Coalfield Development Corporation

Rebuilding the Appalachian Economy From the Ground Up

aka Coalfield Development   |   Wayne, WV   |  http://www.coalfield-development.org

Mission

Our mission is to support a family of social enterprises that inspire the courage to grow, the creativity to transform perceived liabilities into assets, and the community needed to cultivate real opportunity in Appalachia through mentorship, education, and employment.

Ruling year info

2011

Principal Officer

Brandon Dennison

Main address

P.O. Box 1133

Wayne, WV 25570 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-3836207

NTEE code info

Employment Training (J22)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We solve entrenched generational poverty caused by an undiversified economy long dominated by the coal industry. We have a totally broken economy in which residents can’t find enough good paying jobs to support families or create future opportunity for children. Negative impacts from generational poverty compound, creating complex obstacles to well-being: financial, emotional, physiological. People feel stuck. Even when jobs are found, achieving financial security is not permanent until these deeper complexities of poverty are addressed. A more vibrant economy depends on fostering entrepreneurship. But fostering entrepreneurship is particularly difficult in a place that’s been reliant on one industry for generations and needs economically restructured, a workforce that lags national averages in higher education, and where new investment is harder to earn than in cities. The best job-training program in the world doesn't matter if it doesn't actually lead to decent paying, quality jobs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Incubating Employment Based Social Enterprises

Launching new enterprises which prioritize the growth and development of the employees staffing the enterprise.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people

On-the-job training, higher education, and mentorship

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people

Converting dilapidated structures in to useful community assets

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Central Appalachian Network 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients passing job skill competency exams or assessments after completing course

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Incubating Employment Based Social Enterprises

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In addition to extensive training and support for our "participants" (we call them crew members) who are actually on our payroll, we open up trainings to the community at large.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients satisfied with employment training services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is a new metric we have only just begun to start capturing.

Number of participants who felt that they have been provided with a range of options for future employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This, too, is a new metric we've only just begun capturing.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of crimes in the housing neighborhood

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

should be reflected as negative percentages. 2017 = -42%

Number of new organizations signing on as collaborators

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of businesses developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

see Strong Mountain Communities and SEED Fund.

Estimated number of new funding sources secured for the sector

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

serving multiple sectors: local agriculture, solar, bio-based manufacturing, green-collar construction etc.

Number of graduates enrolled in higher learning, university, or technical/vocational training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients reporting increased knowledge after educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is a new metric we've only just begun to measure.

increase in adjacent property values

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of participants reporting no relapse 12 months post-program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is a new metric we've only just begun to measure

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have three core capabilities:
1) incubate and invest in employment-based social enterprises
2) Personal, professional, and academic development for people facing barriers to employment
3) Community-based revitalization projects

We use the enterprises and projects to create direct employment for people facing barriers. We recruit from four main community partners: local TANF office, local SUD recovery services, local unemployment offices, and local vocational programs. Hired recruits start out in our WRAPS program (Workforce Readiness and Professional Success), which is a paid 6 month on-the-job training cohort. Trainees have in-depth human support to stabilize their lives and establish goals. They complete community agriculture, light repair, and deconstruction projects. At least four professional credentials are earned during these six months. At completion, trainees have two options: 1) become a crew member on one of Coalfield's social enterprises or 2) work with Coalfield staff on a placement in our Employer Network earning at least what was earned as a WRAPS trainee.

For trainees who are placed with a Coalfield enterprise, they officially become a "Crew Member," which entails a 2.5 year contract. The contract commits the crew member to our 33-6-3 model: 33 hours of paid work, 6 hours of community college classroom time, and 3 hours of personal development (life skills/soft skills) support. Crew members complete their commitment once a) a Associates Degree has been earned, b) at least four more professional certificates have been earned, and c) once all four Personal Development Certificates have been earned (Employment Basics, Employment Excellence, Care for Self, and Care for Others).
Forces driving generational poverty are complex and interconnected. Therefore, our employee supports are holistic and mutually reinforcing. The structure detailed above is an important vehicle for effective case management. Monthly evaluations, weekly facilitated reflections, and weekly participation scorecards are helpful tools for accountability.

33-6-3 began in 2010 as a grassroots effort to address housing affordability in one rural county: Wayne, WV. Our resilient idea was born in the Great Recession and will adapt and lead through COVID-19. The idea grew directly out of community conversations with residents lamenting how their children seemed to only have two options: stay locally and suffer or leave to find work. Housing affordability was important, but housing alone in such a depressed economy was not enough of a social return on investment. Strategies that directly employed residents were needed. Our first social enterprise responded by hiring unemployed residents on construction crews to rehab affordable housing to be more energy efficient. We organized the work-week according to a 33-6-3 model: 33 hours of paid work, 6 hours of higher education, 3 hours of life-skills.

Achieving housing stability and empowerment out of generational poverty proved complex. One service for one need was not sufficient. We had to evolve to do more than just job-training. We had to be not only the job-trainer, but the job-creator. We also had to learn to mentor and address trauma. This is why we now emphasize the “6” and “3.” We create the supportive, flexible work environments which patiently support a resident’s agency, their rise out of the complexities of poverty. As 33-6-3 gained traction the main industry in our community (coal) was collapsing, leading to unemployment not seen since the Great Depression. We expanded to meet the dire need.

We are emerging out of rapid growth which stretched our internal systems but ultimately left us stronger and more efficient. In growing, we have started ESE’s in multiple diversified sectors. While valuable to our communities, this has often led to a lack of focus and clarity (both externally and internally). We are now taking steps to consolidate some of our smaller enterprises

Our CEO has a Masters Degree in Nonprofit Management from Indiana University, Bloomington. Our staff has more than 100 years combined experience in public and non-profit management. Our development team is focused on making these various supports work for our people. This team consists of four full-time employees with experience and passion in these human development fields. In addition to extensive special supports, we also just try to be a solid employer. Everybody starts at no lower than $12/hour. All crew members (including trainees and crew members) receive health, dental, vision, and life insurance. All receive paid-time-off time. Our board is 1/3 represented by low-income census tracts and has extensive professional experience represented.

-1200 people trained
-over 250 new jobs created
-over $20 million leveraged
-over 200,000 square feet revitalized
-over 50 new businesses started

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email, Council Days,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Broader benefits package. Also, our new WRAPS program, a major program re-design, was a direct result of feedback from the field.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Coalfield Development Corporation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Coalfield Development Corporation

Board of directors
as of 12/22/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Larry Castle

Chase Thomas

Joetta Hatfield

Ric McDowell

Kenzie New

Andrew Dawson

Carter Stewart

Mitzi Russell

Tommy Adkins

Marilyn McClur-Demers

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/21/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/21/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.