Animal related

PHILADELPHIA ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY

Working to make Philadelphia a no-kill city.

aka PAWS

Philadelphia, PA

Mission

PAWS is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to saving Philadelphia's homeless and at-risk pets. PAWS is the city's largest rescue partner and provider of low-cost, basic veterinary care for pet owners and rescue organizations that cannot otherwise access or afford it. Through its three no-kill shelters, foster care network, and special events, PAWS finds loving homes for thousands of animals each year. PAWS is working to make Philadelphia a no-kill city where every healthy and treatable pet is guaranteed a home.

Ruling Year

2009

Executive Director

Melissa Levy

Main Address

100 N. 2nd Street

Philadelphia, PA 19106 USA

Keywords

animal welfare, philadelphia, PAWS, dog, cat, rescue, spay, neuter, adoption, foster, phillypaws, animal welfare, Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society, pets for adoption, animal rescue, animal shelter, animal foster parents, stray pets, cats for adoption, dogs for adoption, spay and neuter, adoption center, orphaned pets, animal control, saving lives, special needs animals, sick animals, injured animals, kittens, puppies, microchip, vaccinations, dog license, best friend, adopting a pet, no-kill

EIN

26-3862631

 Number

7399392979

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

There has been a dramatic reduction in Philadelphia's homeless pet population since PAWS began: 50% fewer animals entered the city shelter in 2019 than when we started in 2006 – 15,000, down from 30,000. The lifesaving rate has also skyrocketed, 87% in 2019, up from the abysmal 11% that prompted PAWS' founding more than a decade ago. Still, 463 savable homeless dogs and cats entering Philadelphia's animal control shelter in 2019 were euthanized there. To make Philadelphia a no-kill city, more animals must be adopted into loving homes, struggling pet owners must get the help they need to keep and care for their pets, and unwanted litters must be prevented. In Philadelphia, where 26% of the population lives in poverty, hundreds of thousands of pet owners cannot afford or access basic veterinary care. Their pets are the ones most vulnerable to being abandoned and euthanized in shelters.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

3 10 11 15 17

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Pet Adoption

Foster Care

Low-cost spay/neuter and veterinary care

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of animals rescued

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Pet Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animal adoptions

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Pet Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals spayed and neutered

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Low-cost spay/neuter and veterinary care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of animals spayed and neutered per day

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Low-cost spay/neuter and veterinary care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

spay/neuter is performed 5 days per week, so average is calculated based on available surgery days rather than calendar days.

Number of community pets provided with basic veterinary care

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Low-cost spay/neuter and veterinary care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Our ultimate goal is to reduce the homeless animal population in Philadelphia until only untreatable pets are euthanized in shelters. Specifically, by rescuing animals and providing services to needy pets at our clinic, we aim to:

• Reduce the city's use of euthanasia as a means of population control;
• Reduce the number of stray and unwanted pets entering the city's animal control shelter;
• Prevent the birth of unwanted litters born to owned pets; and,
• Enable communities to manage feral and stray cat colonies more effectively and affordably, and in the process, curb the number of stray litters born (which are vulnerable to the elements, susceptible to disease and injury, and potential victims of cruelty).

Our efforts are based out of our boutique-style Adoption Center in the Old City section of Philadelphia, which showcases adoptable animals in an inviting setting, our Spay/Neuter and Wellness Clinic in the Grays Ferry section, and our Northeast Adoption Center and Low-Cost Clinic, which brings our services to a community that previously lacked them.

Through these locations, combined with our strong and ever-expanding foster care network, PAWS is expanding the safety net for the city's most vulnerable animals. Our rescue efforts match homeless pets with loving fosters and adopters. Our prevention efforts provide struggling pet owners with affordable basic veterinary care. Over time, these services both increase homeless pets' chances of leaving the city's animal control shelter alive and finding safe, caring homes, and decrease the overall number of animals entering the overburdened shelter in the first place or being born on the streets.

RESCUE: Each of our adoption centers can house 2-4 dogs and approximately 40 adoptable cats at any given time. Our no-kill shelters can house a total of 36 sick cats in isolation, enabling them to recover from common illnesses and become ready for adoption. We can also house as many as 80 kittens (with or without their mothers) in our nurseries, while they await placement in temporary foster homes where they can grow in a safe and nurturing environment until they reach an adoptable age. Our shelter's kennels can house up to 17 dogs while they await placement in foster or adoptive homes. In addition to safety, housing, and proper nutrition, all animals in our care receive veterinary attention, daily TLC, socialization, and behavioral enrichment from staff and volunteers. Our goal is to prepare the animals we rescue for a successful transition to a forever home, beginning as soon as they arrive at one of our facilities, and to support that transition even after the animals have left our care, to help ensure success in their new homes. PREVENTION: Our clinics provide high-quality, high-volume, low-cost basic veterinary care seven days a week. We serve more than 38,000 pets each year, performing thousands of spay/neuter surgeries and providing vaccinations and management/treatment of the most common health conditions (upper respiratory infections, parasites, skin conditions, etc.). The goal of these services is to stop the birth of unwanted litters and to enable pets to remain as cherished family members, rather than face abandonment due to unaffordable or inaccessible veterinary care. We also extend our services to other rescue organizations, so that they can stretch their limited resources and maximize their lifesaving capacity.

In addition to the long-term indicators of our success (intake and euthanasia rates at the city's animal control shelter), we evaluate our progress based on several markers:

• The number of animals we rescue;
• The number of spay/neuter surgeries performed in our clinics; and,
• The number of pets who receive basic veterinary care in our clinics.

The eventual, combined effect of our lifesaving and prevention efforts will be fewer animals flowing into shelters and gradually lower euthanasia rates until no healthy or treatable pets are killed at all.

PAWS has steadily increased the number of animals it saves and serves, from nearly 3,000 in 2009 to more than 43,000 in 2019. We have done so by constantly working to engage the community in our efforts, making it as easy as possible for them to join our mission by adopting, fostering, volunteering, or donating. We have also expanded our physical presence to include three facilities, making our low-cost clinical services available to as many struggling pet owners as possible. The primary indicators of our success are the overall intake and euthanasia rates at the city's animal control shelter. Intake and euthanasia rates at the city shelter have been steadily decreasing since 2011 -- both signs that our efforts are making the desired impact on the city's homeless animal population. We must and will continue expanding the safety net we provide to the city's neediest pets until every healthy and treatable pet is guaranteed a home.

External Reviews

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Financials

PHILADELPHIA ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes