introduced in 2019, three of which also have bipartisan cosponsors. CCL considers the growing conversation on carbon pricing to be a reflection of our effectiveness in building public and political will for effective climate solutions.

Several state-level carbon reduction laws: In New York, CCL volunteers met with all 63 state senators to educate them about the Climate Leadership and Communities Protections Act, and played an instrumental mediation role between the governor and advocacy groups to finalize the bill language. In Maryland, CCL volunteers led a coalition of 663 groups to support the Clean Energy Jobs Act. To advance the Clean Energy D.C. Omnibus Act of 2019 in Washington D.C. and the Climate Action Plan to Reduce Pollution in Colorado, volunteers launched extensive door knocking, letter writing, and publicity campaigns for climate legislation. In addition to these four legislative accomplishments, CCL volunteers are involved in more than a dozen other state-level campaigns across the country.

The House Climate Solutions Caucus: By encouraging his member of Congress to create a space for bipartisan dialogue on climate, CCL volunteer Jay Butera was the primary driving force behind the foundation of the House Climate Solutions Caucus in 2016. Upon its founding, CCL volunteers across the U.S. have strategically worked to encourage their Representatives to join.

The Senate Climate Solutions Caucus: The relationships that CCL volunteers built with their Senators were so influential that CCL talking points were quoted when the Senate Climate Solutions Caucus launched on October 23, 2019. Since its founding, CCL volunteers across the U.S. have strategically worked to encourage their Senators to join. This space is intended to “look at what (they) can do to mitigate climate change and find early common ground” in order to craft and pass climate mitigation legislation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

CITIZENS CLIMATE LOBBY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CITIZENS CLIMATE LOBBY

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Zaurie Zimmerman

Piper Christian

Jerry Hinkle

Mary Selkirk

Center for Collaborative Policy

Natalie Orozco Ed.M

Ross Astoria

Alex Bozmoski

Efaon Cobb

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/22/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.