Saha Global

Saha gets the cleanest water to the hardest to reach people who need it most

New York, NY   |  http://www.sahaglobal.org

Mission

Saha gets the cleanest water to the hardest to reach people who need it most. We work in rural Northern Region Ghana where we set up entrepreneurial women with chlorinating businesses that provide clean water that all can afford.

Ruling year info

2009

Principal Officer

Katherine Cincotta

Main address

14 W 121st St Unit 1

New York, NY 10027 USA

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Formerly known as

Community Water Solutions

EIN

26-3802466

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over 800,000 people in Ghana's Northern Region depend on dirty surface water for drinking. Most of the region lies within the tropical savanna belt that experiences long dry spells followed by hard seasonal rains. There are only a few year-round streams and groundwater is inaccessible. Rural villages rely on water collected during the rainy season through big, stagnant ponds called “dugouts." But the water in these dugouts is muddy and severely contaminated with bacteria and fecal matter, putting villagers, especially children, at risk for waterborne diseases. Clean water solutions like household filters or bore- holes rarely reach these places, and when they do, they are poorly maintained. Household filter- ing products are too expensive for poor families, and lack of proper handling easily re-contami- nates the water.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clean Water Businesses in Northern Region Ghana

THE NEED
Over 800,000 people in Ghana’s Northern Region depend on dirty surface water for drinking. Most of the region lies within the tropical savanna belt that experiences long dry spells followed by hard seasonal rains. There are only a few year-round streams and groundwater is inaccessible. Rural villages rely on water collected during the rainy season through big, stagnant ponds called “dugouts.” But the water in these dugouts is muddy and severely contaminated with bacteria and fecal matter, putting villagers, especially children, at risk for waterborne diseases. Clean water solutions like household filters or bore- holes rarely reach these places, and when they do, they are poorly maintained. Household filter- ing products are too expensive for poor families, and lack of proper handling easily re-contami- nates the water.

A SIMPLE, LOW-COST WATER TREATMENT MODEL FOR REMOTE VILLAGES
The startling reality is that villagers can easily treat the water that they do have with resources available locally. This is where Saha Global comes in. Since 2008, we have connected the poorest, most remote communities to simple, cost-effective water treatment technology so that families beyond the reach of costly solutions can access clean drinking water. In each village, we have trained women to start and sustain small water treatment businesses so that their communities can have safe and affordable drinking water while women can earn supplemental income.

THE SAHA MODEL
1.) COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Saha works with local governments to identify villages that rely solely on contaminated surface water sources. Local leaders nominate two to five women to become Saha entrepreneurs to start a water treatment business.

2.) STARTUP TOOLKIT
We provide each business with locally available materials to build a water treatment center in the village, including a 1,000- liter Polytank, a metal Polytank stand, and three blue 200-liter drums.

3.) WOMEN’S TRAINING
Women learn to treat the water from contaminated sources to make it safe to drink and to run the water business, including pricing, frequency of treatment, and social marketing.

4.) COMMUNITY EDUCATION
Saha visits every household in the village to educate families about clean water, explain the water business to them, and distribute safe storage containers (SSCs) that prevent water re-contamination in the home.

5.) WATER TREATMENT
Women entrepreneurs fetch dirty water from the dugout, fill up the drums, and treat the water with aluminum sulfate that causes sediments to settle to the bottom of the drums, leaving the water clear. They transfer the clear water into the Polytank where they disinfect it with chlorine. They sell the treated water for a price that everyone in the village can afford: $0.03 per 20 liters, which is 40x more water for the same price of a sachet of sold in the nearest city. Villagers then store the treated water in SS

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls

After a Saha business is open, Women entrepreneurs receive ongoing mentoring and business advice from Saha until they can run their business independently. We monitor water quality and consumption in the village for 10 years – the amount of time it takes for us to collect solid, accurate data.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of communities provided clean water

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Extremely poor people, Low-income people, Children and youth, Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to reach the 800,000 people in the Northern Region of Ghana without safe drinking water by 2023.

We will reach our goals by opening new 226 businesses and training 452 women, leading to a total of 342 businesses in operation by 2020. To do this, we will double our team every year by hiring new staff who will undergo intensive training on Saha's model for 2 months. They will then work independently for 10 months and soon train new team hires. Each member will open 1 new business every 2 months. The monitoring team will check water intake and quality, and mentor women for 10 years. Our scouting team will identify new villages for Saha to work in, while a dedicated staff member will build relations with DAs, fostering their involvement in our work. Our monitoring team will conduct household and community visits, and teach villagers about the benefits of clean water intake to their families' health. This will influence a new habit for villagers to consistently drink clean water. In turn, this will increase demand, raising entrepreneurs' profit and villagers' adoption rates.

We believe that Saha's water business is a simple, replicable model for any rural village with surface water sources. Based on research, 30% to 60% of rural water projects fail, yet 100% of businesses we have launched are still in operation today. With an investment of $6,500, we can reach up to 500 people in 1 village through sustainable water enterprises. Our only major costs involve opening businesses, which use locally-available tools and have low operational costs. However, the amount of investment in our model determines the number of villages reached and businesses opened. Once a Saha business is open it is immediately financially sustainable -- the women entrepreneurs cover all costs with the revenue from selling drinking water.

To date, we have trained 326 women entrepreneurs who have launched 122 clean water businesses that serve approximately 56,247 people.

Financials

Saha Global
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Saha Global

Board of directors
as of 7/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Mark Ferrari


Board co-chair

Vanessa Green

Vanessa Green

Mark Ferrari

William Ambrose

Bennett Grassano

Patrick Cahill

Gregory Garvin

Mark Moeremans

Kate Cincotta

Jaya Tiwari

Abiba Zakariah

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data