Arts, Culture, and Humanities

Rhode Island Latino Arts

Providence, RI   |  http://www.rilatinoarts.org

Mission

Rhode Island Latino Arts promotes, encourages and preserves the art, history, heritage and cultures of the Spanish-speaking communities of Rhode Island.

Notes from the nonprofit

Rhode Island Latino Arts completed its strategic plan to provide capacity building and board development. Six new board members have been added and a 5-year fundraising plan is underway.

In 2014 the board launched a capital campaign to open the first Latin American Cultural Arts Center in RI. UPDATE: Capitol campaign still in discussions and in the meantime, RILA has opened La Galería del Pueblo Latino Cultural Center. We are renting this space and community programming will be offered and evaluated to support our capitol campaign.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Ms. Marta V Martinez

Main address

PO Box 25118

Providence, RI 02905 USA

Show more addresses

Formerly known as

Hispanic Heritage Committee of RI

EIN

26-4062309

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

Arts Service Activities/Organizations (A90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Rhode Island does not have a sustainable Latino cultural arts center.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hispanic Heritage Month | Rhode Island

September 15 - October 15, is Hispanic Heritage Month. This celebration is our signature event when we organize and promote statewide events and activities the promote the Latino culture.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Budget
$5,000

The collection of stories of Rhode Island Latino Pioneers and ongoing workshops, walking tours and presentations on Latino history in Rhode Island.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
At-risk youth
Budget
$10,000

We provide workshops at local schools, libraries and community organizations by connecting local Latino artists with young people who wish to learn traditional art of Latino America and acquire art skills including dance, visual art, community murals, music and folk art.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
People of Latin American descent
Budget
$15,000

The only Latino gallery and cultural hub in Rhode Island.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
People of Latin American descent
Budget
$8,000

Our annual fundraiser features a taste of Latino cuisine and promotes Latino-owned businesses in Rhode Island. It is normally held during Hispanic Heritage Month, often on September 15th as we launch the month-long celebrations of Latino culture.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
People of Latin American descent
Budget
$5,000

Teatro Latino del Pueblo @RILA was founded in 2016 as a forum for Latinos to develop and present new bilingual plays. Our mission is to provide opportunities for artists, producers and audiences to discuss and advance bilingual Latinx theater in Rhode Island and nationwide.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Immigrants, newcomers, refugees
Budget
$5,000

Rhode Island Latino Books Month promotes literacy amongst Latinos through the celebration of Latino authors, illustrators and books that highlight Latino culture and Latin American identity. Through this month-long celebration, RILA encourages librarians, teachers, educators and booksellers to promote books written by and for Latinos, and we encourage all Rhode Islanders to read books in both English and Spanish.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
K-12 (5-19 years)
Budget
$2,000

Where we work

Awards

Recognition 2016

United States House of Representatives

Creative Community Award 2017

New England Foundation for the Arts

Affiliations & memberships

National Endowment for the Arts - Partner

National Trust for Historic Preservation Member 2018

National Association for Latino Arts & Cultures 2014

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Intersex people,Adolescents (13-19 years),People of Latin American descent

Related Program

Latino History Project of Rhode Island

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We began offering field trip for the first time in 2017. In 2018, we opened our gallery doors to schools and other youth groups.

Number of paid participants in conferences

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified,Adults,People of Latin American descent

Related Program

Community Workshops

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

With the addition of drumming workshops we began charging "pay as you come"

Average online donation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults,Families,Multiracial people

Related Program

La Galería del Pueblo |The People's Gallery

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The opening of La Galeria del Pueblo contributed to increase in donations.

Number of meetings held with decision makers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified,Multiracial people

Related Program

La Galería del Pueblo |The People's Gallery

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our main work involves "building bridges" and forming partnerships with decision makers, including funders, arts organization ceos and public policy makers.

Total number of paid admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified,Children and youth (0-19 years),At-risk youth

Related Program

Community Workshops

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our drumming sessions have not increased much since last year. We also added poetry, writing and podcasting workshops.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified,Adults,Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

Related Program

La Galería del Pueblo |The People's Gallery

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have three volunteers who work with us to collect oral histories, are docents during gallery nights and assist us during artists meet ups.

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified,People of Latin American descent,Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

Related Program

Latino History Project of Rhode Island

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We received two large federal grants for the first time in 2018. Those grants served as seed money to receive additional grants support from local foundations.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

We seek to culturally integrate Latino arts and artists by creating, stimulating, and supporting cultural, educational and artistic activities through the La Galería del Pueblo - Rhode Island's only Latino Arts Gallery and Cultural Hub. We see ourselves as a cultural mediator at the grassroots level between Latino and non-Latino organizations.<br/><br/><br/>Goals: La Galería del Pueblo <br/><br/>• To provide a venue and opportunities for persons to engage in dialogue and exchange ideas with a focus on Latino artists and the arts in Rhode Island. <br/>To examine and explore the programming of arts activities that meet the needs of the Latino community.<br/>▪ To celebrate and feature individuals, projects and programs with a focus on Latino arts.<br/>▪ To generate connections across an expanding network of individuals and groups who embrace the mission and goals of the RI Latino Arts Network and the Hispanic Heritage Committee of RI.

We have moved the location of La Galería del Pueblo to a larger, more expansive building located in an underserved community with a population that includes 70% Latinos. This venue will allow us to expand and offer more programming such as theater arts, drumming, sketch classes, dance and a more ample space to exhibit visual art and offer artists demonstrations.

RILA has successfully worked to strengthen its board and raise organizational capacity -- in 2018 we added seven new board members to the organization. The board will be stepping up to raise unrestricted funds to support and help maintain La Galería.<br/><br/>In 2018 RILA will be undergoing a series of community forums (pláticas) with stakeholders who will help inform the kinds of programming we can and should be offering. Participants will include Latinos of all ages, artists, business owners and funders.

Once we develop a fundraising strategy, create a timeline and build a stronger board, we will ensure at least one board member is present at every event we sponsor/organize. A simple task as such will show progress that our board is vested in our mission.<br/><br/>At the end of community plática, we expect to find untapped resources, such as artists and businesses who may not be fully aware of our work. Through these venues, we can begin to locate and recruit potential board members, solicit donations, grow our programming and most importantly, begin to learn what we have been missing.

The opening of our new Latino gallery has brought greater visibility to our organization and build a bridge to educate non Latinos about our culture. We have been able to maintain the gallery and interest by various local artist by including artists in creating and contributing to our schedule of event.<br/><br/>Next is being closer to the Latino community, providing young people with the resources they do no have in their schools and supporting youth and their potential for creative expression through the arts.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), community meetings/town halls, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, suggestion box/email.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: the people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    For our first venture into renting our own location we opened a Latino Art Gallery (La Galería del Pueblo) after hearing from our network of artists that we (Latinos) needed to have our own space to show Latino art. The first year was so successful that we outgrew the gallery space, and artists once again encouraged us to find a bigger location, and this time, with room for performing arts and a place for monthly meet ups. In 2017, we moved to our own building and opened the first Latino cultural center in the state, where we successfully have rotating visual art exhibitions, monthly workshops or artists meet ups and will soon have a performance space for theater, dance and music.

Financials

Rhode Island Latino Arts
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Rhode Island Latino Arts

Board of directors
as of 12/24/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jose Ramirez

Self Employed/Photographer

Term: 2019 - 2021

Tia Ristaino-Siegel

City of Central Falls

Angelica Rivera

Navigant Credit Union

Tyler Dobrowsky

Trinity Repertory Company

Winifred Lambrecht

Rhode Island School of Design

Joseph Flynn Molina

Attorney, Self-Employed

Miguel Quezada

Sanofi

Richard Glenn

Attorney, Retired

Robin Xiong

PhD Student

Michelle DePina Medina

Met Life

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/24/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/06/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Keywords

Latino, Hispanic, Art, Culture, History, Community