Global Village Project

We Dream a World, One Girl at a Time

Decatur, GA   |  www.globalvillageproject.org

Mission

Global Village Project is an innovative special purpose school for refugee girls and young women with interrupted schooling. Our mission is to develop a strong educational foundation for each student within a caring community using a strengths-based approach and intensive instruction in English language and literacy, academic subjects, and the arts.

Ruling year info

2009

CEO Head of School

Ms. Elizabeth Elango Bintliff

Main address

PO Box 1548

Decatur, GA 30031 USA

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EIN

26-4152199

NTEE code info

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The seeds of GVP were planted in 2007 by a group of volunteers who came together to support and tutor 5 Afghani teen girls in Clarkston, GA. By 2009, they’d founded Global Village Project, the only school in the country dedicated to meeting the educational needs of recently resettled refugee young women and preparing them for high school. As current and former educators, they had witnessed the specific and unique challenges facing refugee students who entered the public school system. More than a decade later, these challenges persist. In 2017, NPR’s “5 Million Voices” reporting project showed that Georgia’s English Language Learners achieved a high school graduation rate of just 43.9%, compared to an overall graduation rate of 72.5% for native speakers. On top of learning a new language, refugee students must also navigate new cultural and social settings. Recognizing these and other disparities in outcomes, GVP was designed to remove the barriers that exist for refugee students.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics)

Like Intensive English and Literacy, STEAM-integrated instruction is a driving force behind the GVP framework and curriculum. As students engage in activities that combine different elements of STEAM, our teachers lead them through guided inquiry in which they must ask thoughtful questions, discover possible answers, refine their hypotheses based on findings, apply what they learn, and problem-solve creatively. These types of dynamic experiences make learning interactive and student-driven rather than rote and stagnant, further expanding on GVP’s commitment to strengths-based education.

Each year, students engage in four integrated units of study that provide the basis for STEAM integration. For example, our school’s “Lifeworks” unit focuses on women who dedicate their lives and careers to their communities as workers, leaders, and advocates. These historical figures and their contributions can be explored from the vantage point of many different academic subject areas: in science, by studying figures like Marie Curie and replicating her commitment to the scientific method; in drama, by writing and performing monologues about the subjects of their research projects on historical and contemporary women leaders; in music, by learning and composing original songs about different types of women’s work.

Experiential learning trips have always been a significant component of STEAM integration at our school, and we are committed to translating as many of these opportunities as possible to the online learning environment. As many of our longtime STEAM partners (such as Synchronicity Theatre’s Playmaking for Girls program, High Museum of Art, and Alliance Theatre) are also operating remotely, we are optimistic that we can continue to incorporate many of these well-loved and highly impactful programs into our regular academic schedule this year. The arts have always been, and will remain, core to our STEAM approach; particularly for language learners, the arts provide opportunities for creativity, self-expression, and confidence building that are critical for their success.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Women and girls

A robust community mentoring program has been an important part of GVP programming since the early years of our school. With the help of dedicated volunteer mentors, GVP’s caring community continues to support students even after they complete our academic program. Community-oriented and community-based, our mentoring program helps students, alumnae and their families as they continue on their educational journeys. Passionate people who have volunteered at GVP and worked alongside students commit to long-term, consistent mentoring of an alumna as she advances to high school and beyond. Students are matched with mentors during their final year at GVP, giving them time to forge relationships and prepare for the educational experience beyond our school.

We are also expanding a new focus on peer mentoring, which was initiated by our Alumnae Advisory Council (AAC), the school’s first alumnae leadership group. In 2019, GVP provided funding and professional facilitation and workshops for the founding AAC members, who self-determined their structures, purposes, and goals. The group meets several times per year to identify priorities and plan their activities in support of current GVP students. Many AAC members continue to be familiar faces around our school and develop strong relationships with current students. They volunteer in math classes, help with instrument lessons, visit socially with students in their homes, and are generally available as a source of information and support along students’ journeys during and after GVP. While some AAC plans have been put on hold due to the coronavirus, new opportunities have also emerged, such as networking events to facilitate connections between current and former students via Zoom and mask-making and delivery. As research shows that social integration and building positive relationships are significant success indicators for newcomer students, the AAC will continue to play a pivotal role in the educational journeys of each new generation of GVP students, while also using their voices to contribute to GVP’s continued strategic growth and vision.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Women and girls

Our Intensive English Language and Literacy program is at the core of our academic model. We recognize that access to English and to literacies of different kinds will open minds and doors and empower students. Our approach to literacy instruction, as with all subjects, is strengths-based rather than deficit-based; we seek to build on what our students already know and on the funds of knowledge that they already possess. The literacy curriculum centers building connections at the intersection of students' cultures, life experiences, and linguistic expression. In the classroom, this includes small-group and one-on-one instruction so that the curriculum can be tailored to the needs of each student, as well as a carefully curated collection of books and a new virtual library created by our dedicated volunteers. There are books at all levels and on almost every topic, thus removing the stigma faced by many English Language Learners who, in the absence of level-appropriate resources, often must start by reading books that are written for young children. Additionally, our library intentionally includes books that have strong and courageous women, women of color, refugee families, and people of all faiths and backgrounds reflected throughout their pages. As our school building is closed during the temporary but ongoing shift to online learning necessitated by the global pandemic, students do not have access to the library; thus, we have engaged our corps of volunteers to create the GVP Virtual Library. Volunteers have created dozens of videos of themselves reading aloud from library texts, a powerful resource that helped to combat summer learning loss and has created ongoing opportunities for students and their families to practice and hone their literacy skills.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Women and girls

Perhaps more than any other curricular pillar, SEL & Wellness programming is poised this year to play a significantly expanded role in ensuring our students are equipped to succeed at online learning. This is one of the newest formal pillars of our educational model, built out in the past few years in recognition of the fact that meeting students’ social and emotional needs is fundamental to helping them succeed academically. A key component of the SEL program as part of our students’ academic schedule is weekly group counseling classes, which are led by our School Counselor/SEL Coordinator and organized by Form (academic level.) Lessons and activities focus on building critical SEL skills, including self-awareness, social awareness, and self-management.

The global pandemic has also necessitated that GVP step forward with new “wraparound” services to foster the social-emotional health and wellness of our students, and we are committed to meeting these needs. The continued physical closure of our school means that students will miss out on the free lunch they receive daily through a partnership with Agnes Scott College; since mid-March, we have been making semi-weekly deliveries of both fresh and nonperishable foods and other supplies, including masks and other PPE, to all GVP families. During these visits, we have been able to maintain vital contact and connection with students and parents. We know that keeping in close touch is the best way to keep students engaged during virtual learning, and anticipate doing even more outreach via phone calls and physically distanced in-person visits this fall. Our expanded efforts in the area of student and family support are guided by our School Support Specialist, who speaks many of the home languages spoken by our students and families. Through these conversations, GVP serves as a vital link between the community we serve and much-needed resources and information. The physical closure of our school presents an obstacle to maintaining our strong sense of community, one of the most special parts of GVP. But we are also seeing how the online environment is giving rise to new kinds of engagement and connection and are committed to ensuring that each GVP student and parent feels fully supported, whether learning takes place within the walls of our school or at home.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Women and girls

Where we work

Accreditations

Georgia Accrediting Commission

Awards

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The best possible outcome from our increased attention on the holistic needs of each student as described above – as with all components of our curriculum – is that removing these barriers allows our students to focus on catching up academically during their time at GVP and that they will continue on to succeed in and graduate from high school. This is our ultimate measure for student success. Over the past 11 years, GVP’s mission and activities have continued to expand in order to more comprehensively meet the needs of our students. While the early goal of GVP was to serve as a bridge to success in high school, over the years we have seen our students achieve far and above that threshold. GVP alumnae aren’t just ‘getting by’ academically; they thrive in the classroom. They aren’t just making it to high school; they are excelling in their studies, taking on leadership roles within their schools and communities, winning scholarships and awards, graduating with honors, going to college, and starting their careers.

The GVP model was designed from the ground up as an educational approach that would intervene by intentionally removing the barriers that exist for refugee students. As this educational model—which is intensive and highly individualized, and emphasizes creativity, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and confidence—took shape and has grown, we are seeing the transformative power of a school curriculum that is designed to not only meet the needs of refugee young women but also amplify the strengths, skills, and voices they bring to our learning community. Our educational approach and strategies are guided by the four foundational pillars summarized below and described in detail in the “Current Programs” section:

Intensive English Language and Literacy, which is focused on opening doors and empowering learners through language learning;
STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math), which promotes integrated learning, creativity, innovation, and critical thinking;
Social & Emotional Learning (SEL) and Wellness, which addresses the holistic needs (physical and emotional) of our students, including food insecurity;
Mentor & Alumnae Programming, which sustains support for our alumnae in the long-term and develops their leadership beyond GVP.

Each of these pillars was designed with educational equity as a primary goal, based in research on how educators can remove barriers that students like ours face, while amplifying their voices as powerful refugee young women. Though each pillar will look a little different in the temporary but ongoing online learning context, all four will continue to be thoroughly integrated in order to create robust and interconnected learning opportunities for our students.

Our five highly-qualified classroom teachers collectively specialize in multicultural education, ESOL, urban education, and responsive teaching. In addition to classroom teachers, our three academic coordinators are responsible for different pillars of our program, with dedicated support to the overarching design and implementation of STEAM, Literacy, and SEL and Wellness programming. These additional leaders on the educational team, who also have educational and professional backgrounds in their respective fields of expertise, also help teach classes and guide student success. With a student to faculty ratio of 8:1, our teachers are able to provide individualized support to meet student needs. A full team of nonprofit professionals guide the development and internal operations of the organization, ensuring that the educational team has the resources and support they need to carry out the school’s educational mission.

In the past year, GVP is proud to have received international and local recognition for our work educating refugee girls and young women. This past December, Global Village Project was selected alongside Clayton County Public Schools to receive the 2019 Partnership Award from Georgia State University’s College of Education and Human Development (CEHD). Each year, the award recognizes community organizations who have valuable partnerships with the college and are working to serve the public good by addressing educational and community challenges. Globally, we have continued to establish thought leadership in the field as we have been invited to present our work at conferences and have attracted partnerships and other engagements with organizations that are on the cutting edge of refugee education. But our biggest accomplishment of the past few years is seen in the successes and triumphs of our students, who continue to get caught up academically during their time at GVP, and go on to excel academically and professionally. Compared to the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) estimates that only about 1% of refugees globally have access to university education, we are proud of our work to remove barriers faced by refugee students and be a shaping force on their educational journeys.

Financials

Global Village Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Global Village Project

Board of directors
as of 1/5/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Ginger Schmeltzer

GDS Advisors, LLC

Term: 2015 - 2021

Steve Heckler

President, Accelebrate, Inc.

Connie Bryans

Philanthropist

Sally Dean

Retired Investment Banker

Linda Kay McGowan

Retired Vice President for Programs/Constituency Liaison, Centers for Disease Control

Bonnie O'Neill

Retired President, O'Neill & Associates & Founding Trustee, MedShare International

Han Pham

Attorney/Corporate Strategy and Social Enterprise, Hotshot Inc.

Sue Wooldridge

Management Consultant

Chowning Aguilera

Jackson Spalding

Gautam Huded

Brookfiled Properties

Derek Eiler

Fanatics

Sonya Ko

Retired Banking Executive

Susan Kupferberg

Clinical Psychologist

Alvin Townley

Author & Advocate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/05/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data